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The parks of Copenhagen

Image by Better Than Bacon

Wherever you are in Copenhagen, you will be no more than 15 minutes away from a park- this is part of what makes it a green city. These are just 5 of our favourite Copenhagen parks. 

  • Frederiksberg Have
  • Amaliehaven
  • Kongens Have
  • Botanical Garden
  • Bibliotekshaven

Frederiksberg Have

Nestled within Frederiksberg Have you can find a Chinese summer house, 7-meter waterfall, and, overlooking the grounds, the Frederiksberg Palace, where Frederik VI resided in the 1700s. Whilst living in the palace, Frederik VI would be rowed about on the canals that flow through the grounds. Today, you can take a guided tour of the very same canals, and observe the grand gardens from the water, before exploring them on foot. After exploring the gardens, sit on the luscious grass and enjoy a picnic in the sun.

Amaliehaven

Located between Amalienborg, the royal residence of Queen Margrethe II, and Copenhagens waterfront, Amaliehaven is a green oasis. The garden was designed by Belgian landscape architect Jean Delogne. His rectangular design of the green space contrasts perfectly with the natural curves of the flowering plants within the garden. The crowning glory of Amaliehaven is the large fountain in the center of the space, which provides the perfect location to sit and breathe away from the city. 

Kongens Have

Established in the early 17th century, Kongens Have is the oldest park in Copenhagen. Originally serving as the private gardens for King Christian IV’s Rosenborg Castle, the park is now visited by roughly 2.5 million people every year. Despite having been renovated several times, three of the original entrances to Kongens Have remain, as does the Hercules Pavillon, and statue of renowned author Hans Christian Andersen. During the summer months, the park becomes crowded with tourists and locals alike eager to catch some sun. 

Image by Kristoffer Trolle

Botanical Garden

Containing over 13,000 species of plants, the Botanical Garden can be found in the center of Copenhagen. Covering an area of 10 hectares, it is home to an array of Danish, perennial, and annual plants, as well as a rock garden housing plants found in mountainous areas in Central and Southern Europe. First established in 1600, the Botanical Garden was moved twice before given its permanent location in 1870. Amongst the array of astoundingly beautiful plants, there are 27 historical glasshouses. The most notable of these glasshouses is the Old Palm House, which was built in 1874. 

Bibliotekshaven

Bibliotekshaven is the garden of the Royal Danish Library. Originally, the land was used as a naval harbour which connected to the main harbour via a small canal. When the navy was moved to Holmens Kanal, the harbour was filled in. In honour of its maritime origins, there is a small pond in the middle of the garden, and an old mooring ring, not dissimilar to the ones used by ships in the 17th and 18th centuries, built into the masonry at the end of the garden. Visitors to the garden can observe the flowers changing with the seasons sitting comfortably on benches nestled across the grounds. 

Spend less time doing your laundry, and more time enjoying the parks around you, by letting Laundryheap sort your washing for you. To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Must-see Singapore sights

Photo by Kin Pastor from Pexels

Singapore is over-flowing with beautiful sights to see. These are just 10 of our favourites. 

  • Merlion Park
  • Gardens by the Bay
  • Botanic Gardens
  • Singapore Flyer
  • Chinatown
  • Sentosa Island 
  • Treetop walk at MacRitchie Reservoir
  • Lau Pa Sat market 
  • Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve
  • Pulau Ubin 

Merlion Park 

Merlion Park is one of Singapore’s most famous attractions. Located on the promenade overlooking Marina Bay, you will find the iconic 28-foot Merlion statue, shooting water into the bay. The half-lion half-fish statue is symbolic of Singapore’s beginnings as a fishing village, and a nod to ‘Singapura’, which translates to ‘Lion City’ in Malay. As one of Singapore’s most famous attractions for tourists, the area is always busy, so it may be best to view it later on in the day when there are fewer people, and both the Merlion and Marina Bay are lit up. 

Photo by Adhitya Andanu from Pexels

Gardens by the Bay 

Spread across 250 acres of land, Gardens by the Bay is a colourful and futuristic green space right in the middle of Marina Bay.  Undoubtedly, the stars of the Gardens by the Bay are their 18 Supertrees. 158,000 plants, of more than 700 species, cover the 18 Supertrees that tower over the park at 224 feet. Asides from the Supertrees, you will find the largest indoor waterfall, flowing at 114-feet, the Flower Dome hosting spectacular events, such as Tulipmania, and the Cloud Forest, which mimics the cool and moist ecology of the tropical highlands. The beautifully futuristic, and architecturally stunning, Gardens by the Bay is definitely worth a visit whilst you are in Singapore. 

Botanic Gardens 

Keeping with the greenery theme, Singapore’s Botanic Gardens make for a beautiful and peaceful visit. Singapore was awarded its first UNESCO World Heritage nomination for their Botanic Gardens, the first and only tropical botanic garden on the World Heritage list. The Gardens were designed with four cores- Tanglin, Central, Bukit Timah, and Tyersall Gallop. Within these 4 cores are an array of gardens with a multitude of different plants, including 48 species of Bonsai. It is the perfect place to stroll, relax, and admire the variety of plants that Singapore has to offer.

Image by Katie Hannan

Singapore Flyer

If you want to take in the whole of Singapore, it’s worth riding the Singapore Flyer- the world’s largest observation wheel. As you rise into the sky on a 30-minute journey, you can take in the sights of Singapore, whilst learning fun-facts about the country and its origins. If you want to ride in style, you can book Sky Dining, and enjoy a 4-course meal whilst taking in the beauty of Singapore. Alternatively, sip on a Singapore Sling or glass of Champagne whilst riding the wheel and appreciating the stunning views that Singapore has to offer. 

