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How to find your dream Singapore home

Photo by Kelly Lacy from Pexels

Finding your dream Singapore home is hard. It’s exciting and scary all at the same time. That is why we have devised this ‘How To’ guide to help you narrow down your search. 

  • Set a budget
  • Choose an area
  • Discuss facilities
  • Look at the amenities
  • Do some research
  • Get the feeling
  • Use Casa Mia Coliving

Set a budget

The first step in finding your dream Singapore home is to set a budget. Have a frank and honest discussion, evaluate your financial situation, and set a realistic price range for your home. This will help you to narrow your search by eliminating properties that are over your budget.

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Choose an area

Your next task is to choose the area that you would like to move to. Singapore is a beautiful location, but each area has something different to offer. For example, Marina Bay is within walking distance of the Singapore Business District, and therefore the perfect location for working professionals. Defining an area for your dream house could be based on price, amenities, work, or relationships. Whatever your reason for choosing an area, defining a specific location for your house-hunt will streamline your search.

Photo by Jahoo Clouseau from Pexels

Discuss facilities

Facilities are a large part of finding your dream home. Make a list of all of the facilities you want in your dream home, perhaps splitting your list into dealbreakers and non-essentials, and refer to your list when you go on viewings. You will find that there are some facilities that you will be willing to live without for the perfect house, whereas others are essentials that could turn a supposedly perfect house into the wrong one. 

Look at the amenities 

Amenities, such as schools, restaurants, and shops, could be a deciding factor for the area you choose to search and are imperative to look at before deciding on your dream home. Important local amenities will be different for each individual, so prioritise the amenities that you view as important. For example, if you have, or want, children, schools and parks may be an important local amenity for you and your family. 

Photo by David McBee from Pexels

Do some research

Whilst finding your dream home, go the extra mile and do some research into the area you will be moving to. A quick search on the internet, talking to people, and spending some time in the area can be all it takes to decide whether your dream home is right for you. It’s better to do your research now before papers are signed rather than later. 

Photo by Christina Morillo from Pexels

Get the feeling

No matter how much research and preparation you do, the most important thing to consider when finding your dream home is how you feel about it. Take the time to view various properties and evaluate how you feel at each one. You may find that the one that feels like home is the one you least expected. Keep an open mind and follow your feelings.

Photo by Teona Swift from Pexels

Use Casa Mia Coliving

If you are a young professional, you may struggle to find the time to look for your dream Singapore home. Luckily, Casa Mia Coliving provides the perfect solution. Casa Mia is a coliving property manager offering private bedrooms in shared homes with a convenient search process and a great community. They offer affordable accommodation, with flexible terms, and all the services you need to just move in and start enjoying your new place.

You can now get 5% off of your first three months when you use the code LAHP5. Head to https://www.casamia.co/page/singapore to see what’s available and use the code LAHP5  in the request form on each of your chosen homes. 

Whilst you are busy searching for your dream Singapore home, don’t let your laundry pile up, let us take care of it for you. Book your Laundryheap order today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Singapore travel essentials

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Packing for a Singapore trip takes careful planning and consideration. Luckily, we have outlined some of the essentials it is vital for you to pack. 

  • Passport/ ID card
  • Guidebook 
  • Suncream 
  • Mosquito repellent
  • Water bottle
  • Travel adapter
  • Portable charger
  • Practical footwear
  • A day pack
  • Plenty of clothing

Passport/ ID card 

You will need your passport to get into Singapore, but even after entering the country, it’s best to carry it around with you. Singapore is an extremely safe country, and if you are out late at night you may be asked to show your ID to police officers. It’s always best to be prepared and keep it on your person at all times. 

Photo by Porapak Apichodilok from Pexels

Guidebook 

There is an abundance of things to see and do in Singapore. To get the most out of your experience, buy yourself a guidebook before your trip and highlight areas that you would like to explore. Guidebooks are incredibly useful for not only showing what there is to see and do in Singapore but also providing cultural information and even a couple of phrases you can use. 

Photo by Element5 Digital from Pexels

Suncream

It is warm year-round in Singapore, with it being particularly sunny from May to July. Regardless of the time of year you visit, make sure that you pack plenty of suncream to protect you from the sun’s rays. The average temperature in Singapore is 26 degrees celsius, so adequate sun precautions must be taken. 

