Laundryheap Blog – Laundry & Dry Cleaning

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Pre-treatment alternatives

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

The best way to remove stains is to pre-treat them. If you don’t have any pre-treatment products, pre-treat your stains with these alternatives. 

  • Baking soda
  • Lemon/lime
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Corn starch 
  • Salt
  • Dish soap
  • Laundry detergent 

Baking soda

Baking soda is particularly useful at pre-treating odorous wet stains, such as coffee. The powdery consistency sucks up the wetness of the stain, whilst absorbing the odour, leaving your clothing with an odourless and smaller stain. Make sure to always brush off the baking soda before washing your garment. Alternatively, you can make a baking soda paste by mixing two parts baking soda with one part water. Spreading the paste over your stain will help to loosen it from the fibres of your clothing

Photo by Kaboompics .com from Pexels

Lemon/lime

The natural acidity in lemon and lime acts as a natural bleaching agent. Squeezing lemon or lime juice directly over the stain will begin bleaching it, making the stain lighter and easier to remove in the wash. Be warned that using lemon or lime juice on coloured clothing may cause discolouration, so use with caution or only on white clothing. It is particularly effective on yellow underarm and rust stains

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Hydrogen peroxide

Similarly to lemon and lime, hydrogen peroxide is a natural bleaching agent. Simply pour or spray a small amount of the solution on to your stain, and allow it to sit for 10 minutes. The hydrogen peroxide will begin to break down and lift your stain, making it easier for it to be completely lifted in the wash. After 10 minutes, wash your garment as you usually would, and observe as your clothing becomes completely stain-free. 

Image by Duncan Creamer

Corn starch

If you have an oily or greasy stain, immediately sprinkle corn starch over it. Make sure that your stain is completely covered by the corn starch, and leave it to sit for at least 10 minutes. The small particles that make up the corn starch will begin absorbing the stain, lifting it from your garment. If you catch your stain quick enough, the corn starch alone may be enough to lift your stain completely. If not, wash your item as you usually would. 

Image by JaBB

Salt 

Salt works in a similar way to corn starch, particularly on red wine stains. The particles that make up the salt absorb the stain, leaving a smaller and more manageable stain behind. Sprinkle your red wine stain with a liberal amount of salt, the cheaper the better, and leave it to sit for at least 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, brush the salt from your garment and observe whether your stain has reduced in size and become lighter. If not, you may want to apply more salt and leave it for longer. 

Photo by Castorly Stock from Pexels

Dish soap 

Dish soap is manufactured to tackle greasy and oily substances. To remove stains using dish soap, squirt a small amount directly onto the stain, and use your fingers, or a soft-bristled brush, to rub it in. Leave it to sit for 10 minutes, before rinsing it from your stain, and washing as you usually would. 

Photo by Vivaan Rupani from Pexels

Laundry detergent 

Laundry detergent is specially formulated to lift dirt from clothing, which makes it a great pre-treatment. You can use laundry detergent in the same way as you would use dish soap. Rub a small amount directly onto your stain, leave it to sit for 10 minutes, and then rinse it from your garment. It’s best, and easiest, to use liquid laundry detergent. Alternatively, you can make a paste from powdered laundry detergent and water which you can spread directly onto your stain. 

Image by ajay_suresh

The best way to treat any stain is to let us do it for you. Book your Laundryheap order by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to remove beetroot stains

Image by Nick Collins from Pixabay

Beetroot is both delicious and it’s vibrant purple colour brightens up any dish. That being said, it is a natural, and permanent, dye, which makes beetroot stains on clothing lethal. Catch your stain early, and follow these steps, to ensure that your stain is lifted and your clothing isn’t dyed forever. 

  • Machine washable clothing 
  • Dry clean only clothing
  • Laundryheap

Machine washable clothing 

To remove beetroot stains from machine washable clothing you will need…
  • Kitchen towel
  • Cold water
  • Laundry detergent 
  • Washing machine 
  • Chlorine bleach or colour-safe bleach (optional)

To begin removing your beetroot stain, soak a kitchen towel in cold water and gently blot at the stain. Make sure that you are blotting and not rubbing the stain as rubbing will only set the beetroot further into your garment. As you blot, you should notice the stain transferring to your kitchen cloth. Continue blotting until you are satisfied that no more of the stain will be lifted. 