Photo by Ngrh Mei from Pexels

Chinatown 

Singapore’s Chinatown is a testament to the influence that China had on Singapore’s past. The streets are lined with red lanterns, and there is an abundance of restaurants selling authentic Chinese food. Nestled within Chinatown, you will find the Chinese Heritage Centre and beautiful temples. As you walk the streets, you will notice heritage markers that were installed to better explain the importance of the area. These markers have been translated into English, Japanese, and Chinese, and are worth reading to better understand both the area and the country. 

Image by Khalzuri Yazid

Sentosa Island

If you’re looking to relax on the beach, then head to Sentosa Island. Located 10-20 minutes away from Singapore’s city centre, Sentosa Island offers all the fun of a beach holiday, a stones-throw away from the city. Whether you are looking to relax on the beach, or try something a little bit more adventurous, there is something for everyone. On the Island, you will also find the Underwater World aquarium where you are given the opportunity to swim with dolphins. 

Image by Uwe Schwarzbach

Treetop Walk at MacRitchie Reservoir

There are several beautiful hiking routes in MacRitchie, and the Treetop Walk is the highlight of them all. The free-standing, 250m long, suspension bridge connects the two highest points in MacRitchie, Bukit Peirce and Bukit Kalang. As you hike across the bridge, you get a birds eye view of the vast array of plants and animals that inhabit the forest canopy. This 2 hour hike is the prime opportunity to observe the nature and beauty of Singapore whilst exploring the forest. 

Lau Pa Sat market 

Lau Pa Sat market is a Singapore landmark and national monument. Found in the heart of the financial district, the striking octagonal shape of the market is a spectacle in itself. It’s sweeping arches and columns are not dissimilar to it’s original structure of the 17th century. Nestled within the market is an array of culinary delights. The aroma of Singapore surrounds you as you pass from stall to stall and sample the local delicacies on offer. There is an old-world charm to Lau Pa Sat market that should not be missed. 

Image by William Cho

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve is Singapore’s ecological gem. Covering 87 hectares of land, the wetlands are a chance to see a multitude of animals in their natural habitat, including otters, kingfishers, crabs, and migrating birds. First discovered in 1986 by avid birdwatchers, the Singapore government designated the Wetland Reserve as a nature park in 1989 and has been welcoming eco-tourists since 1993. You can wander the Wetlands solo, or take a free guided tour. If you are a lover of nature, the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve should be at the top of your list. 

Image by cattan2011

Pulau Ubin 

Pulau Ubin offers a look into Singapore’s past. Located a short 15-minute boat ride away, it is an idyllic place to unwind away from Singapore City. Originally known as Pulau Batu Jubin, the island’s granite quarries provided the stone used to construct the Istana and the Singapore-Johore Causeway. Now, visitors can admire coconut rubber plantations, fish farms, and Singapore’s last remaining kampong (traditional village). As you trek the island, you will come across an array of different habitats, including seagrass lagoons and mangroves. With each new habitat, comes various different species of wildlife. If you are interested in exploring a new island, you can take a day trip to Pulau Ubin, or spend a little bit longer getting to know the island. 

Image by William Cho

Don’t let your laundry prevent you from fully exploring all of the wondrous sights that Singapore has to offer. Let Laundryheap sort out your laundry for you. You can book your service, and, whilst you are busy exploring, we will collect your laundry, launder it for you, and have it returned within 24 hours. 

To book your Laundryheap service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Manama travel guide

Manama is bursting with exquisite cuisine, nightlife, and culture, making it the perfect holiday destination. 

  • Temperature
  • Visa and passport requirements
  • How to get to Manama
  • Popular neighbourhoods
  • Currency
  • Must-see sights
  • Top delicacies
  • Shopping locations
  • Nightlife

Temperature

Manama has a desert climate, with the average yearly temperature reaching 26 degrees Celsius. The summer months are particularly brutal, as temperatures can reach as high as 50 degrees Celsius. In the winter, the temperature is considerably cooler, with temperatures ranging between 14 and 20 degrees. The spring and autumn months are more pleasant with temperatures averaging between 20 and 30 degrees Celsius. 

Image by Jacobs – Creative Bees

Visa and passport requirements 

If you are travelling to Manama as a United Arab Emirates national, you will not need a visa, but you will need to have your National ID Card. 

It’s best to check with your respective embassy whether you need a visa before visiting Manama.

Photo by Element5 Digital from Pexels

How to get to Manama 

To reach Manama, you can fly in to Bahrain International Airport. The airport is directly connected to major international destinations, such as New York, Mumbai, London, and Singapore

If you can’t fly into Bahrain International Airport, the King Fahd International Apirport is 53mks from Manama. 

Once you have landed, there are a number of taxi services available to take you into the city. Taxis can be expensive, so if you are looking for a cheaper option, the Saudi-Bharani Transport company run 8 buses daily into central Manama. Alternatively, if you have an international driving permit, you can hire a car and drive yourself into, and around, the city.

Photo by SevenStorm JUHASZIMRUS from Pexels

Popular neighbourhoods

Adliya is the central neighbourhood in Manama. It is where you will find the best restaurants and bars, so if you are looking for nightlife, it is the best place to start. 

Alternatively, Seef District, is located near the water front of Manama. There are an array of excelled restaurants to be found in the area, as well as Seef Mall and other shopping complexes. 