Photo by RF._.studio from Pexels

Mosquito repellent

Singapore is a tropical country and, as previously mentioned, has a warm and humid climate. These are prime conditions for mosquitos. To prevent yourself from being bitten by mosquitos whilst traveling, have mosquito repellent on hand. All mosquito repellents work differently, so always check the label for directions on how much and how often to use it. 

Image by Mike Mozart

Water bottle

Regardless of the activities you have decided to participate in whilst in Singapore, you will be doing a lot of walking and spending a lot of time outdoors. To help combat Singapore’s hot and humid climate, make sure that you always have a water bottle on hand at all times. It’s important to stay hydrated. 

Photo by Gustavo Fring from Pexels

Travel adapter 

No matter where you are traveling to, it’s always wise to take a travel adapter so that you can plug in any appliances you may need. In Singapore, they use three plug types: plug type C, which has 2 rounded pins, plug type G, which has three rectangular pins in a triangular formation, and plug type M, which has three rounded pins. 

Photo by Markus Spiske from Pexels

Portable charger 

Singapore is overflowing with things to see and do, and it’s handy to have a fully charged phone whilst exploring. It’s always best to have at least a small amount of charge on your phone for emergencies, so a portable charger will come in extremely handy when you’re out for long days. 

Photo by Lukas from Pexels

Practical footwear 

As previously mentioned, there is a high chance that you will be doing a lot of walking whilst in Singapore, which is why it’s best to take comfortable and practical footwear. Trainers are ideal for walking long distances, however, if you are going on hikes, hiking boots may be a better alternative. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

A day pack

It’s important to keep all of your everyday essentials, such as your phone, money, and mini first aid kit, with you at all times. The best way to transport these essentials is in a small backpack or day pack. Your day pack should be lightweight, but big enough to carry all of your essentials. It’s important to find a day pack that is secure so any thievery is avoided. 

Photo by Sebastian Voortman from Pexels

Plenty of clothing

It may seem like an obvious point to make, but it is important that you pack plenty of clothing for your Singapore trip. The weather in Singapore can be intensely warm, so it’s vital to pack clothing that is lightweight and comfortable, whilst keeping you protected from the sun. If you are traveling to Singapore to experience both the day and nightlife, it is important to pack a few evening wear outfits, as well as clothing suitable for daytime walks and exploring. Be smart with what you pack. 

Photo by Monstera from Pexels

Before you travel to Singapore, or even whilst you are staying, let Laundryheap take care of all of your laundry for you. We can pick up, dry clean, and re-deliver your clothing to you, wherever you are. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your order. 


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Must-see Singapore sights

Photo by Kin Pastor from Pexels

Singapore is over-flowing with beautiful sights to see. These are just 10 of our favourites. 

  • Merlion Park
  • Gardens by the Bay
  • Botanic Gardens
  • Singapore Flyer
  • Chinatown
  • Sentosa Island 
  • Treetop walk at MacRitchie Reservoir
  • Lau Pa Sat market 
  • Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve
  • Pulau Ubin 

Merlion Park 

Merlion Park is one of Singapore’s most famous attractions. Located on the promenade overlooking Marina Bay, you will find the iconic 28-foot Merlion statue, shooting water into the bay. The half-lion half-fish statue is symbolic of Singapore’s beginnings as a fishing village, and a nod to ‘Singapura’, which translates to ‘Lion City’ in Malay. As one of Singapore’s most famous attractions for tourists, the area is always busy, so it may be best to view it later on in the day when there are fewer people, and both the Merlion and Marina Bay are lit up. 

Photo by Adhitya Andanu from Pexels

Gardens by the Bay 

Spread across 250 acres of land, Gardens by the Bay is a colourful and futuristic green space right in the middle of Marina Bay.  Undoubtedly, the stars of the Gardens by the Bay are their 18 Supertrees. 158,000 plants, of more than 700 species, cover the 18 Supertrees that tower over the park at 224 feet. Asides from the Supertrees, you will find the largest indoor waterfall, flowing at 114-feet, the Flower Dome hosting spectacular events, such as Tulipmania, and the Cloud Forest, which mimics the cool and moist ecology of the tropical highlands. The beautifully futuristic, and architecturally stunning, Gardens by the Bay is definitely worth a visit whilst you are in Singapore. 