Once you are finished blotting, place your stain under a cold running tap. The water should turn a light purple colour as a result of it pushing more of the beetroot from your clothing. Continue holding your garment under the water until it runs clear. 

After dabbing and holding it under cold water your stain may be lifted. If it has not, gently work a small amount of laundry detergent into the area, and leave it to sit for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, rinse the laundry detergent from your garment, gently rubbing your stain with your fingers to encourage it to lift with the detergent. Continue rinsing until all of the detergent has been removed. 

Once you have removed the detergent from your garment, check to see if your stain has lightened in colour or been lifted. If it has, wash your garment in your washing machine as you usually would. If your stain is still vibrant and visible, repeat the previous steps. 

An alternative solution to lift your stain is to soak your item in chlorine or a colour safe bleach. Submerge your garment in a mixture of bleach and cold water for a minimum of 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, remove your item from the bleach solution and wash as you usually would.

Photo by Eva Elijas from Pexels

Dry clean only clothing 

To remove beetroot stains from dry clean only clothing you will need…
  • Dry cloth 
  • Damp sponge 
  • Bread (optional)

Begin lifting your beetroot stain by blotting it with a clean dry cloth. Similarly to with machine washable clothing, you must make sure that you are blotting not rubbing the stain. This will help to soak up any excess beetroot liquid and begin lifting the stain. Continue to dab until no more colour is transferred to the cloth. 

Next, dampen a clean sponge with cold water, and place it directly over the stain, making sure that it covers the full area. Do not rub or move the sponge as this can cause the beetroot to set further into the fibres of your garment. The sponge will begin absorbing the beetroot from your clothing, lifting it from your item and on to the sponge. After 5 minutes, check how much of your stain has been absorbed, and, if necessary, re-dampen the sponge and place it back on your stain for a further 5 minutes. Repeat this process until your stain has been lifted. 

If you do not have a clean sponge on hand, an alternative option is to use bread. In the same way as you would use the sponge, dampen the bread using cold water and place it over the stain. The bread will absorb the beetroot from your garment, lifting the stain. 

Once you have used either a sponge or bread to lift your beetroot stain, take a clean, dry, cloth and dab at any remnants of the stain. This should leave you with stain-free clothing

Image by Marco Verch Professional P

Laundryheap 

If you are struggling to lift your beetroot stain, or any other stain for that matter, let us take care of it for you. All you have to do is left us know what the stain is and where it is located, and we will do the rest. To book your Laundryheap order head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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The 5 stains of Easter

Photo by Helena Lopes from Pexels

Easter is a time for celebration, spending time with family, and eating lots of chocolate. Don’t let stains get in the way of your Easter fun, use these tips for removing stains from clothing and continue having a great weekend. 

  • Chocolate 
  • Butter
  • Acrylic paint
  • Glue
  • Grass

Chocolate 

The sugar high that comes with eating copious amounts of chocolate, can easily lead to melted chocolate stained clothing. 

To remove a chocolate stain you will need…

To begin removing your stain, use a butter knife or spoon to gently scrape as much of your chocolate off of your clothing as possible. Be careful to not push too hard when doing this as you don’t want to cause rips, or spread the chocolate stain further.

After you have removed as much chocolate as possible, flush your stain with cold water. Make sure that you are using cold and not hot water because hot water will only set your chocolate stain further into your clothing. 

Once you have flushed out the stain, gently rub heavy-duty laundry detergent over the top of it. Leave your garment for 5 minutes to allow the laundry detergent to soak into the stain. After 5 minutes, soak your item in cold water for 15 minutes, gently rubbing over your stain every 3-5 minutes to loosen it. 

Finally, remove your garment from the cold water and flush your stain once more with cold water. You should notice your stain has either disappeared or is lighter in colour. If either of these options is the case, wash your item as you usually would. The wash should remove any remnants of the stain. If, after you have washed your garment your stain remains, repeat the process. 

Photo by Giftpundits.com from Pexels

Butter 

Hot cross buns are complimented perfectly when topped with a generous amount of butter. If you accidentally drop some butter on your clothing, don’t panic, simply follow these instructions. 