Amwaj Island sits in the Persian Gulf. It is a man-made island that comes complete with a water park and several shopping malls. It is the perfect neighbourhood for those on a family holiday. 

Currency

The local currency in Manama is Bahraini Dinars (BD). You can find BD in the form of 1,5,10, and 20 Dinar notes, or 5,10, 25, and 50 fils. 

Credit cards are widely used in Manama, however the local souq will only accept cash, so it is advised to buy Dinars beforehand. 

Must-see sights  

There are an abundance of incredible things to see and do in Manama, one of which is to visit the Manama Souk. It is a famous flea market, and the best place to buy gold, clothes, jewellery, and souvenirs. 

To get a better understanding of Bahrain and it’s culture, head to the heritage centre and explore its collection of traditional clothes and photographs. 

For the animal lovers, Bahrain’s Royal Camel Farm is a must-see. At the farm you will see, feed, and pet thousands of camels. 

If you are a thrill-seeker, visit Coral Bay. There, you can try a variety of water sports, from jet skiing to water skiing. Alternatively, you can take a relaxing boat trip across the Bay to soak in the sun and sea.

Top delicacies 

You can find a smorgasbord of delicacies in Manama, including kaboo, hot bread, and bharat, a mixture of local spices that is heavily used in many Manama dishes. The local fish include halibut, chimaera, mackerel, and bream. For those who are vegetarian, you can enjoy balls of falafel, hummus, and baba ghanoush. 

Photo by Polina Tankilevitch from Pexels

Shopping locations

The best place to shop in Manama is the Bab Al Bahrain souk district. You can find hundreds of stalls here, selling everything you would ever want. From flowers to spices, carpets to fruits, there is a vast array of souvenirs that can be found within the souk. 

If you are looking for gold, head to the Gold Souk. Here you will find jewellery, diamonds, watches, and, of course, gold. You can even trade in your old gold items for new ones. 

Moda Mall is where you will find all the best designer shops. Located on the ground floor of the World Trade Centre, you will find 160 international designer stores, including Armani, Versace, Louis Vuitton, and Christian Dior. Once you’ve finished shopping, you can relax and refuel at one of the many restaurants located within the mall. 

Nightlife 

Manama has a very vibrant nightlife. Whether you are looking to relax in a bar after a long day of sight-seeing, or are eager to party the night away at a club, you will find both within the city. 

There are several bars within Manama, the most popular of which offer outdoor seating. For the best bars, head to Block 338 in Adlliya. If you are looking for a quite drink, be warned that a lot of bars will turn up their music for more of a party vibe after 11pm. 

If a party vibe is what you are looking for, Manama has plenty of nightclubs to be enjoyed. Whether you want to listen to Western music, such as dance, pop, and hip hop, or Arabic music, there is something for all demographics. 

Photo by Mark Angelo from Pexels

Manama is a city that should be enjoyed to its fullest, which is why, whilst you are exploring, we will take care of your laundry. 

To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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How to get laundry done in a quarantine hotel

Photo by Tatiana from Pexels

You’ve arrived back in the UK, lugging your suitcase, and you’re immediately told that you must isolate for 10 days in a quarantine hotel. You will be provided with 3 meals a day, WIFI, and regular COVID tests. What won’t be provided, is a way for you to wash your clothes. How are you going to get your laundry done? 

  • In the sink 
  • Through the hotel 
  • Laundryheap

In the sink 

To wash your smaller items of clothing, such as t-shirts and underwear, you can use your quarantine hotel room bathroom sink. Before doing so, check with your hotel that you can have access to some form of laundry detergent. 

To hand-wash your clothes, fill your bathroom sink with warm water, and add the laundry detergent.

Place your items in the water, you may have to do this one item at a time depending on how big your sink is, and use a plunging motion to wash them. 

Once you are satisfied with the cleanliness of your items, rinse them with warm water. Make sure that you thoroughly rinse your clothing or you could be left with laundry detergent lingering in your garments. 

After rinsing your clothing, hang it over the shower and leave it to air dry. This could take some time depending on the warmth of your room and how many items you are trying to dry at once. 

Photo by ato de from Pexels

Through the hotel 

Some quarantine hotels may offer an in-house laundry service, at an additional cost. It is likely that a laundry service will only be available at certain times, so you will have to adjust your schedule accordingly. There is no guarantee that your quarantine hotel will offer a laundry service, so it is best to check before hand. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Laundryheap

Laundryheap is an on-demand laundry and dry-cleaning service. We will pick-up your laundry from your quarantine hotel, launder it, and have it re-delivered to you within 24 hours. We are fast, flexible, and efficient.

Our number one priority throughout the COVID 19 pandemic continues to be keeping our customers and partner drivers safe. That is why we offer a hot wash service, at no additional cost, and all of our deliveries are contactless. 

At Laundryheap, we understand that this is a scary time, and that having to quarantine in a hotel for 10 days is not easy. That is why we are here to help you get through it, with fresh clothes. 

Booking your Laundryheap order could not be simpler. You can head to our website, or download the free Laundryheap app from the App Store or Google Play Store. 


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Top places to visit in Boston

Boston is the capital city of Massachusetts. It is overflowing  with history and culture for you to explore at your leisure. 

  • Boston Common
  • Freedom Trail 
  • Faneuil Hall
  • Boston waterfront 
  • Boston Public Library 
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
  • Boston Museum of Fine Art 
  • Fenway Park 
  • The North End 
  • Museum of Science

Boston Common 

Boston Common can be found right in the heart of the city. It is America’s oldest park and is used by tourists and locals all year round. From November to mid-March you can rent skates and go ice skating on the Frog Pond. In the Spring months, you can watch blossoms bloom, and, in the summer, enjoy splashing around in the wading pool.