Botanic Gardens 

Keeping with the greenery theme, Singapore’s Botanic Gardens make for a beautiful and peaceful visit. Singapore was awarded its first UNESCO World Heritage nomination for their Botanic Gardens, the first and only tropical botanic garden on the World Heritage list. The Gardens were designed with four cores- Tanglin, Central, Bukit Timah, and Tyersall Gallop. Within these 4 cores are an array of gardens with a multitude of different plants, including 48 species of Bonsai. It is the perfect place to stroll, relax, and admire the variety of plants that Singapore has to offer.

Image by Katie Hannan

Singapore Flyer

If you want to take in the whole of Singapore, it’s worth riding the Singapore Flyer- the world’s largest observation wheel. As you rise into the sky on a 30-minute journey, you can take in the sights of Singapore, whilst learning fun-facts about the country and its origins. If you want to ride in style, you can book Sky Dining, and enjoy a 4-course meal whilst taking in the beauty of Singapore. Alternatively, sip on a Singapore Sling or glass of Champagne whilst riding the wheel and appreciating the stunning views that Singapore has to offer. 

Photo by Ngrh Mei from Pexels

Chinatown 

Singapore’s Chinatown is a testament to the influence that China had on Singapore’s past. The streets are lined with red lanterns, and there is an abundance of restaurants selling authentic Chinese food. Nestled within Chinatown, you will find the Chinese Heritage Centre and beautiful temples. As you walk the streets, you will notice heritage markers that were installed to better explain the importance of the area. These markers have been translated into English, Japanese, and Chinese, and are worth reading to better understand both the area and the country. 

Image by Khalzuri Yazid

Sentosa Island

If you’re looking to relax on the beach, then head to Sentosa Island. Located 10-20 minutes away from Singapore’s city centre, Sentosa Island offers all the fun of a beach holiday, a stones-throw away from the city. Whether you are looking to relax on the beach, or try something a little bit more adventurous, there is something for everyone. On the Island, you will also find the Underwater World aquarium where you are given the opportunity to swim with dolphins. 

Image by Uwe Schwarzbach

Treetop Walk at MacRitchie Reservoir

There are several beautiful hiking routes in MacRitchie, and the Treetop Walk is the highlight of them all. The free-standing, 250m long, suspension bridge connects the two highest points in MacRitchie, Bukit Peirce and Bukit Kalang. As you hike across the bridge, you get a birds eye view of the vast array of plants and animals that inhabit the forest canopy. This 2 hour hike is the prime opportunity to observe the nature and beauty of Singapore whilst exploring the forest. 

Lau Pa Sat market 

Lau Pa Sat market is a Singapore landmark and national monument. Found in the heart of the financial district, the striking octagonal shape of the market is a spectacle in itself. It’s sweeping arches and columns are not dissimilar to it’s original structure of the 17th century. Nestled within the market is an array of culinary delights. The aroma of Singapore surrounds you as you pass from stall to stall and sample the local delicacies on offer. There is an old-world charm to Lau Pa Sat market that should not be missed. 

Image by William Cho

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve

Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve is Singapore’s ecological gem. Covering 87 hectares of land, the wetlands are a chance to see a multitude of animals in their natural habitat, including otters, kingfishers, crabs, and migrating birds. First discovered in 1986 by avid birdwatchers, the Singapore government designated the Wetland Reserve as a nature park in 1989 and has been welcoming eco-tourists since 1993. You can wander the Wetlands solo, or take a free guided tour. If you are a lover of nature, the Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve should be at the top of your list. 

Image by cattan2011

Pulau Ubin 

Pulau Ubin offers a look into Singapore’s past. Located a short 15-minute boat ride away, it is an idyllic place to unwind away from Singapore City. Originally known as Pulau Batu Jubin, the island’s granite quarries provided the stone used to construct the Istana and the Singapore-Johore Causeway. Now, visitors can admire coconut rubber plantations, fish farms, and Singapore’s last remaining kampong (traditional village). As you trek the island, you will come across an array of different habitats, including seagrass lagoons and mangroves. With each new habitat, comes various different species of wildlife. If you are interested in exploring a new island, you can take a day trip to Pulau Ubin, or spend a little bit longer getting to know the island. 

Image by William Cho

Don’t let your laundry prevent you from fully exploring all of the wondrous sights that Singapore has to offer. Let Laundryheap sort out your laundry for you. You can book your service, and, whilst you are busy exploring, we will collect your laundry, launder it for you, and have it returned within 24 hours. 