To remove a butter stain you will need…

  • A clean white cloth or paper towel
  • A butter knife or spoon
  • Cornstarch, baking soda, or talcum powder
  • Heavy duty liquid detergent 

If your butter stain has been caused by a blob of butter, begin the removal process by using a butter knife or spoon to gently lift as much solid butter from your clothing as possible. Be careful not to press too hard on your fabric as this can cause rips, and possibly spread the stain. 

After you have removed any solid bits of butter, use a clean white cloth, or paper towel, to gently dab the stain. Make sure that you are dabbing and not rubbing, as rubbing will cause your stain to set further into your clothing

Once you have removed as much excess oil from the stain as possible, sprinkle a generous amount of cornstarch, baking soda, or talcum powder over your stain. Allow your powder to sit on your stain for at least 15 minutes to give it an ample amount of time to absorb as much oil as possible. After 15 minutes, gently brush the powder off of your item. 

Next, add a generous helping of liquid laundry detergent to your stain, and use your fingers to gently rub it in. Leave your detergent for at least 15 minutes. 

Finally, wash your item as you usually would. If your stain has not been removed, repeat the process. 

Image by tico_24

Acrylic paint 

A fun Easter activity is painting eggs bright colours using acrylic paint. Unfortunately, acrylic paint is incredibly easy to drip on yourself. 

To remove wet acrylic paint you will need…

  • Cold water
  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent 

Wet acrylic paint acts very similarly to water-based paint, which makes it easier to remove. To begin removing your stain, place it under cold running water. The water will flush-out the acrylic paint, so leave your garment under the running water until it begins to run clear. 

Once you are satisfied that your stain has been sufficiently flushed-out, place an ample amount of heavy-duty laundry detergent over your stain and leave it for 15 minutes. Your laundry detergent will lift any remaining acrylic paint. 

Finally, wash your item as you usually would. When taking your stained garment out of the washing machine, make sure to check that the stain has been completely removed before drying. If your stain hasn’t been completely removed, repeat the process. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

To remove dried acrylic paint you will need… 

  • Rubbing alcohol, nail varnish remover, or alcohol-based hairspray
  • A dry, clean, white cloth or paper towel

If you leave your acrylic paint stain to dry, the paint is slightly harder to remove, but not impossible. The paint forms a plastic layer that acts similarly to an oil-based stain, meaning that flushing it out won’t be effective. 

To begin removing dried acrylic paint, apply an ample amount of rubbing alcohol, nail varnish remover, or alcohol-based hairspray to a clean white cloth and rub your stain. Before rubbing your stain, you may want to check the liquid you’re using won’t further stain your item by rubbing a small amount on an inconspicuous area. Continuously rub at your stain until you visibly begin to see it lighten in colour. 

Once you are satisfied with the lightened colour of your stain, you can proceed with the same method as removing wet acrylic paint. 

Photo by Chavdar Lungov from Pexels

Glue

Easter is a great time to get crafty. Not only can you decorate eggs, but you can make Easter baskets, Easter masks, and even an Easter pinata. Crafting is a great way to keep occupied over the Easter period but also means there is an increased risk of glue being spilled on clothes. 

To remove water-based glue you will need…

  • A butter knife or spoon
  • Cold water
  • Liquid laundry detergent 

Before you begin removing your glue stain, you need to wait for it to completely dry. You will know that it has dried when it goes clear. 

Once dried, use a butter knife or spoon to scrape off as much of the glue as possible. Don’t try and remove the whole patch of dried glue as this could cause your garment to rip. Instead, focus on removing the top, hard, layer of the stain. 

When you have removed your hard layer of glue, submerge your item in cold water for 24 hours. Make sure that your water is cold as hot water will only set the glue stain further into your clothing. The cold water will soften the remaining glue and make it easier to remove. 

After 24 hours, remove your garment from the cold water, and immediately pour a small amount of liquid laundry detergent directly onto your stain, and gently work it in with your fingers.  

Once you are satisfied that your liquid laundry detergent has been completely rubbed in, wash your garment as you usually would. If, after washing, your stain persists, repeat the process. 

To remove superglue stains you will need… 

  • A spoon or toothbrush
  • Acetone
  • Emery board or fine-grained sandpaper
  • A clean cloth or cotton wool pads
  • Laundry detergent 

As with removing water-based glue, you need to wait for your superglue stain to completely dry before beginning the removal process. Once your stain has completely dried, you can try and remove some of it using a spoon or butter knife, however, do not expect to lift much. 