Adjoining the park, is the 24-acre Public Garden, America’s oldest botanical garden. It is here, that you can experience one of Boston’s most iconic experiences- sailing across the lake in Swan Boats, established in the 1870s. 

Freedom Trail 

Boston Common is also the beginning of the Freedom Trail- a three-mile trail that leads you to 16 of Boston’s historic monuments and sites. To follow the trail, simply keep to the red bricks on the sidewalk and footprints at the street crossings. 

You will begin your trail at Boston Common, where you can pick up brochures about each site you will be visiting at the Visitor Centre. From Boston Common, you can visit the State House, before moving on to the Old Granary Burying Ground, King’s Chapel Burying Ground, and the Old State House. 

The Boston Freedom Trail is the perfect way to learn a brief history of Boston, and America, in one day. 

Faneuil Hall

Faneuil Hall was built in 1740 as a market hall. It was presented to the city of Boston, under the condition that it would always be open to the public. On the ground floor, you can browse market stalls that spill over into the adjoining Faneuil Hall Marketplace, founded in the early 19th century. Here, you will find an abundance of shops, restaurants, and exhibitions. If the weather is nice, you may also find buskers and street performers in the square around the market. 

The second floor of Faneuil Hall is home to a council chamber where, in the 18th and 19th centuries, revolutionaries met. Above this chamber, you can explore the Ancient and Honourable Artillery Museum, which showcases an array of weaponry, uniforms, and paintings from significant battles.

Boston waterfront   

If you are looking for a spectacular view of the Boston city skyline, then head to the Boston waterfront. When you reach the waterfront, you can take a stroll along the harbour, currently 38 miles long, and take in the wonderful view of the city. The best way to experience the Boston waterfront, is by starting at the New England Aquarium and following the walk to the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse. Make sure you have your camera ready, because you won’t want to leave without a photo or two. 

Boston Public Library 

The Boston Public Library, founded in 1848, was the first publicly funded lending library in America. As you venture inside, you will find Renaissance Revival architecture and murals by John Singer Sargent and Edwin Abbey, granite medallions over the entrance arches, and three sets of bronze doors in the vestibule. It is one of the most beautiful buildings in Boston. 

Once you have admired inside the Boston Public Library, admire it on the outside by enjoying a picnic on the grassy lawn. You can relax amongst a strange mixture of old and new buildings, which tower over you in perfect harmony. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a must-visit for fans of modern and postmodern architecture. Spread across 150 acres, you can explore the works of noted architects, such as Alvar Aalto, Eduardo Catalano, I. M. Pei, Frank Gehry, and Eero Saarinen. Littered around the museum are sculptures and installations by artists such as Pablo Picasso and Henry Moore, all which can be viewed with the help of a self-guided walking tour map. There is plenty to see at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Boston Museum of Fine Art  

Nestled within the Boston Museum of Fine Art you will find impressionist paintings, Asian and Persian fine art, and ancient art from Greece and the Middle East. Recently, the museum has expanded to house an array of American art, laid out in chronological order. In this wing you will find American paintings, furniture, decorative arts, folk art, silver, glassware, and design dating from pre-Columbia. You don’t have to be a lover of fine art to find something of interest in this vast museum. 

Fenway Park 

Home to the Boston Red Sox, Fenway Park is known as America’s Most Loved Ballpark. First opened on the 20th of April 1912, not a lot has changed in the century it has been opened. As you tour the park, you can observe some of it’s classic features, such as the hand-operated scoreboard. Don’t forget to get a picture of the Green Monster, Fenway Park’s 37-foot green wall that you can find in left field. Even if you aren’t a sports fan, you will find a tour of the quirky Fenway Park interesting. 

The North End 

North End is one of Boston’s oldest neighbourhoods. It is where silversmith and activist leader Paul Revere lived during the American Revolution. The house that he lived in at the time, situated in North End, is open to tour, as is the Old North Church, where lanterns were lit  in April 1775 to alert Paul Revere that British troops were headed to Lexington to arrest the patriot leaders and confiscate the munitions supplies.

The North End is Boston’s Italian neighbourhood and, asides from the historical importance of the site, is the best spot to find Italian restaurants, cafes, and bakeries. 

Museum of Science

You will find 700 permanent -hands-on exhibits at the Museum of Science. From physics and biology, to zoology and astronomy, no matter what your science interest is, you will find it at the museum. Just some of the highlights include a 65-million-year-old fossil, butterfly garden, and the planetarium which has daily laser and star shows. This museum is the perfect opportunity to explore science in the most interactive and engaging way possible.

Whilst you’re busy exploring the many sites of Boston, let us take care of your laundry. Book your Laundryheap service and we will pick-up, dry clean, and re-deliver your laundry to you within 24 hours. Simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the Laundryheap app, to book your service. 


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Things to do in The Hague

The Hague is the third-largest city in the Netherlands, just behind Amsterdam and Rotterdam. There is no shortage of things to do in The Hague, but we have narrowed it down to the top 10.  

  • Escher in Het Paleis
  • Madurodam
  • Mauritshuis Museum 
  • Drievliet
  • Peace Palace
  • The Hague Tower
  • Landgoed Clingendael Park
  • Explore the canals 
  • Scheveningen
  • Haagse Markt 

Escher in Het Paleis 

If you are a fan of art and maths, then the Escher in Het Paleis is the perfect place for you. During the 20th century, Dutch artist M.C. Escher would apply mathematics and geometry to his graphic art, creating masterpieces with beautiful symmetry. What was once a royal palace, is now a museum dedicated to his work, showcasing over 150 of his most famous pieces. In addition to exploring Escher’s wonderful artwork, the second floor of the museum has been converted into an interactive, optical illusion experience, which allows visitors to see through Escher’s eyes. Escher in Het Paleis is opened 11 am-5 pm Tuesday-Sunday. 

