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Laundry room space savers

Image by Christian Brothers

No matter how large your laundry room is, it never seems big enough. Mountains of washing, hefty boxes of laundry detergent scattered across every surface, an ironing board against one wall, and a washing machine taking up another. Does this sound familiar? No matter how large your laundry room is, these space savers can help you keep it clean, tidy, and, most importantly, manageable for doing your laundry. 

  • Hanging bars
  • Wall-mounted drying rack
  • Foldaway drying rack 
  • Floating shelves
  • Countertop 
  • Coat hooks
  • Door storage 
  • Glass jars
  • Folding laundry basket
  • Stack appliances

Hanging bars 

The easiest way to maximize the space of even the smallest laundry room is by using the walls. Tension rods are excellent for air-drying clothing or hanging clean washing ready to transfer to the wardrobe. Installing a few tension rods to the walls of your laundry room will free up space, whilst also providing wet clothes with more room to air dry, therefore speeding up the drying process. 

Image by Christian Brothers

Wall-mounted drying rack 

If you are short on drying space, a wall-mounted drying rack could be the solution. You can purchase these racks in a variety of different sizes, depending on your needs and budget. Once purchased, simply attach your drying rack to the wall, and start adding your wet laundry. Before adding your wet laundry, make sure that your drying rack has been securely attached to your wall as you don’t want it falling off. 

Foldaway drying rack

An alternative to the wall-mounted drying rack is a foldaway one. Foldaway drying racks can be unfolded and placed in your laundry room whilst your clothing dries, and, once it has served its purpose, collapsed and stored away. These drying racks are often folded to a slim size, so would easily fit in a gap in your laundry room. What is more, foldaway drying racks can fit a full load of laundry on them and are very reasonably priced. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Floating shelves

Another way to utilise the wall space in your laundry room is to install floating shelves. A floating shelf is a great way to store your laundry products, such as detergents and drying sheets, or even clean clothing that needs to be put away. You can install your floating shelves at varying heights so if you are using them to store laundry products you can keep them out of reach of children, or, alternatively, you can place them lower down so that they are accessible to everyone. 

Countertop

Countertops are incredibly useful in laundry rooms for folding clothes, transferring clothes from the washer to tumble dryer, and simply placing things on whilst you are using them. You can install a countertop over your washing machine and tumble dryer to utilise space, and make it easier to transfer clothes from one machine to the next. 

Image by countrykitty

Coat hooks

Coat hooks can be hung individually or in strips, depending on the amount of wall space you want to take up and what you want to hang from them. A clever use for coat hooks is to hang your ironing board on the wall. Ironing boards can be hefty and not overly compact, so hanging them on the wall via coat hooks is a great way to utilise wall space and prevent it from taking up vital laundry room space. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Door storage

Every area of your laundry room can be utilised as storage, including your door. Door storage is very useful for storing smaller items, such as hand towels, laundry pods, or bottles of fabric softener. Often, the storage will simply hang over your door and drape down the length of it with small pockets or shelves to store items. They are usually very economical so are a perfect storage option, even for those on a tight budget. 

Photo by Darcy Lawrey from Pexels

Glass jars

If you buy your laundry detergent in bulk or make your own, glass jars are perfect for storing it. Rather than having boxes of detergent scattered around your laundry room, buy a few big glass jars and put them on a shelf, or even on top of your washing machine. They are much more elegant looking than cardboard boxes and will save you a massive amount of space. If you prefer to use liquid laundry detergent, you can buy glass bottles. 

Image by Susan

Folding laundry basket 

Laundry baskets seem to always be in the middle of the laundry room, taking up space, and being a potential trip hazard. A folding laundry basket not only limits the risk of tripping, but also means that once you are finished with it you can simply fold it and store it away until you need it again.

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Stack appliances 

If you have both a washing machine and a tumble dryer, save space by stacking them on top of each other rather than having them side by side. This will give you more space in your laundry room, plus make it easier to transfer clothes from one machine to the next. These types of appliances tend to be hefty, so make sure you enlist some help before trying to lift them. 