Apply a small amount of acetone to a clean cloth or cotton wool pad, and gently dap your superglue stain on both sides of your garment. The acetone will break down the superglue, softening the stain and making it easier to lift from your clothing.

Once you notice the superglue becoming loose, use a dry, clean, cloth or toothbrush to gently brush away the loosened glue. You can repeat the acetone and brushing process as many times as necessary to remove the majority of your stain. 

If you notice that your stain is being particularly stubborn, you can use an emery board or fine-grained sandpaper to gently wear it down. Be very careful when doing this, as you want to lift the glue without damaging your clothes fibers. 

Finally, wash your garment as you usually would, checking that your stain has been completely lifted before drying it. If your stain has not been lifted, repeat the process. 

Photo by Erika Pugliese from Pexels

Grass

Whether you’re enjoying an Easter egg hunt in the garden or playing some Easter-themed sports, grass stains are inevitable when it comes to Easter fun. 

To remove grass stains you will need…

  • Cold water
  • Laundry detergent 
  • Rubbing alcohol (optional)
  • Hairspray (optional)

Begin the grass stain removal process by soaking your garment in cold water for 15 minutes. The cold water will soften the stain, and make it easier to lift. Make sure that your water is cold, as hot water will only set the stain further into your clothing. 

After 15 minutes, use your hands to rub laundry detergent directly onto your stain. You can use liquid detergent for this, however, powder detergent is particularly effective at removing stubborn outdoor stains.

Once you are satisfied that you have adequately rubbed your detergent into the stain, wash your item as you usually would. 

If your stain has not been completely lifted after washing, you may want to consider repeating the process or using rubbing alcohol or hairspray on your stain. The alcohol found in these products breaks down the green pigments in grass stains

If you are using rubbing alcohol, dab a small amount onto a clean cloth, and gently sponge it over your stain. When you see the colour lifting, rinse your garment in cold water and continue with the usual removal process. 

To use hairspray, spray a liberal amount over your stain and wait for it to completely dry. Once it has dried, used a soft-bristled brush, such as a toothbrush, to scrub at your stain. When you notice the colour begin to fade, flush out the hairspray with cold water, and continue with the usual stain removal process. 

Photo by Matthias Cooper from Pexels

Easter is supposed to be spent with friends and family, not worrying about doing the laundry. Book your Laundryheap service and let us take a load off. 

To book your Laundryheap service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to remove a chocolate stain

Chocolate is undoubtedly delicious, but, if on your clothes, can be difficult to remove. This is how you can remove a chocolate stain

  • New chocolate stains 
  • Old chocolate stains 
  • Dry clean only clothing

New chocolate stains

Regardless of the type of stain, it is always best to treat it as soon as possible. Chocolate stains are no different. 

To treat a new chocolate stain you will need…

  • A butter knife or spoon
  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent or dish soap
  • Stain remover gel or spray 
  • Cold water 

Begin removing your chocolate stain by using a butter knife or a spoon to remove any excess chocolate. Be careful whilst you are doing this. If you push too hard you can damage the fibres of your clothing and cause rips in the cloth. Be wary of spreading the chocolate to clean parts of your garment, you don’t want to accidentally make your stain bigger than it is. 

After you have removed as much of the excess chocolate as you can, rinse your stain with cold water. Make sure that you are running the cold water through the back of the stain so that the chocolate is pushed out through the fabric and not embedded deeper into it. Do not use warm or hot water during this step as that will only set the stain deeper into your fabric. 

Once you have flushed out your stain with cold water, gently rub a heavy-duty laundry detergent, or dish soap if you do not have laundry detergent, into the stain. Allow your stained garment to sit for 5 minutes and absorb the detergent or soap, before soaking it in cold water for 15 minutes. Whilst your stained clothing is soaking, gently rub the stained area between your fingers every 3-5 minutes to loosen the stain

Finally, using cold water, rinse out the stain, and wash your clothing as you usually would. If your stain is still present after you have washed your garment, try using a stain remover gel or spray on the stain, and repeat the previous steps. 

Old chocolate stains 

Chocolate stains will set with heat and time. If you notice a dark brown stain on an item of clothing, this could be an old chocolate stain. Despite the fact that these are harder to remove than fresh chocolate stains, it is not completely impossible. 