Madurodam 

Madurodam is a miniature park that offers a unique way to explore the history of Holland. The park is divided into 3 sections- City Centre, Water World, and Innovation Island. In the City Centre, you can begin by exploring how Holland developed into the country we see today. Water World, showcases the port of Rotterdam and explains how the famous watermills of Holland work. Finally, Innovation Island showcases modern-day Holland, and all it has to offer. Once you have explored the past and present of Holland, there are an array of play parks and gardens to enjoy.

Mauritshuis Museum 

The Mauritshuis Museum is a cultural must when visiting The Hague. It is home to the most extraordinary collection of Dutch Golden Age paintings, including ‘The Girl With The Pearl Earring’ by Johannes Vermeer. You can wander the museum at your own leisure, or take part in the array of activities that are on offer. On Monday’s, a short talk is given by a member of staff discussing a particular painting, artist, or subject. In addition, there are monthly art lectures and various learning opportunities for children to explore the world of art. 

Drievliet

Whether you are exploring the park with family, or looking for a thrilling adventure, you will find plenty of rides to satisfy your needs at Drievliet. Included in the park are 20 rides that all the family can enjoy, and 5 deluxe rollercoasters, guaranteed to set your hair on edge. Once you are satisfied with your thrill-seeking experience, you can enjoy one of the family-friendly entertainment shows that are put on at Drievliet. 

Peace Palace 

The Peace Palace is why The Hague is known as the City of Peace and Justice. It was built at the end of the 19th century and established as the home for the Permanent Court of Arbitration, where alternative solutions to war between countries could be discussed. Now, you can visit the Peace Palace and join a 90-minute tour of the premises. As you are on your tour, take note of the various pieces of artwork that decorate the hallways. Each piece was gifted by various city governments. 

The Hague Tower 

Standing 132m tall, The Hague Tower is the third tallest building in The Hague. The majority of the building is made up of offices, however, further up the tower is a nightclub, restaurant, and viewing platform. From the viewing platform you can enjoy panoramic views of The Hague. You can even see boats come in from the North sea at the Hook of Holland. This is the perfect opportunity to see the whole of The Hague at one time.

Landgoed Clingendael Park

The Clingendael is a 17th century manor house which is surrounded by exquisite gardens. One of the stand-out features is it’s Japanese garden, although it is only open for a short period of the year due to it’s fragility. The Japanese garden was created at the beginning of the 20th century by the former owner of the manor house, Marguerite M. Baroness van Brienen. She had sailed to Japan on multiple occasions, and bought back lanterns, a water cask, sculptures, and several plants. It is the only Japanese garden in The Netherlands. 

Other than the Japanese garden, The Clingendael has an abundance of green space to enjoy picnics and relaxing days in the sun. There is even a large playground for the little ones. 

Explore the canals 

The Hague is home to 10 canals which were dug in the 14th century for transportation and defence purposes. In the 20th century, these canals were filled to improve sanitation. It wasn’t until 2004 that part of The Hague’s canal system was uncovered for people to sail or walk along. Sailing down the canals of The Hague requires payment, however, walking across them is completely free. 

Scheveningen

The beaches of The Hague is what sets it apart from other Dutch cities. You can spend your morning strolling across the canals, and be at the beach by the afternoon. The largest beach in The Hague is Scheveningen. Scheveningen is best known for its pier, which opened in 1959, but was sadly destroyed during World War 2. It was later renovated in 2015, and now includes a shopping centre. At the end of the pier is a 50 meter high Ferris Wheel from which you can enjoy panoramic views of the sea, and the skyline of The Hague. 

Haagse Markt 

Haagse Markt is the largest outdoor market in Europe, and the place to enjoy the multicultural side of The Hague. Although this market does sell goods, such as flowers, clothes, and household goods, it is best known for its array of food. As you walk from market stall to market stall you can sample the cuisine of the Dutch, Germans, Turkish, and Caribbean, all in one place.

Whilst you are exploring all that The Hague has to offer, we will take care of your laundry. Simply book your Laundryheap service, and we will do the rest.

To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website, or, download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Top days out in Birmingham

As the second biggest city in the UK, there is an abundance of incredible days out to experience in Birmingham. These are our top 10.

  • Thinktank, Birmingham science museum 
  • Barber Institute of Fine Arts
  • Cadbury World 
  • Black Country Living museum 
  • Botanical gardens 
  • Peaky Blinders tour
  • The Birmingham Bullring 
  • Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park
  • Sea Life Centre
  • Cannon Hill Park

Thinktank, Birmingham science museum

Whether you enter the Thinktank science museum with an interest in science or not, you will certainly leave it astounded by what you’ve seen. Thinktank is an award-winning museum that is home to an eclectic collection of science-related exhibits.

For centuries, Birmingham has been an important industrial centre, and Thinktank showcases many of the machines that helped Birmingham’s industrial growth. Some of the key exhibits include the Spitfire Gallery, the Science Garden, and the Thinktank Planetarium. 

Barber Institute of Fine Arts

The Barber Institute of Fine Arts is home to an exciting collection of Renaissance and 20th-century art. It is located a stone’s throw away from Birmingham University, and includes art from the likes of Botticelli, Bellini, and Monet. You can explore the wonderful collection of artwork at your own pace, or book a guided tour. If you have time, make sure to visit the café and gift shop. 