To book your Laundryheap service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Top tips for doing laundry while in Southeast Asia

If you are travelling around Southeast Asia for an extended period of time, you will need to do laundry. Here are some top tips on how to do so.

  • Pack smartly
  • Travel with mini laundry detergents
  • Don’t forget a laundry bag 
  • Never use hotels
  • Bring a makeshift clothesline 
  • Dry your clothes inside
  • Carry plenty of coins 
  • Plan your laundry time
  • The bag method 
  • Laundryheap

Pack smartly

The most important thing to remember is to pack light and pack materials that are easy to wash. There are several ways to do laundry in Southeast Asia, from using a launderettes to washing your clothes in the sink, regardless of the method you decide to use you don’t want to spend an extended period of time, or money, doing it. In addition, it’s best to pack clothes that are durable and easy to wash, such as cotton

Image by Stefan Coders from Pixabay

Travel with mini laundry detergents 

There are several launderettes across Southeast Asia that you can use. To make your laundry experience quick and easy, travel with mini laundry detergents. They are pre-measured for one or two washes, and will prevent you from having to carry, or buy, a full-sized detergent that you will not use. 

Don’t forget a laundry bag

Laundry bags are handy to take wherever you travel to. As soon as an item of your clothing is dirty, simply put it in your laundry bag so that you can differentiate between your clean and dirty clothes. As soon as your laundry bag is full, or you are running low on clean clothes, you can decide how best to clean them. In addition, if your clothing is still wet or damp, but you need to pack them away, putting your clothes in your laundry bag will prevent the smell of damp clothing spreading to your other packed belongings. 

Never use hotels 

If you are staying in a hotel whilst travelling around Southeast Asia there will more than likely be a laundry service provided. Do not use it. Hotel laundry services will usually charge per item of clothing that needs to be laundered rather than by weight. This can result in an extortionate laundry bill by the time you have washed all of your clothes. It may be convenient to use the hotels services, but, if you are looking to save some money, its best to look around for local launderettes or alternative ways to wash your clothes. 

Image by John

Bring a makeshift clothes line 

Unless you know that there are tumble dryers available where you are planning to wash your clothes, it’s always best to pack a makeshift clothes line. Your clothesline can be something as simple as some strong rope, as long as you have something that you can hang your clothes on to dry. Some laundrettes will have clothes lines available for you to use, however, this is not a guarantee so it’s always better to bring your own.

Dry your clothes inside 

Southeast Asia is known for its warm and sunny climate, however, it is also extremely humid. If you are planning on hanging your clothes out to dry, it’s best to do so indoors rather than outside. The humidity from the air will slow down the drying process, making it more time efficient to simply hang your clothing in your hostel/hotel room. 

Carry plenty of coins 

There is no shortage of coin-operated laundrettes in Southeast Asia, but you have to make sure that you have the coins to use them. There is nothing worse than turning up to a laundrettes, filling a machine with your washing, only to find out that you don’t have enough coins to operate the machine. To save yourself the hassle, make sure that you have plenty of coins with you to get your washing done. 

Plan your laundry time 

If you are going to do laundry whilst in Southeast Asia it’s best to plan your time effectively. There are a lot of things you need to consider, such as drying times, pick-up times, and when laundrettes are opened. Plan your method of laundry prior to going on your travels and it will help you manage your laundry time much more efficiently.

The bag method 

This is a slightly unusual method for doing laundry, but is a handy alternative if you do not have access to a laundrette. 

For the bag method you will need a vinyl bag, water, and laundry detergent. 

Begin by filling your vinyl bag until it is half filled and put your clothes in it. Next, add in your detergent and let your clothes soak for a few minutes. After a few minute, use a plunging motion to rotate your clothing. Once you are satisfied with the cleanliness of your clothing, take each item out and rinse off the detergent with water. 

Laundryheap 

If you don’t want to take care of your clothing yourself whilst travelling in Southeast Asia, use Laundryheap. We will pick up, dry clean, and re-deliver your laundry to you, completely contactless, and on you schedule. 

To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Top places to eat in Singapore

Image by Eric Lee from Pixabay

Singapore is home to some of the best cuisine in the world. Here are just ten of the top restaurants we would recommend trying whilst in Singapore. 