To treat an old chocolate stain you will need…

  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent or dish soap 
  • Cold water
  • Colour-safe non-chlorine bleach
  • Mild bleaching agent (if your stained clothing is white)

To begin removing your stain, rub some heavy-duty laundry detergent, or dish soap, directly onto the stain, and soak your garment in cold water for 30 minutes. Repeat this process until your stain becomes lighter in colour. 

Once you have completed soaking your stain, wash your garment with colour-safe non-chlorine bleach. If your stained item is white, you can use a mild bleaching agent, such as lemon juice

After your garment has been washed with your bleach, completely rinse your item, and wash it as you usually would. If your stain has not lifted, repeat the process. 

Photo by Radu Florin from Pexels

Dry clean only clothing 

If your stained item states that it is dry clean only on its care label, then seek the help of a professional dry cleaners.

When you book a Laundryheap service, simply tell us which item(s) is stained and where the stain(s) is, and we will take care of the rest. 

To book your Laundryheap service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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Keep your wedding dress clean on your big day

Photo by Emma Bauso from Pexels

If you’re getting married, firstly, congratulations, I sincerely hope that you have a long and happy marriage. Secondly, have you thought about how you’re going to keep your wedding dress clean on your big day? If not, here are some tips for you. 

  • Air your dress
  • Use stain protector on the hem of your dress
  • Put your dress on at the last minute
  • Step into your dress
  • Take a water spray bottle with you
  • Keep white chalk on hand
  • Recruit your bridal party to help 
  • Have an emergency kit on hand
  • Never rub a stain 
  • Have a post-wedding plan

Air your dress

On the morning of your wedding day, hang your dress somewhere out of the way from yourself and your bridal party. It is essential that you air out your wedding dress so that you can let any wrinkles fall. That being said, you don’t want it to be hung somewhere that risks it being stained. If possible, leave it in an empty bedroom, so it won’t be disturbed until the moment you put it on. 

Photo by Daniel Moises Magulado from Pexels

Use stain protector on the hem of your dress 

If you are wearing a floor-length wedding dress, it’s essential that you protect the hem of your gown. Even if you aren’t planning on wandering outside, your hem will be dragging across the floor all day and will become dirty if not protected. Buy a stain protector for the hem of your dress, but, be very careful when applying it. If you apply too much stain protector you may leave a stain, so apply only a small amount. 

Photo by Leah Kelley from Pexels

Put your dress on at the last minute 

Let your dress be the final step in your getting ready journey. This will limit the risk of makeup or hairspray stains ruining your wedding dress.  

Photo by Caleb Oquendo from Pexels

Step into your dress

When you are putting on your dress, it’s best to step into it so that it does not come into contact with your hair or makeup- this is to protect both the dress and your perfectly finessed hair and makeup. Finally, have your bridesmaids help you put your shoes on to avoid bending down and wrinkling your dress.

Photo by Terje Sollie from Pexels

Take a water spray bottle with you 

You don’t want your dress to look wrinkled in your wedding photos. To avoid this, have a spray water bottle with you at all times. If you spot a small wrinkle on your dress, simply spray a small amount of the water on to it, and said wrinkle will disappear. Be warned, water will not work on larger wrinkles. 

Photo by Danu Hidayatur Rahman from Pexels

Keep white chalk on hand 

As your wedding day progresses, there is an increased chance of your dress becoming stained. Chalk is a great way to get rid of oil-based stains, and, if your wedding dress is white, white chalk will help cover the stain. If you have an oil-based stain, simply rub a small amount of the chalk over the stain, and wait 15 minutes for the chalk to absorb the oil. After 15 minutes, brush the chalk off of your wedding dress, and continue with what will be one of the best days of your life.

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Recruit your bridal party to help 

Your bridal party is there to help, so use them to help you keep your wedding dress clean. Have two of them help you hold up your dress when you are walking over a particularly dirty section of flooring. Tell them to watch out for any stains that may drip onto your dress, and make sure that they know how to remove stains as fast as possible. Remember, it’s your day, and if you want your bridal party to help you keep your dress clean, then so be it. 

Photo by Jonathan Borba from Pexels

Have an emergency kit on hand

You can buy an emergency kit or make one yourself, either way, they are essential to have on your wedding day. Your emergency kit will have everything you will need for any wedding dress disaster. From a needle and thread to deal with rips in your dress to emergency crystals, your emergency kit will help with any wedding dress mishap. 