Image by Christian Brothers

Making space-saving changes to your laundry room is easy, but what’s easier is booking a Laundryheap dry cleaning service. To book your service, simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app.


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Things to consider when using a laundromat

Photo by Ekaterina Belinskaya from Pexels

If you don’t have access to a washing machine at home, you can always use a laundromat. Before using a laundromat for the first time, consider these things. 

  • Is the laundromat local?
  • Have you separated your clothing?
  • Do you know how to pay?
  • Have you got detergent and fabric softener?
  • Does your laundromat provide washing and drying services?
  • How will you fill your time between washing your clothes?
  • Is there another way to wash your clothes? 

Is the laundromat local?

The first thing to consider before using a laundromat is how local it is. If you have a lot of washing to do, and your only options are to walk or get public transport, the closer the laundromat is the better. 

Photo by Ingo Joseph from Pexels

Have you separated your clothing?

Sometimes laundromats can become very busy and it can be difficult to find a machine to use. Before you leave for the laundromat, separate your clothing into whites and colours. This means you can put your clothing immediately into the machine and speed up the laundry process. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Do you know how to pay?

Not all laundromats have the same payment system. Some laundromats only accept cash, whereas others will accept cash and card payments. You can check online to see what your laundromats preferred payment method is, or make sure that you have both payment options with you. 

Have you got detergent and fabric softener?

Some laundromats will have vending machines where you can buy small bottles of laundry detergent and fabric softener. That being said, it is much more cost-efficient to use your own detergent and fabric softener. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Does your laundromat provide washing and drying services?

The majority of laundromats will provide both washing machines and tumble dryers, however, it is always best to double-check just in case. 

Photo by Daria Sannikova from Pexels

How will you fill your time between washing your clothes?

Depending on how many loads of washing you need to do, and whether you are both washing and drying your clothes, there can be a long stretch of time between the beginning and end of your wash. How are you going to fill this time? You can choose to leave the laundromat whilst your washing is on, however, if you want to stay, you could do some work, read a book, or talk to a friend.

Photo by Kaboompics .com from Pexels

Is there another way to wash your clothes?

If you don’t have a washing machine, a laundromat is not your only option for washing your clothes. At Laundryheap, we will pick up your clothing directly from your house, launder it, and re-deliver your clothing straight to your door. We work around your schedule, and can even complete your laundry service in as little as 24 hours. You can see whether Laundryheap operates in your area by using our postcode checker. 

To book your Laundryheap service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to remove hair dye stains

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Hair dye can be incredibly difficult to remove from clothing. If you have accidentally dripped some on yourself, this is how you can remove it. 

  • Before treating your stain
  • Black, brown, or blue hair dye 
  • Red hair dye

Before treating your stain

Before you begin treating your stain, check your item’s care label. If it says ‘dry-clean only’ do not treat the stain yourself. Instead, book your Laundryheap dry cleaning service and let us handle it. If your care label doesn’t say ‘dry-clean only’ you are safe to proceed. 

Black, brown, or blue hair dye

To treat your hair dye stain you will need…

  • A soft-bristled brush
  • Water
  • A basin 
  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent 
  • Oxygen-based bleach
  • Chlorine bleach (for white clothing)

Begin treating your stain by holding your garment under a cold water tap. This will help remove any hair dye lingering on the surface of your item. Make sure that you use cold water only as hot water will only aid the stain in setting further into your clothing

Next, pour a capful of heavy-duty laundry detergent over the stain and use a soft-bristled brush to gently rub it in. It’s best to use a laundry detergent with stain-lifting enzymes, so double check you are using the right detergent prior to pouring. Continue rubbing your stain for 5-15 minutes, or until you begin to see the hair dye become lighter in colour.

Once you are satisfied that your stain is a lighter colour, fill a basin with cold water and add oxygen-based bleach per the instructions on the packaging. Submerge your garment in the water and bleach mixture, making sure that the hair dye stain is completely in the water, and leave it to soak for at least 8 hours. 

