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Travel hacks for families 

Photo by Victoria Borodinova from Pexels

Family holidays create memories that will last a lifetime. They can be incredible for family bonding and enjoying time together away from the home. That being said, they can also be incredibly stressful, so here are some hacks to take some of that stress away. 

  • Try to find family-friendly accommodation
  • Use a backpack
  • Pack spare clothes
  • Use vacuum seal bags
  • Comfort is key
  • Think about entertainment
  • Don’t forget plane sweets
  • Share the responsibility 
  • Bring some home comforts
  • Don’t forget to enjoy yourself!

Try to find family-friendly accommodation

Before you begin to contemplate travelling, think about your accommodation. Although staying in a generic hotel or renting short-stay accommodation may be cheaper, consider finding family-friendly specific accommodation. Family-friendly accommodation is built with children in mind, so there are usually additional activities available to keep your children entertained. It may be slightly pricier, but it could make your family holiday more enjoyable for everyone involved. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Use a backpack

Between checking in to your flight, getting through security, and making sure that your children are safe and happy, it will be rare to find your hands empty whilst you are at the airport, and on your holiday. Using a backpack for your carry-on rather than a travel bag will guarantee that your hands are accessible when you need them, and will guarantee that you don’t misplace or lose sight of your carry-on. 

Photo by Tatiana Syrikova from Pexels

Pack spare clothes

In your carry-on make sure that you pack a spare change of clothes for all the family. If you have young children you may already have packed a spare change of clothes for them, but make sure that you also pack spare clothes for yourself. Children can become travel sick, or could spill juice and/or food down themselves and you, so it’s always best to be prepared. Even if you just pack a change of top, it will at least help towards making everyone feel fresh once you have arrived at your holiday destination. 

Photo by William Fortunato from Pexels

Use vacuum seal bags 

There is a lot of packing involved for a family holiday. To save yourself some space in your suitcase, use vacuum seal bags. Assign each person in the family one or two bags to put all of their belonging in. Once each bag is packed, seal them shut and put them in the suitcase. Not only will this save you space, but it will also make packing, and unpacking, much easier. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Comfort is key

When deciding what to wear for traveling remember that comfort is key. All members of your family should prioritise comfort over style, so think about wearing loose-fitting clothing made from lightweight materials. These types of clothes will be easy to move in, and perfect for if you are traveling to or from a hot country. Consider packing a couple of small blankets or thick long scarves in your carry-on just in case you or the members of your family get cold whilst traveling. It’s always good to be prepared for all weather whilst on the move. 

Think about entertainment  

Children can become irritable whilst traveling, especially on particularly long journeys, so make sure that you have an ample amount of things that will entertain them. It could be their favourite toy, a tablet to watch TV and films on, or a game that can be played. Alternatively, you could entertain your children by getting them excited about the holiday.

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Don’t forget plane sweets

One of the most unpleasant things about traveling is when the airplane is taking off and landing and your ears pop. This can be disorientating for both children and adults alike, so be prepared with plane sweets. Anything that can be sucked on will help to un-pop your ears on a plane, so choose some age-appropriate sweets and have them on-hand for your flight. 

Image by William Warby

Share the responsibility 

The responsibility of traveling as a family should not land on one person. If you are traveling with another adult or with older children share the responsibility. Make a list of responsibilities before you leave and divide them between the other adult(s) and older children in your family. You could even share some of the smaller responsibilities with the younger children, such as deciding on travel entertainment or what snacks to take with you. Traveling as a family can be stressful, so sharing the responsibility will help ease that stress and ensure that everyone has a good time. 

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Bring some home comforts 

We all get homesick at times, and, for younger children especially, it can be scary and disorientating staying in a new location. To make the transition from home to holiday easier for them, pack some home comforts. This could be their nightlight, pillows, or favourite teddy. You don’t have to pack anything too big or difficult to travel with, just something small that will make them feel safe and at home

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Don’t forget to enjoy yourself 

A family holiday is for the whole family, not just the children, so don’t forget to enjoy yourself. Whilst you are away take some time out of your day to do something that you want to do. Maybe it’s reading a book on the beach, going for a swim, or taking a walk on your own. A family holiday is just as much about enjoying yourself and getting away from the stresses of everyday life, as it is enjoying time as a family. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Enjoy your family holiday without the stress of laundry. Book your Laundryheap service today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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How to make natural dyes 