Photo by Terje Sollie from Pexels

Never rub a stain 

If you do get a stain on your wedding dress, and the chalk has not helped, do not rub it. Rubbing a stain will only set it further into your dress and may hinder it from being removed after your wedding day. Instead, try and cover the stain with alternative embellishments, such as flowers or crystals, or just own the fact that your dress is stained. It will come out eventually. There is no need to let a little stain ruin your big day. 

Photo by Jeremy Wong from Pexels

Have a post-wedding plan

It’s important to have a plan for how you are going to clean your wedding dress after your wedding. Do you want it cleaned professionally by a dry cleaner? Or would you prefer to try and wash it yourself? Whatever you want to do, it’s important that you think about it before your big day, so that you can treat any stains on your dress as soon as possible. 

Photo by Emma Bauso from Pexels

Enjoy your wedding day without having to worry too much about keeping your wedding dress clean. If you do get a few stains on it, don’t worry. Simply book your Laundryheap service and we can have it picked-up, pre-treated, dry-cleaned, and returned to you, within 24 hours. 

To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to remove hair dye stains

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Hair dye can be incredibly difficult to remove from clothing. If you have accidentally dripped some on yourself, this is how you can remove it. 

  • Before treating your stain
  • Black, brown, or blue hair dye 
  • Red hair dye

Before treating your stain

Before you begin treating your stain, check your item’s care label. If it says ‘dry-clean only’ do not treat the stain yourself. Instead, book your Laundryheap dry cleaning service and let us handle it. If your care label doesn’t say ‘dry-clean only’ you are safe to proceed. 

Black, brown, or blue hair dye

To treat your hair dye stain you will need…

  • A soft-bristled brush
  • Water
  • A basin 
  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent 
  • Oxygen-based bleach
  • Chlorine bleach (for white clothing)

Begin treating your stain by holding your garment under a cold water tap. This will help remove any hair dye lingering on the surface of your item. Make sure that you use cold water only as hot water will only aid the stain in setting further into your clothing

Next, pour a capful of heavy-duty laundry detergent over the stain and use a soft-bristled brush to gently rub it in. It’s best to use a laundry detergent with stain-lifting enzymes, so double check you are using the right detergent prior to pouring. Continue rubbing your stain for 5-15 minutes, or until you begin to see the hair dye become lighter in colour.

Once you are satisfied that your stain is a lighter colour, fill a basin with cold water and add oxygen-based bleach per the instructions on the packaging. Submerge your garment in the water and bleach mixture, making sure that the hair dye stain is completely in the water, and leave it to soak for at least 8 hours. 

After 8 hours, lift your item out of the water. If your stain has been removed, you can wash your item as you normally would. Should the stain remain, mix a fresh basin of cool water and oxygen-based bleach and leave your garment for another 8 hours. 

If your hair dye stain is on a white item of clothing and mix a solution of 1 gallon of water and 1-fourth a cup of chlorine bleach. Submerge your stained garment in this mixture, and leave it to soak for 15 minutes. Do not leave your item in the solution for any longer than 15 minutes as the chlorine bleach will begin to weaken the fabric. 

After 15 minutes, remove your item from the solution.

Removing red hair dye 

Red hair dye has a different composition than black, brown, or blue hair dye, and so the stain needs to be treated in a different way. 

To treat your hair dye stain you will need…

  • 2 soaking containers
  • Dishwashing liquid 
  • Ammonia
  • Distilled white vinegar 
  • Oxygen-based bleach 
  • Water 

As with removing black, brown, or blue hair dye, begin treatment by running your stained item under a cool water tap to remove any surface hair dye. 

Next, mix a solution of 1 quarter of water, one-half teaspoon of dishwashing liquid, and one tablespoon of ammonia, in a container. Submerge your stained garment in this solution and leave it to soak for 15 minutes. 

After 15 minutes, remove your garment from the solution and, using your fingers, rub the stained area. This will help loosen the hair dye and allow it to be removed from the fabric with greater ease. Once you have rubbed your stain for around 5-10 minutes, submerge it in the previously used solution for a further 15 minutes. 