After 8 hours, lift your item out of the water. If your stain has been removed, you can wash your item as you normally would. Should the stain remain, mix a fresh basin of cool water and oxygen-based bleach and leave your garment for another 8 hours. 

If your hair dye stain is on a white item of clothing and mix a solution of 1 gallon of water and 1-fourth a cup of chlorine bleach. Submerge your stained garment in this mixture, and leave it to soak for 15 minutes. Do not leave your item in the solution for any longer than 15 minutes as the chlorine bleach will begin to weaken the fabric. 

After 15 minutes, remove your item from the solution.

Removing red hair dye 

Red hair dye has a different composition than black, brown, or blue hair dye, and so the stain needs to be treated in a different way. 

To treat your hair dye stain you will need…

  • 2 soaking containers
  • Dishwashing liquid 
  • Ammonia
  • Distilled white vinegar 
  • Oxygen-based bleach 
  • Water 

As with removing black, brown, or blue hair dye, begin treatment by running your stained item under a cool water tap to remove any surface hair dye. 

Next, mix a solution of 1 quarter of water, one-half teaspoon of dishwashing liquid, and one tablespoon of ammonia, in a container. Submerge your stained garment in this solution and leave it to soak for 15 minutes. 

After 15 minutes, remove your garment from the solution and, using your fingers, rub the stained area. This will help loosen the hair dye and allow it to be removed from the fabric with greater ease. Once you have rubbed your stain for around 5-10 minutes, submerge it in the previously used solution for a further 15 minutes. 

Whilst your item is soaking, use a separate container to mix 1 quarter warm water with 1 quarter distilled white vinegar. Once your item has completed it’s 15-minute soak, rinse it well, and submerge it in your new solution. Leave your item to soak for 30 minutes. 

After 30 minutes, remove your garment from the solution. If your stain has been removed, wash your item as you usually would.

Should your stain remain, fill your sink with cold water and add oxygen-based bleach per the packet’s instructions. Submerge your stained item in the solution, and leave it to soak for 8 hours. If, after 8 hours, the stain has not been removed, repeat the process with fresh water and fresh oxygen-based bleach. 

The most effective way to remove any stain is to get it treated by a professional. When you book your Laundryheap service, let us know what item(s) of clothing is stained and where the stain(s) is located. To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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The 5 stains of Christmas

Christmas is a time for giving, sharing, and being with those you love. Unfortunately, this can lead to stained clothing. Don’t worry though, because this is your guide to removing Christmas stains. 

  • Mulled wine 
  • Milk
  • Cranberry sauce
  • Chocolate
  • Candy canes

Mulled wine 

Mulled wine is the perfect way to get into the Christmas spirit, so don’t let a mulled wine stain stop you from having a holly jolly Christmas. As soon as you spot the stain, dampen the area with a small amount of water. Using paper towels, or a clean, dry, cloth, gently dab at the stain, making sure to not rub it. Once the stain begins to lighten and lift, put your item into the washing machine and wash as per the care label instructions. 

Milk 

Don’t despair if you spill milk down yourself whilst leaving it out for Santa. Begin by blotting the stain with a clean cloth or napkin. Next, mix two cups of cold water with one tablespoon of dishwashing liquid and one tablespoon of baking soda. Rub this mixture into the milk stain using your fingers or a soft brush. Once your stain has been covered by the mixture, rinse it with cold water. If you can still see the milk stain, repeat the process again. 

Cranberry sauce 

You can’t have a Christmas dinner without turkey, accompanied by lashings of cranberry sauce. Unfortunately, it is very easy to get over excited, and end up with a large cranberry sauce stain right down the middle of your Christmas outfit. If this does happen, act quickly as it is easier to get a wet stain out than a dry one.