Cadbury World 

Who wouldn’t want to visit a chocolate factory? Bournville, a short drive from Birmingham, is home to the original Cadbury’s chocolate factory, where the Dairy Milk was formed.

Begin by taking a tour of the factory and learning about the history behind Cadbury’s chocolate. Then, explore Bull Street, a replica street that is reminiscent of the 1820s. Finally, let your inner child come out and enjoy the theme-park-like attractions the park has to offer. 

After fully touring the factory and its grounds, spend some time exploring the picture-perfect village of Bourneville, which was built by the Cadbury family in 1860.

Black Country Living Museum 

As mentioned, Birmingham is an industrial city. Nine-miles west, in the town of Dudley, is the Back Country Living Museum. Set across a 26-acre site, visitors can delve into the history of mining through an old mine shaft and reconstructed, turn-of-the-century, industrial community, consisting of 50 authentic buildings. You can completely immerse yourself in this experience as you take costumed guided tours, travel on a vintage tram, and even enjoy a 19th-century fun fair

Botanical gardens 

You will find Birmingham’s Botanical gardens in the suburb of Edgbaston. Founded in 1829, the Botanical gardens were used to showcase new and exotic plants that had been found around the world. Apart from the greenhouses, which house a number of exotic flora, the layout of Birmingham’s Botanical gardens remains largely the same. The Botanical gardens are beautiful during all seasons, although specifically in the spring/summer months, and are a fantastic way to see an array of exotic flora. 

Peaky Blinders tour 

If you are a fan of the hit BBC drama Peaky Blinders, why not discover the true story of the gang?

You will begin your tour at The Old Crown on Deritend High Street, where you will be met with a welcome drink. There, you will also meet your tour guide, Professor Carl Chinn MBE. Next, you will be taken through the streets of Birmingham, and told the gruesome truth behind Birmingham’s most notorious gang. After your tour, you will feast on a traditional Victorian dinner, which will end with the telling of the Peaky Blinders ultimate demise.

The Birmingham Bullring  

The Birmingham Bullring is the go-to location for all your shopping needs. Connected via a link bridge to Birmingham Grand Central train station, the Bullring is the largest city centre shopping centre in the UK. Established in 1154, the Bullring has historically been the go-to place to shop. What was once a series of market stalls, is now an indoor shopping centre, home to a multitude of shops and restaurants, including one of only four Selfridge’s department stores in the UK. 

Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park 

Birmingham’s Wildlife Conservation Park is home to a unique collection of animals from across the world. Just some of the wildlife you can see include red pandas, lemurs, meerkats, otters, and wallabies. Some of the animals homed at Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park are endangered in the wild, so the park work to breed those animals in an attempt to conserve the species. If you are an avid zoologist or just love animals, Birmingham Wildlife Conservation Park is a must-visit. 

Sea Life Centre 

Keeping with the animal theme, if you are a fan of aquatic animals then the Sea Life Centre is the perfect day out. Home to over 60 marine exhibits,  a million-litre ocean tank, and an underwater tunnel, the Sea Life Centre is guaranteed fun for all ages. There are over 2,000 sea creatures that call the centre home, including sea horses, reef sharks, giant turtles, and giant octopi. Birmingham’s Sea Life Centre is a fun, and educational, day out. 

Cannon Hill Park  

If you have visited Birmingham’s Wildlife Conservation Park, you can spend the rest of your day exploring Cannon Hill Park. From fun parks to the land train, Cannon Hill Park is packed with fun family activities. Included in the park are mini-golf, swan boats, the garden tea room, and tennis courts. Whether you’re sporty, competitive, or just want to admire the greenery, Cannon Hill Park has something for everyone to enjoy. 

Whilst you’re enjoying a day-out in Birmingham, let us take care of your laundry. Head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to book your laundry and dry cleaning service.


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Top tips for doing laundry while in Southeast Asia

If you are travelling around Southeast Asia for an extended period of time, you will need to do laundry. Here are some top tips on how to do so.

  • Pack smartly
  • Travel with mini laundry detergents
  • Don’t forget a laundry bag 
  • Never use hotels
  • Bring a makeshift clothesline 
  • Dry your clothes inside
  • Carry plenty of coins 
  • Plan your laundry time
  • The bag method 
  • Laundryheap

Pack smartly

The most important thing to remember is to pack light and pack materials that are easy to wash. There are several ways to do laundry in Southeast Asia, from using a launderettes to washing your clothes in the sink, regardless of the method you decide to use you don’t want to spend an extended period of time, or money, doing it. In addition, it’s best to pack clothes that are durable and easy to wash, such as cotton

Image by Stefan Coders from Pixabay

Travel with mini laundry detergents 

There are several launderettes across Southeast Asia that you can use. To make your laundry experience quick and easy, travel with mini laundry detergents. They are pre-measured for one or two washes, and will prevent you from having to carry, or buy, a full-sized detergent that you will not use. 

Don’t forget a laundry bag

Laundry bags are handy to take wherever you travel to. As soon as an item of your clothing is dirty, simply put it in your laundry bag so that you can differentiate between your clean and dirty clothes. As soon as your laundry bag is full, or you are running low on clean clothes, you can decide how best to clean them. In addition, if your clothing is still wet or damp, but you need to pack them away, putting your clothes in your laundry bag will prevent the smell of damp clothing spreading to your other packed belongings. 