  • Candlenut
  • 328 Katong Laska 
  • Sushi Kimura 
  • Burnt Ends 
  • Keng Eng Kee Seafood
  • Warong Nasi Pariaman 
  • Corner House
  • Samy’s Curry
  • J.B Ah Meng 
  • Spring Court

Candlenut

Candlenut was the first Peranakan restaurant to earn a Michelin star. At Candlenut, Singaporean chef Malcolm Lee taps into his heritage to deliver his modern interpretation of traditional Chinese cuisine. Many of the recipes you can sample have been passed down through generations and you can taste the heritage of each dish in every bite. Make sure to try the bakwan kepiting. 

Image by benhosg_old

328 Katong Laksa

Laksa is a popular spicy noodle soup, and there is nowhere better to get it than at Katong Laksa. If you are looking for a fancy dining experience you won’t find it here, but if you are looking for delicious, authentic, Singaporean food, you have come to the right place. The menu at 328 Katong Laksa is limited, so making your choice is fast and easy- perfect for enjoying your noodles as quickly as possible. 

Sushi Kimura 

Chef and owner of Sushi Kimura, Tomoo Kimura, has over 20 years of sushi-crafting experience. He offers an incredible Japanese sushi experience, that includes artisan ingredients that change with the seasons. Since Sushi Kimura gained its Michelin star it has become increasingly popular, so it’s best to book a table in advance.

Image by Ella Olsson

Burnt Ends

If you are a fan of BBQ then you have to try Burnt Ends, Singapore’s best BBQ joint. Surrounded by a burnt wood and iron exterior, you immediately become immersed in the BBQ experience as you sit facing a line of chefs intensely BBQing chunks of meat. Everyday the menu changes, with only a few staple dishes remaining all season, such as the pulled-pork Sanger.

Keng Eng Kee Seafood

Keng Eng Kee Seafood offers cooked-to-order wok-fried dishes. You will find everything here, from moonlight hor fun to Singapore’s best claypot pork liver.  Located on Bukit Merah Lane, it is constantly buzzing with people trying to secure a seat so make sure that you book well in advance. 

Image by Choo Yut Shing

Warong Nasi Pariaman 

Having served nasi padang since 1948, Warong Nasi Pariaman is the longest-running nasi padang joint in Singapore. At this Halal-certified restaurant, you can find traditional dishes such as ayam bakar, barbecued chicken served in thick coconut gravy, and sambal goreng, a type of spicy stir fry. It is important to note that because this restaurant is Halal there is no alcohol served on the premises.

Image by Shi Lin Tan from Pixabay

 Corner House 

Corner House resides in the historic home of a 20th century British Botanist, which is very fitting with the botanical theme of the restaurant. Singaporean chef, Jason Tan, showcases his gastro-botanical menu in his residence, which is built from the finest ingredients from across the world. The highlight of his eclectic menu is the Cevennes Onion, which is built using several different methods of cooking onions. 

Image by Jack at Wikipedia

Samy’s Curry 

Samy’s Curry was opened in the 1950’s, and continues to be run by the same family today. At Samy’s Curry, you will find an array of classic, home-style, curry’s, including chicken masala and fish cutlets. This is far from a fine-dining experience as servers ladle curry and rice onto sheets of banana leaves. It is recommended that you enjoy your curry with your hands. Sinks are provided at the back of the restaurant so that you can adequately clean yourself up at the end. 

Image by su-lin

J.B. Ah Meng

If you want a true taste of Singapore, head to J.B. Ah Meng. There is nothing fancy about this restaurant, however, it is where Singapore chefs come for their post-work meal, so you know it’s good. You will find J.B. Ah Meng in the heart of Singapore’s red-light district, in a simply furnished, two-story building. For the best tze char in Singapore, head to J.B. Ah Meng and enjoy the relaxing setting. 

Image by City Foodsters

Spring Court 

Spring Court is Singapore’s oldest family-owned restaurants. It sells traditional dishes that have been served for generations, including deep-fried boneless chicken and prawn paste, and crab meat rolls stuffed with chicken liver and salted egg. Originally, Spring Court was a purely Cantonese restaurant, but, as Singapore began to diversify, so did Spring Court. This restaurant offers a wonderful reflection on Singaporean food and how it has developed over the years, whilst holding onto its traditional roots.