Start by scrapping away the excess cranberry sauce with the back of a spoon or a dry, clean, cloth. Try and avoid spreading the stain. Once all of the excess cranberry sauce has been removed, flush the stain with a constant stream of cold water, making sure that the back of the stain is facing the flow of water. You should begin to notice your stain becoming lighter in colour. Next, rub a small amount of laundry detergent directly onto the stain, and wash your garment as normal. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Chocolate 

If you can’t indulge yourself at Christmas, then when can you? If you accidentally smear chocolate on your outfit, simply begin removing the stain by using a knife or spoon to lift the excess chocolate. Next, turn your garment inside out and run a constant stream of cold water through the stain. This will help loosen the stain from the fibres of your clothing. Once you’ve loosened your stain, lather it with laundry detergent, and leave it to soak for 30 minutes in cold water. Finally, wash your item as per the instructions on its care label. 

Candy canes

On Christmas Day, you can finally eat those candy canes that have been tempting you from the Christmas tree all month. Candy canes are not necessarily the easiest candy to eat, and when you bite into one, it is easy for them to shatter into small shards. If these shads end up stuck on your clothing, begin by filling a zip lock bag with ice and applying it directly onto the stain. This will cause the shard to stiffen and become easier to remove. When it has become hard, simply pull the shard away from your clothing, being careful not to rip your item.

To treat the stain left behind, dip a clean, dry, cloth in white vinegar and blot the stain. Once it has become damp with white vinegar, leave it to sit for 15 minutes before rinsing it with water and blotting it dry. 

Photo by Pavel Danilyuk from Pexels

Don’t let stains ruin your Christmas. If there are any stains on your clothing that you can’t remove, give them to us. We will pick-up, dry clean, and re-deliver your clothing back to you, stain free, within 24 hours. 

To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 

Merry Christmas, from the Laundryheap family. 


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How to remove makeup stains

Makeup is very easy to get on clothes, especially around the collar of t-shirts. This is how you can remove those makeup stains.

  • Make-up wipes
  • Rubbing alcohol 
  • Hairspray 
  • Shaving cream 
  • Hairdryer
  • Ice 
  • Soap and water
  • Detergent 
  • Laundryheap

Makeup wipes 

Makeup wipes can remove the makeup from your clothes just as well as the makeup on your face. If you have spilt a makeup product on yourself, simply take a makeup wipe and dab, or gently rub, the stain. You can see makeup artists using this technique backstage at the hottest fashion shows. 

It’s best to remember that makeup wipes will only work on fresh stains that have not set into the fibres of your clothing. Also, it’s best to not use a makeup wipe on satin or silk clothing as it could leave behind a water mark.

Rubbing alcohol 

Have you accidentally smeared lipstick on the sleeve of your favourite shirt? Soak a cotton ball in rubbing alcohol and dab it over the stain. The alcohol will break down the oils in the lipstick and lift the stain in minutes.

Hairspray 

If rubbing alcohol doesn’t get your lipstick stain out, try using hairspray. Spray a good amount of hairspray directly on the stain, and leave it to dry completely. Once the hairspray is completely dry, rub the stain with a makeup wipe. The stain should easily lift and leave your clothing makeup free. Be aware that this trick will only work with hairspray that contains alcohol. 

Shaving cream  

This may sound strange, but shaving cream is actually great for lifting makeup stains. Simply apply a squirt, or two depending on the size of your stain, directly onto the mark and let it sit for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, the cream should have dissolved the stain. Wash off the shaving cream with cold water, and wash your clothing as you usually would. 

Image by Vasilijus Bortnikas from Pixabay

Hairdryer

This is less a tip for treating a stain and more a tip for how to avoid one. If you have spilt loose powder on your clothing, it can be incredibly tempting to simply sweep it off with your hand. Avoid doing this at all cost. This will only result in powder being smeared into the fibres of your clothing. Instead, use a hairdryer to blow away the powder, and leave your clothing stain free. 

Ice

It’s always best to use ice or cold water when pre-treating a stain. Using hot water can cause a stain to spread and set further into the fibres of your clothing. To lift a makeup stain, rub a cube of ice vigorously over the stained area, and watch as it lifts before your eyes. 