Never use hotels 

If you are staying in a hotel whilst travelling around Southeast Asia there will more than likely be a laundry service provided. Do not use it. Hotel laundry services will usually charge per item of clothing that needs to be laundered rather than by weight. This can result in an extortionate laundry bill by the time you have washed all of your clothes. It may be convenient to use the hotels services, but, if you are looking to save some money, its best to look around for local launderettes or alternative ways to wash your clothes. 

Image by John

Bring a makeshift clothes line 

Unless you know that there are tumble dryers available where you are planning to wash your clothes, it’s always best to pack a makeshift clothes line. Your clothesline can be something as simple as some strong rope, as long as you have something that you can hang your clothes on to dry. Some laundrettes will have clothes lines available for you to use, however, this is not a guarantee so it’s always better to bring your own.

Dry your clothes inside 

Southeast Asia is known for its warm and sunny climate, however, it is also extremely humid. If you are planning on hanging your clothes out to dry, it’s best to do so indoors rather than outside. The humidity from the air will slow down the drying process, making it more time efficient to simply hang your clothing in your hostel/hotel room. 

Carry plenty of coins 

There is no shortage of coin-operated laundrettes in Southeast Asia, but you have to make sure that you have the coins to use them. There is nothing worse than turning up to a laundrettes, filling a machine with your washing, only to find out that you don’t have enough coins to operate the machine. To save yourself the hassle, make sure that you have plenty of coins with you to get your washing done. 

Plan your laundry time 

If you are going to do laundry whilst in Southeast Asia it’s best to plan your time effectively. There are a lot of things you need to consider, such as drying times, pick-up times, and when laundrettes are opened. Plan your method of laundry prior to going on your travels and it will help you manage your laundry time much more efficiently.

The bag method 

This is a slightly unusual method for doing laundry, but is a handy alternative if you do not have access to a laundrette. 

For the bag method you will need a vinyl bag, water, and laundry detergent. 

Begin by filling your vinyl bag until it is half filled and put your clothes in it. Next, add in your detergent and let your clothes soak for a few minutes. After a few minute, use a plunging motion to rotate your clothing. Once you are satisfied with the cleanliness of your clothing, take each item out and rinse off the detergent with water. 

Laundryheap 

If you don’t want to take care of your clothing yourself whilst travelling in Southeast Asia, use Laundryheap. We will pick up, dry clean, and re-deliver your laundry to you, completely contactless, and on you schedule. 

To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Top places to eat in Singapore

Image by Eric Lee from Pixabay

Singapore is home to some of the best cuisine in the world. Here are just ten of the top restaurants we would recommend trying whilst in Singapore. 

  • Candlenut
  • 328 Katong Laska 
  • Sushi Kimura 
  • Burnt Ends 
  • Keng Eng Kee Seafood
  • Warong Nasi Pariaman 
  • Corner House
  • Samy’s Curry
  • J.B Ah Meng 
  • Spring Court

Candlenut

Candlenut was the first Peranakan restaurant to earn a Michelin star. At Candlenut, Singaporean chef Malcolm Lee taps into his heritage to deliver his modern interpretation of traditional Chinese cuisine. Many of the recipes you can sample have been passed down through generations and you can taste the heritage of each dish in every bite. Make sure to try the bakwan kepiting. 

Image by benhosg_old

328 Katong Laksa

Laksa is a popular spicy noodle soup, and there is nowhere better to get it than at Katong Laksa. If you are looking for a fancy dining experience you won’t find it here, but if you are looking for delicious, authentic, Singaporean food, you have come to the right place. The menu at 328 Katong Laksa is limited, so making your choice is fast and easy- perfect for enjoying your noodles as quickly as possible. 

Sushi Kimura 

Chef and owner of Sushi Kimura, Tomoo Kimura, has over 20 years of sushi-crafting experience. He offers an incredible Japanese sushi experience, that includes artisan ingredients that change with the seasons. Since Sushi Kimura gained its Michelin star it has become increasingly popular, so it’s best to book a table in advance.

Image by Ella Olsson

Burnt Ends

If you are a fan of BBQ then you have to try Burnt Ends, Singapore’s best BBQ joint. Surrounded by a burnt wood and iron exterior, you immediately become immersed in the BBQ experience as you sit facing a line of chefs intensely BBQing chunks of meat. Everyday the menu changes, with only a few staple dishes remaining all season, such as the pulled-pork Sanger.

Keng Eng Kee Seafood

Keng Eng Kee Seafood offers cooked-to-order wok-fried dishes. You will find everything here, from moonlight hor fun to Singapore’s best claypot pork liver.  Located on Bukit Merah Lane, it is constantly buzzing with people trying to secure a seat so make sure that you book well in advance. 

Image by Choo Yut Shing

Warong Nasi Pariaman 

Having served nasi padang since 1948, Warong Nasi Pariaman is the longest-running nasi padang joint in Singapore. At this Halal-certified restaurant, you can find traditional dishes such as ayam bakar, barbecued chicken served in thick coconut gravy, and sambal goreng, a type of spicy stir fry. It is important to note that because this restaurant is Halal there is no alcohol served on the premises.

Image by Shi Lin Tan from Pixabay

 Corner House 

Corner House resides in the historic home of a 20th century British Botanist, which is very fitting with the botanical theme of the restaurant. Singaporean chef, Jason Tan, showcases his gastro-botanical menu in his residence, which is built from the finest ingredients from across the world. The highlight of his eclectic menu is the Cevennes Onion, which is built using several different methods of cooking onions. 