Image by Choo Yut Shing

Whilst you enjoy the amazing foods of Singapore, we will take care of your laundry. Book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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Tourists tips when visiting Singapore

Image by Jason Goh from Pixabay

If you have booked yourself a trip to Singapore these tourist tips will help you make the most of your holiday. 

  • Pack smart
  • Hostels and hotels
  • Know the law
  • Use public transportation
  • Carry cash
  • Eat like a local
  • Stick to happy hour
  • Be smart with tipping
  • Head to the free attractions
  • Ride the Singapore Flyer

Pack smart 

Singapore is not only hot but also incredibly humid all year round. You need to pack lightweight clothing, such as cotton and linen, that will be comfortable and won’t stick to your skin. Asides from comfortable, lightweight clothing, make sure that you also pack some waterproofs. Rain is a common occurrence in Singapore, and when it rains it comes down hard.

Hostels and hotels  

Singapore is much more expensive than many other Asian cities, which means their hotels are also incredibly expensive. If money is no object on your Singapore holiday, there is an array of luxury hotels that offer 5-star rooms, complete with breathtaking views. If you are looking for cheaper accommodation for your stay, there are plenty of hostels scattered throughout the city. 

Top tourist tip: If you are travelling to Singapore during the peak holiday season make sure that you book your accommodation in advance. 

Know the law 

Singapore is rated as one of the safest cities in the world. This status has only been achieved due to its many laws and regulations, some of which are harsher than others. Before travelling to Singapore, make sure that you have a base knowledge of the rules and regulations that you must abide by or you may find yourself with a $500 fine for eating on the MRT (Singapore’s subway system).

Use public transportation  

The easiest, and cheapest, way to explore Singapore is by using public transport. Singapore MRT (Mass Rapid Transit) is the equivalent to a tube or subway- it can get you pretty much wherever you want to go. If you aren’t a fan of underground transportation, Singapore has a collection of buses that you can hop on and off at leisure. To make your journeys around Singapore easier, buy a Tourist Pass. You can choose either a 1,2 or 3-day pass, and once bought you can use the pass to get on all of Singapore’s public transport. Simply tap your pass, and away you go. 

Carry cash 

Like many countries, Singapore is making the move to becoming cashless. This being said, there are still areas where only cash is accepted. In places such as residential shops and kopi-tiams eateries (coffee shops), there are no card machines for card and contactless payments. It’s always best to carry between $50 and $100 with you just in case. 

Eat like a local 

Singapore is home to some of the best food in the world, and the place to find that food is the food centres and hawker stalls around China Town and Marina Bay. Here you will find local delicacies, such as chili crab and laksa, at affordable prices. These informal eateries will provide you will a high-quality meal without having to spend a fortune. Even if money is not an object on your holiday, make sure to have at least one local meal. 

Stick to happy hour  

Alcohol is incredibly expensive in Singapore. On average, a cocktail will set you back $20, whilst a beer can cost upwards of $10. That being said, from 5 pm to 9 pm, in bars across the city happy hour drastically reduces the price of these alcoholic drinks. If you are looking for an evening tipple, but don’t want to spend a fortune, make sure to check out the happy hour deals that are on offer. 

Be smart with tipping 

Unlike countries such as America, in Singapore, it is not mandatory to tip. This means that you do not have to add service charge on top of your meal. That being said, if you do think that the service was particularly good, it is always appreciated when a tip is given. 

Head to the free attractions 

As already established, Singapore is an expensive city for a holiday. That being said, there are plenty of free activities and attractions that will save you some money. Some of the free attractions to visit include the multitude of parks throughout the city, Chinese and Indian temples, the Singapore Botanical Gardens, and the Festive Light-up’s. 

Ride The Singapore Flyer

The Singapore Flyer is an amazing way to get panoramic views of the city. At 165 meters tall, it is one of the highest Ferris wheels in the world. One full rotation will take 30 minutes to complete, in which time you can view the whole city. An adult ticket is $33, and tickets can be bought on the day, however, there are online discounts available. Just be sure that you aren’t afraid of heights before taking on the wheel. 

Whilst holidaying in Singapore, let us take care of your laundry. We can pick up your laundry from your accommodation and, whilst you enjoy the city, we can have your clothes dry cleaned and re-delivered to you. To book your service simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.