Soap and water 

Soap and water is a classic stain lifting combination. Begin by dabbing cold water over your stain and adding a very small amount of soap. Next, rub the fabric of your clothing together and allow the friction from the material to lift the stain. Avoid using a paper towel or napkin for this method as this will only result in flakes of the paper sticking to your clothing and making the stained area look worse. 

Image by Pezibear from Pixabay

Detergent

If you are prone to accidentally getting makeup on your clothing whilst you are on the move, invest in a detergent pen or detergent wipes. Simply press the tip of your pen, or dab a wipe, over the stain and it will be lifted. Before using a detergent pen it is best to remove any excess powder or liquid from the stain with a clean wipe. 

Laundryheap 

Laundryheap is always here to help with any stains that you have. Simply let us know what item is stained, where the stain is, and what the stain is, and we will do the rest. 

To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.  


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How to remove henna stains

If you’ve been left with a henna stain on your favourite outfit, this is how you remove it. 

  • What is henna?
  • Removing henna stains 
  • Laundryheap

What is henna?

Henna is a form of body art that originates from Ancient India. Decorative designs are painted onto the body using a plant-based dye, and it usually lasts for 2 weeks. In India, henna is associated with positive spirits and good luck. The night before an Indian wedding, the bride will take part in a Mehndi ceremony, where she will have her henna painted as a way to wish her good health and prosperity during her marriage. 

Removing henna stains 

If you get a henna stain on your clothing you must treat it as quickly as possible. It’s best to treat your stain immediately to prevent it from drying into the fabric of your clothing.

To remove a henna stain from your clothing you will need:

  • A cloth or paper towel
  • Laundry detergent 
  • A clean toothbrush
  • Cold water
  • Distilled white vinegar OR rubbing alcohol

To begin removing your henna stain, use a clean, absorbent, cloth, or paper towel, and blot the stained area. It is important that you do not rub the stain as this will only make it bigger. Instead, press your cloth, or paper towel, on top of the stain and allow your cloth to absorb the excess dye. Each time you blot the stain use a fresh section of the cloth to prevent the stain from spreading. 

After you have removed as much of the excess dye as possible, put a few drops of laundry detergent onto the stain, and use a clean toothbrush to scrub the detergent into the fabric. Continue scrubbing until you can no longer see the stain. Although it is important to be vigorous with your scrubbing in order to lift the stain, do be careful to not be overly harsh as this can result in your fabric becoming damaged. 

Once you can no longer see the stain, use cold water to rinse away the remaining detergent and dye. It is important that you use cold water rather than hot because hot water could set the stain. Keep rinsing your fabric until all of the detergent and dye has been removed. 

If you can still see your henna stain after rinsing the fabric, pour a small amount of distilled white vinegar or rubbing alcohol onto it. Let the fabric soak up the solution for an hour, before washing your item as you normally would. 

Should your clothing still be stained, repeat the process again. 

Laundryheap  

If you have a henna stain on your clothing, and are concerned about treating it yourself, send it to Laundryheap. We provide an abundance of services, from general washing to dry-cleaning, to fit all of your laundry needs. If your clothing is stained, simply write us a note in the order instructions explaining what item the stain is on, where, and what the stain is, and we will take every precaution possible to remove the stain for you. 

We are currently operating, contaclessly, in London, Manchester, Birmingham, Coventry, Dubai, Sharjah, Abu Dhab, Amsterdam, Haarlem, Rotterdam, The Hague, Copenhagen, Dublin, Doha, New York, Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Jose, Washington DC, Chicago, Kuwait City, Manama, and Singapore

To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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Top tips for doing laundry while in Southeast Asia

If you are travelling around Southeast Asia for an extended period of time, you will need to do laundry. Here are some top tips on how to do so.