Image by Jack at Wikipedia

Samy’s Curry 

Samy’s Curry was opened in the 1950’s, and continues to be run by the same family today. At Samy’s Curry, you will find an array of classic, home-style, curry’s, including chicken masala and fish cutlets. This is far from a fine-dining experience as servers ladle curry and rice onto sheets of banana leaves. It is recommended that you enjoy your curry with your hands. Sinks are provided at the back of the restaurant so that you can adequately clean yourself up at the end. 

Image by su-lin

J.B. Ah Meng

If you want a true taste of Singapore, head to J.B. Ah Meng. There is nothing fancy about this restaurant, however, it is where Singapore chefs come for their post-work meal, so you know it’s good. You will find J.B. Ah Meng in the heart of Singapore’s red-light district, in a simply furnished, two-story building. For the best tze char in Singapore, head to J.B. Ah Meng and enjoy the relaxing setting. 

Image by City Foodsters

Spring Court 

Spring Court is Singapore’s oldest family-owned restaurants. It sells traditional dishes that have been served for generations, including deep-fried boneless chicken and prawn paste, and crab meat rolls stuffed with chicken liver and salted egg. Originally, Spring Court was a purely Cantonese restaurant, but, as Singapore began to diversify, so did Spring Court. This restaurant offers a wonderful reflection on Singaporean food and how it has developed over the years, whilst holding onto its traditional roots.

Image by Choo Yut Shing

Whilst you enjoy the amazing foods of Singapore, we will take care of your laundry. Book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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Tourists tips when visiting Singapore

Image by Jason Goh from Pixabay

If you have booked yourself a trip to Singapore these tourist tips will help you make the most of your holiday. 

  • Pack smart
  • Hostels and hotels
  • Know the law
  • Use public transportation
  • Carry cash
  • Eat like a local
  • Stick to happy hour
  • Be smart with tipping
  • Head to the free attractions
  • Ride the Singapore Flyer

Pack smart 

Singapore is not only hot but also incredibly humid all year round. You need to pack lightweight clothing, such as cotton and linen, that will be comfortable and won’t stick to your skin. Asides from comfortable, lightweight clothing, make sure that you also pack some waterproofs. Rain is a common occurrence in Singapore, and when it rains it comes down hard.

Hostels and hotels  

Singapore is much more expensive than many other Asian cities, which means their hotels are also incredibly expensive. If money is no object on your Singapore holiday, there is an array of luxury hotels that offer 5-star rooms, complete with breathtaking views. If you are looking for cheaper accommodation for your stay, there are plenty of hostels scattered throughout the city. 

Top tourist tip: If you are travelling to Singapore during the peak holiday season make sure that you book your accommodation in advance. 

Know the law 

Singapore is rated as one of the safest cities in the world. This status has only been achieved due to its many laws and regulations, some of which are harsher than others. Before travelling to Singapore, make sure that you have a base knowledge of the rules and regulations that you must abide by or you may find yourself with a $500 fine for eating on the MRT (Singapore’s subway system).

Use public transportation  

The easiest, and cheapest, way to explore Singapore is by using public transport. Singapore MRT (Mass Rapid Transit) is the equivalent to a tube or subway- it can get you pretty much wherever you want to go. If you aren’t a fan of underground transportation, Singapore has a collection of buses that you can hop on and off at leisure. To make your journeys around Singapore easier, buy a Tourist Pass. You can choose either a 1,2 or 3-day pass, and once bought you can use the pass to get on all of Singapore’s public transport. Simply tap your pass, and away you go. 

Carry cash 

Like many countries, Singapore is making the move to becoming cashless. This being said, there are still areas where only cash is accepted. In places such as residential shops and kopi-tiams eateries (coffee shops), there are no card machines for card and contactless payments. It’s always best to carry between $50 and $100 with you just in case. 

Eat like a local 

Singapore is home to some of the best food in the world, and the place to find that food is the food centres and hawker stalls around China Town and Marina Bay. Here you will find local delicacies, such as chili crab and laksa, at affordable prices. These informal eateries will provide you will a high-quality meal without having to spend a fortune. Even if money is not an object on your holiday, make sure to have at least one local meal. 

Stick to happy hour  

Alcohol is incredibly expensive in Singapore. On average, a cocktail will set you back $20, whilst a beer can cost upwards of $10. That being said, from 5 pm to 9 pm, in bars across the city happy hour drastically reduces the price of these alcoholic drinks. If you are looking for an evening tipple, but don’t want to spend a fortune, make sure to check out the happy hour deals that are on offer. 

Be smart with tipping 

Unlike countries such as America, in Singapore, it is not mandatory to tip. This means that you do not have to add service charge on top of your meal. That being said, if you do think that the service was particularly good, it is always appreciated when a tip is given. 

Head to the free attractions 

As already established, Singapore is an expensive city for a holiday. That being said, there are plenty of free activities and attractions that will save you some money. Some of the free attractions to visit include the multitude of parks throughout the city, Chinese and Indian temples, the Singapore Botanical Gardens, and the Festive Light-up’s. 

Ride The Singapore Flyer

The Singapore Flyer is an amazing way to get panoramic views of the city. At 165 meters tall, it is one of the highest Ferris wheels in the world. One full rotation will take 30 minutes to complete, in which time you can view the whole city. An adult ticket is $33, and tickets can be bought on the day, however, there are online discounts available. Just be sure that you aren’t afraid of heights before taking on the wheel. 

Whilst holidaying in Singapore, let us take care of your laundry. We can pick up your laundry from your accommodation and, whilst you enjoy the city, we can have your clothes dry cleaned and re-delivered to you. To book your service simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.