Whilst your item is soaking, use a separate container to mix 1 quarter warm water with 1 quarter distilled white vinegar. Once your item has completed it’s 15-minute soak, rinse it well, and submerge it in your new solution. Leave your item to soak for 30 minutes. 

After 30 minutes, remove your garment from the solution. If your stain has been removed, wash your item as you usually would.

Should your stain remain, fill your sink with cold water and add oxygen-based bleach per the packet’s instructions. Submerge your stained item in the solution, and leave it to soak for 8 hours. If, after 8 hours, the stain has not been removed, repeat the process with fresh water and fresh oxygen-based bleach. 

The most effective way to remove any stain is to get it treated by a professional. When you book your Laundryheap service, let us know what item(s) of clothing is stained and where the stain(s) is located. To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to remove toothpaste stains

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

It’s easy to accidentally drip toothpaste onto your new suit or comfiest PJ’s. This is how you get that pesky stain out. 

  • White toothpaste
  • Whitening toothpaste 
  • Gel toothpaste

White toothpaste 

White toothpaste contains titanium dioxide, which is the chemical that makes it look white. If you use white toothpaste, water will not be enough to lift the stain it leaves behind.

What you’ll need

  • A blunt object, such as a spoon 
  • A clean cloth
  • Liquid laundry detergent

Begin by using your blunt object to remove excess toothpaste from your clothing. Try and use an upwards motion when doing this to avoid spreading the loose particles to other parts of your clothing. 

Once you have sufficiently removed the top layer of the stain, slightly dampen a clean cloth and blot the area. This will help loosen the stain and aid in it being lifted from your clothing. 

Next, work a small amount of liquid laundry detergent onto your toothpaste stain. Make sure that the detergent is spread over the entirety of the stain so that the whole area can be lifted. 

After you have adequately rubbed in your detergent, wash your stained item of clothing in your washing machine as usual. 

If your toothpaste stain has not been completely removed after washing, repeat the full process again. 

Image by wei zhu from Pixabay

Whitening toothpaste 

Whitening toothpaste usually contains a mild bleaching agent that works to whiten your teeth. This bleaching agent can cause discoloration on coloured and dark clothing if it is left for an extended period of time. To remove a whitening toothpaste stain you need to follow the exact process of removing a white toothpaste stain, however, you need to act as soon as you notice the stain to avoid excessive discolouration to your clothing. 

Image by Marco Verch Professional P

Gel toothpaste 

Gel toothpaste contains dye to make it a blue/green colour. This dye can discolour your white clothing if left for too long. As soon as you notice a gel toothpaste stain you need to follow the same procedure as removing a regular toothpaste stain. Once you have washed your stained item of clothing, dry your garment in direct sunlight. Sunlight has natural bleaching qualities and can help even out any discolouration. 

If you have a toothpaste stain, or any stain, that you can not get rid of, let us help you. If you tell us what items of clothing are stained we will take extra precautions to help lift the stain and deliver your clothes back to you stain-free. To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to remove coffee stains

One minute you’re drinking a coffee, the next, you’re looking down to see a coffee stain on your top. This is how to remove those pesky coffee stains. 

  • Removing coffee stains from synthetic fabrics
  • Removing coffee stains from cotton
  • Using Laundryheap

Removing coffee stains from synthetic fabrics 

Synthetic fabric is any fabric that is man-made as opposed to natural. This includes acrylic, nylon, and polyester. These materials are fairly durable when compared to natural fabrics, so coffee stains are fairly easy to remove. 

You will need…

  • A dry cloth
  • A sponge
  • Warm water
  • Dishwashing detergent 
  • White vinegar 
  • Rubbing alcohol

Begin by blotting the stain with a dry cloth. This will lift any of the excess coffee on the fabric. Remember to blot rather than rub as rubbing will only force the stain further into your fabric. 

Next, create a solution of 1 quarter warm water, half a teaspoon of dish-washing detergent, and one tablespoon of white vinegar. Once made, let your stain soak in the solution for 15 minutes. 

After 15 minutes has passed, remove your stained item from the solution and rinse with warm water. You should notice that the stain is a lighter colour as you wash the solution off. 

Once the solution has been washed off, use a sponge to dab rubbing alcohol onto the remainder of the stain. This will help to lift what is left of the coffee. 

Finally, wash your garment as you usually would. Once washed, if you notice that the stain has not been completely removed, repeat the process again. 