  • Pack smartly
  • Travel with mini laundry detergents
  • Don’t forget a laundry bag 
  • Never use hotels
  • Bring a makeshift clothesline 
  • Dry your clothes inside
  • Carry plenty of coins 
  • Plan your laundry time
  • The bag method 
  • Laundryheap

Pack smartly

The most important thing to remember is to pack light and pack materials that are easy to wash. There are several ways to do laundry in Southeast Asia, from using a launderettes to washing your clothes in the sink, regardless of the method you decide to use you don’t want to spend an extended period of time, or money, doing it. In addition, it’s best to pack clothes that are durable and easy to wash, such as cotton

Image by Stefan Coders from Pixabay

Travel with mini laundry detergents 

There are several launderettes across Southeast Asia that you can use. To make your laundry experience quick and easy, travel with mini laundry detergents. They are pre-measured for one or two washes, and will prevent you from having to carry, or buy, a full-sized detergent that you will not use. 

Don’t forget a laundry bag

Laundry bags are handy to take wherever you travel to. As soon as an item of your clothing is dirty, simply put it in your laundry bag so that you can differentiate between your clean and dirty clothes. As soon as your laundry bag is full, or you are running low on clean clothes, you can decide how best to clean them. In addition, if your clothing is still wet or damp, but you need to pack them away, putting your clothes in your laundry bag will prevent the smell of damp clothing spreading to your other packed belongings. 

Never use hotels 

If you are staying in a hotel whilst travelling around Southeast Asia there will more than likely be a laundry service provided. Do not use it. Hotel laundry services will usually charge per item of clothing that needs to be laundered rather than by weight. This can result in an extortionate laundry bill by the time you have washed all of your clothes. It may be convenient to use the hotels services, but, if you are looking to save some money, its best to look around for local launderettes or alternative ways to wash your clothes. 

Image by John

Bring a makeshift clothes line 

Unless you know that there are tumble dryers available where you are planning to wash your clothes, it’s always best to pack a makeshift clothes line. Your clothesline can be something as simple as some strong rope, as long as you have something that you can hang your clothes on to dry. Some laundrettes will have clothes lines available for you to use, however, this is not a guarantee so it’s always better to bring your own.

Dry your clothes inside 

Southeast Asia is known for its warm and sunny climate, however, it is also extremely humid. If you are planning on hanging your clothes out to dry, it’s best to do so indoors rather than outside. The humidity from the air will slow down the drying process, making it more time efficient to simply hang your clothing in your hostel/hotel room. 

Carry plenty of coins 

There is no shortage of coin-operated laundrettes in Southeast Asia, but you have to make sure that you have the coins to use them. There is nothing worse than turning up to a laundrettes, filling a machine with your washing, only to find out that you don’t have enough coins to operate the machine. To save yourself the hassle, make sure that you have plenty of coins with you to get your washing done. 

Plan your laundry time 

If you are going to do laundry whilst in Southeast Asia it’s best to plan your time effectively. There are a lot of things you need to consider, such as drying times, pick-up times, and when laundrettes are opened. Plan your method of laundry prior to going on your travels and it will help you manage your laundry time much more efficiently.

The bag method 

This is a slightly unusual method for doing laundry, but is a handy alternative if you do not have access to a laundrette. 

For the bag method you will need a vinyl bag, water, and laundry detergent. 

Begin by filling your vinyl bag until it is half filled and put your clothes in it. Next, add in your detergent and let your clothes soak for a few minutes. After a few minute, use a plunging motion to rotate your clothing. Once you are satisfied with the cleanliness of your clothing, take each item out and rinse off the detergent with water. 

Laundryheap 

If you don’t want to take care of your clothing yourself whilst travelling in Southeast Asia, use Laundryheap. We will pick up, dry clean, and re-deliver your laundry to you, completely contactless, and on you schedule. 

To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to remove toothpaste stains

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

It’s easy to accidentally drip toothpaste onto your new suit or comfiest PJ’s. This is how you get that pesky stain out. 

  • White toothpaste
  • Whitening toothpaste 
  • Gel toothpaste

White toothpaste 

White toothpaste contains titanium dioxide, which is the chemical that makes it look white. If you use white toothpaste, water will not be enough to lift the stain it leaves behind.

What you’ll need

  • A blunt object, such as a spoon 
  • A clean cloth
  • Liquid laundry detergent

Begin by using your blunt object to remove excess toothpaste from your clothing. Try and use an upwards motion when doing this to avoid spreading the loose particles to other parts of your clothing. 

Once you have sufficiently removed the top layer of the stain, slightly dampen a clean cloth and blot the area. This will help loosen the stain and aid in it being lifted from your clothing. 

Next, work a small amount of liquid laundry detergent onto your toothpaste stain. Make sure that the detergent is spread over the entirety of the stain so that the whole area can be lifted. 

After you have adequately rubbed in your detergent, wash your stained item of clothing in your washing machine as usual. 

If your toothpaste stain has not been completely removed after washing, repeat the full process again. 

Image by wei zhu from Pixabay

Whitening toothpaste 

Whitening toothpaste usually contains a mild bleaching agent that works to whiten your teeth. This bleaching agent can cause discoloration on coloured and dark clothing if it is left for an extended period of time. To remove a whitening toothpaste stain you need to follow the exact process of removing a white toothpaste stain, however, you need to act as soon as you notice the stain to avoid excessive discolouration to your clothing. 

Image by Marco Verch Professional P

Gel toothpaste 

Gel toothpaste contains dye to make it a blue/green colour. This dye can discolour your white clothing if left for too long. As soon as you notice a gel toothpaste stain you need to follow the same procedure as removing a regular toothpaste stain. Once you have washed your stained item of clothing, dry your garment in direct sunlight. Sunlight has natural bleaching qualities and can help even out any discolouration. 

If you have a toothpaste stain, or any stain, that you can not get rid of, let us help you. If you tell us what items of clothing are stained we will take extra precautions to help lift the stain and deliver your clothes back to you stain-free. To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Tumble dryer care guide

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Tumble dryers are incredibly useful when you need to quickly dry your clothes. If not looked after properly, you will find that your tumble dryer may lose its ability to dry your clothes, or may even stop working completely. This care guide will help you look after your tumble dryer.

  • Clean the lint filter 
  • Empty the water tank
  • Clear the vents 
  • Clean the dryer drum 
  • Un-clog the heat exchanger

Clean the lint filter

As your clothes are spun in your tumble dryer, they release particles of fibres and fluff. The lint filter in your tumble dryer prevents these particles from clogging the airflow of the vent system. It is important to clean your tumble dryers lint filter after every use. If you don’t you can restrict the flow of air through the dryer and prevent your clothes from being sufficiently dried.

To clean your lint filter remove it from the tumble dryer and use a vacuum hose to remove the loose particles. You can find your lint filter at the front of your tumble dryer, just under the rim of your dryer’s door. To remove the rest of the particles, wash your lint filter in warm soapy water. 

You need to leave your lint filter to completely dry before putting it back in the tumble dryer. Whilst you are waiting for your filter to dry, use your vacuum hose to clear out the slot your lint filter sits in. This will help increase the airflow of your tumble dryer. 

Once your lint filter is completely dry, slot it back into the dryer, and it will be ready to use.

Empty the water tank

A tumble dryer works by rotating your wet clothes and adding heat to them to remove the water. The water that is removed from your clothing is stored in the tumble dryers water tank. Depending on the model of your machine, the water tank will be stored at the top of your machine in a drawer or at the bottom. Despite the fact that your water tank can hold the excess water from 2 loads of laundry, it’s best to empty it after every use. To drain your water, simply remove the water tank, and pour the water down the sink. You may want to give your tank a quick rinse before re-inserting it into your machine. 

Image by Peter Novotny from Pixabay

Clear the vents 

If you own a vented tumble dryer you must check the hose and vent of your machine. 

The hose of your tumble dryer takes the warm, damp, air away from the drum, and helps circulate fresh air into your machine. You should give your hose enough space to lay straight, without any kinks. If your hose has a kink it can restrict airflow and increase the time it takes for your clothes to dry. 