Removing coffee stains from cotton

Cotton, although a natural fabric, is strong. There are two methods that can be used to remove coffee stains from cotton or linen. 

For method one you will need…

  • A dry cloth
  • Warm water
  • Dishwashing detergent 
  • White vinegar
  • A sponge
  • Rubbing alcohol

This method is exactly the same as removing coffee stains from synthetic fabrics. The only difference in this method is that you have to rinse the rubbing alcohol off of your cotton before washing as usual. 

For method two you will need…

  • A rubber band
  • A large bowl
  • A temperature display kettle

Begin by stretching your stained cotton over a large bowl. Secure the material over the bowl with your rubber band. 

After securing your material, boil your temperature display kettle to 200 degrees Fahrenheit. Once boiled pour the water over the stain. Be careful whilst doing so, you don’t want to burn yourself. 

If the stain does not instantly disappear, try pouring fresh water over the stain. 

It is important to note that near-boiling water is safe for cotton, however, can damage some dyes that may have been used on your clothing. To avoid damage to your whole garment you may want to pre-test this method on an inconspicuous part of the item, such as the seam. 

Using Laundryheap

The best way to treat any stain is by using a professional dry cleaning service. If you have a coffee stain, or any other stain, that needs to be treated book a Laundryheap slot. Simply select your service and write in the comments which items are stained and by what, and leave the rest to us. 

To book your Laundryheap dry cleaning slot head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. We are fully operational in London, Birmingham, Manchester, Coventry, Amsterdam, Doha, Kuwait City, Dublin, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah, Singapore, Boston, New York City, Manama, and, most recently, Rotterdam, and The Hague.  


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Everything you need to know about colour run stains

Image by Aqua Mechanical

When the colours of your clothing bleed together, this is known as a colour run. Colour runs are very common, and this is everything you need to know about them. 

  • Why do colour run stains occur?
  • The colourfastness test
  • How to prevent colour runs 
  • How to get rid of colour run stains

Why do colour run stains occur? 

The brightly coloured clothing that we buy has been dyed using colour pigments. In order for our clothes to remain a vibrant colour, the colour pigments of the dye must be securely attached to the fabric. Colour run occurs when the coloured pigments have not been adequately attached to the fabric. When these inadequately attached pigments come into contact with water, the dye begins to run and can transfer onto other items of clothing. Colour run stains are most apparent when washing isn’t separated. If a darker item of clothing begins to run, it can be damaging to lighter colours of clothing.

Image by Mark Hillary

The colourfastness test

The most effective way to test if your clothing will run in the wash is by using the colourfastness test. This test should be carried out before you wash your item with any other clothing. 

Begin the test by selecting a hidden section of your item, such as the hem or seam. Dampen that section and lay something absorbent on the spot, such as a white paper towel or handkerchief. Next, iron on top of the absorbent material. If the colour from your item bleeds onto the absorbent material than your item is not colourfast and therefore could stain any other clothing it is washed with. 

Image by Marco Verch Professional Photographer and Speaker

How to prevent colour runs 

The best way to minimise the damage of colour run stains is by washing the same, or similar, coloured clothing together. This will mean that, should your colours run in the wash, there will not be a dramatic impact made to your other items in the wash in turns of colour difference. 

It is important to remember that hot water opens the fibres in clothing, therefore encouraging any non-colourfast clothing to run. The best way to combat this issue is to wash your clothing in cold water. 

Finally, to prevent colour runs, don’t leave your washing in a wet pile or in your washing machine, whilst wet, for a long period of time. This encourages any non-colourfast clothing to run and potentially stain multiple items of your clothing.

How to get rid of colour run stains 

If your colours have run and the stain is noticeable the best thing to do is treat the stain as soon as possible. Put your stained item back into the washing machine, on its own, and wash it again using laundry detergent. As long as you act fast, ideally when the item is still wet, the stain should remove itself. If washing your stained item using normal laundry detergent does not treat the stain, you can find specific stain remover laundry detergents. 

If your colour run was particularly bad, don’t forget to put your washing machine on an empty spin to clean out your machine and avoid any damage to the clothes you put in later. 

The best way to avoid colour run stains is by letting us launder your clothes for you. Book your Laundryheap service by visiting the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app. We are now servicing Boston, including Boston City, Cambridge, Somerville and Brookline.