After checking the hose, check that your wall vent is clear of fluff and dust. If your vent is clogged it will restrict airflow and increase the amount of time it takes for your clothes to dry. To clear your vent you can use a vacuum hose to remove any loose fluff and dust. Once you have removed the loose debris, use a wet cloth to get rid of any remaining dust. This will leave your machine working at its maximum potential. 

Clean the dryer drum 

It is vital to clean the drum of your tumble dryer for two reasons. Firstly, grime and dust from your washing can linger in the drum and transfer onto other loads of laundry. Secondly, the drying sensor that monitors when your clothes are dry is located in the drum, but, if dirty, can lead to inaccurate drying times. 

To clean the drum of your tumble dryer, use a clean cloth and white vinegar to rub the drum of your dryer. Ideally, this should be done after every load, or at least after every two loads. 

Unclog the heat exchanger 

The heat exchanger in your tumble dryer turns steam from the drum back into water. Amongst the steam and air that passes through the exchanger are fibres from your clothing. Overtime these fibres build-up, which can result in a clogged heat exchanger. When your exchanger becomes clogged, it slows the flow of air through your machine, and prevents your clothes from drying. 

To unclog your heat exchanger, use your hand to remove the larger lumps of fluff. Once you’ve removed the larger sections of fluff, rinse the rest of the exchanger under the tap. Leave it to completely dry before placing back into the machine. 

Whilst your cleaning your tumble dryer, let us dry your clothes for you. You can book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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How to wash reusable nappies

Image by PublicDomainPictures from Pixabay

Reusable nappies are a great alternative to their single-use counterpart. Firstly, because they can be used multiple times, they reduce the amount of single-use plastic being used. In addition, because you don’t have to constantly re-buy nappies, you can save yourself a significant amount of money.

Here is how you keep re-usable nappies clean and ready for multiple uses. 

  • What are reusable nappies?
  • Are they as effective as single-use nappies? 
  • How to wash reusable cloth nappies

What are reusable nappies? 

Reusable nappies are nappies that can be used multiple times. They are often made from cotton, and are made up of an absorbent inner layer that contains a washable or disposable liner, and a waterproof outer layer. You can buy them in a range of sizes to fit all babies, and with a range of fastenings so you can decide which is easiest for you. In addition to the environmental and cost effective benefits of using reusable nappies, they are also chemical-free. 

Are they as effective as single-use nappies?

Reusable nappies are just as effective as single-use nappies. Before you use one it is advised to wash it so that the material becomes as absorbent as possible. Once you have done this you should not experience any difficulties with absorbency. 

If you are experiencing leaking it could be due to a detergent build-up, a poor fit, or a damaged PUL, which can happen if the nappy is dried at too high a heat. 

Image by Mahesh Patel from Pixabay

How to wash reusable nappies 

Begin by lifting the nappy liner out of the nappy. If you are using reusable nappy liners, shake any loose waste into the toilet. If you are using a disposable liner, dispose of it in the appropriate bin. 

Once the liner has been taken care of, place your nappy in a nappy bin, or any container with a tight-fitting lid. It’s always best to place a mesh laundry bag inside your container so that when it is full you don’t have to handle the individual nappies. 

When you have enough reusable nappies for a wash load, place them into your washing machine with a cap of non-bio powder. Avoid using liquid detergent and fabric softener as they can affect the absorbency of the material. Set your washing machine to 60 degrees to ensure that all the bacteria from the nappies is disposed of. Some antibacterial washing powders can clean in temperatures as low as 30 degrees, however, unless stated on the box, it’s best to wash your nappies at 60 degrees. 

Once your machine has finished, you can dry your nappies. It’s best to dry them in direct sunlight, however, if this is not achievable, you can tumble dry them on a low heat setting, or leave them on a drying rack

Reusable nappies need to be washed frequently, but, if you adequately care for them, they can last a lifetime. 

Image by Hannah Spray

Whilst you look after the reusable nappies, we’ll look after you. Book your Laundryheap service by visiting the Laundryheap website, or by downloading the free Laundryheap app.