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If you are interested in dying your clothes it’s best to use natural dyes. Unlike their synthetic alternatives, natural dyes do not contain harmful chemicals and usually have antimicrobial properties. This makes them a lot safer to use when dying clothing, especially for children

  • Prep
  • General method 
  • Colours 

Prep

Making natural dyes is a messy process so it’s best to do some prep before you begin. Firstly, make sure that you protect your skin and clothing by wearing an apron and gloves. As the name suggests, natural dyes will dye any clothing or skin that they come in contact with so you must protect yourself from any potential spills. To protect your surfaces from the dye, lay down plenty of newspapers or a tablecloth. Once you have successfully protected yourself and the surrounding area, you are ready to begin making your dye.

Photo by Thirdman from Pexels

General method

To make your dye, per colour, you will need…

  • 700ml of water
  • Your chosen item to create the dye from
  • Saucepan
  • Sieve
  • A bowl for each dye

To begin making your natural dye pour 700ml of water into a saucepan with the item you are going to create your dye from. Cover your pan with a lid and bring to a boil.

When your water has reached boiling point, turn off the heat and leave your pan for 10 minutes. 

After 10 minutes, strain your water into a clean bowl using a sieve. In your bowl will be your dye, ready to use on any white item of your choice. 

To use the dye, simply add your white item and leave it for as long as you want. The longer you leave your item in the dye the darker it will be. Once you are satisfied with the colour, use a pair of tongs to remove the freshly dyed item from the bowl, and gently run it under cool water to remove the excess dye. Once you are satisfied that the excess dye has been removed, transfer your item to a clean surface and leave it to dry completely. 

Photo by Teona Swift from Pexels

Colours

Purple: To make purple use half a red cabbage

Blue: To make blue use half a red cabbage to make the initial dye, and add half a teaspoon of baking powder. 

Pink: To make pink use half a red cabbage to make the initial dye, and add the juice of half a lemon.

Red: To make red use one cooked beetroot. If you would like a stronger red, use two cooked beetroots.  

Yellow: To make yellow use a thumb-sized piece of turmeric. You can use half a teaspoon of ground turmeric, however, fresh turmeric will create a more vibrant shade of yellow.

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon from Pexels

Making dye and using it to re-invent your clothing is a much more fun way to spend your time than doing laundry. Book your Laundryheap order today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to care for your dog’s clothing 

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We love our dogs. They really are our best friends. That is why it is important to stay on top of cleaning and caring for their clothing. To keep them safe and looking fabulous. 

  • How often?
  • Check the care label
  • Make repairs
  • Pre-treat stains
  • Seal the garment
  • Use the right detergent
  • Dry 
  • Clean your machine

How often?

Just like humans, dog’s clothing must be washed regularly to remove bacteria and keep them looking and smelling fresh. You will find that the frequency that you wash your dog’s items will vary depending on the season. For example, you may not dress your pup as often during the spring and summer seasons so their outfits will only need to be washed once a month. In the autumn and winter months, however, you might be dressing your dog every day and therefore washing their clothing biweekly, if not weekly. 

Photo by Erik Mclean from Pexels

Check the care label

Washing your dog’s clothing is not dissimilar to washing your own. Firstly, it’s important to always read the care label. Just like with human clothing, some dog clothing will be hand wash only depending on the material it is made from. You may also find that some items can only withstand a certain heat setting on your washing machine

Photo by Sam Lion from Pexels

Make repairs 

Before washing yours dog’s garment, check for any rips or loose threads that may become worse whilst washing. Dog clothing can be incredibly expensive so it’s best to make any mends whilst they are small and manageable. 

Photo by Skylar Kang from Pexels

Pre-treat stains 

Just like with your own clothing it’s important that any stains on your pooch’s clothes are lifted prior to washing. It’s easy for your dogs items to become stained, especially when you take them for park walks, so give each item a thorough check before putting them in the machine.

To pre-treat stains, rub a small amount of heavy duty laundry detergent directly into the stain using either your fingers or a soft bristled brush. Make sure that the detergent is thoroughly worked in before putting it in your washing machine or moving on to handwashing. 

Photo by Eun Suk from Pexels

Seal the garment

If you are machine washing your dogs clothing, make sure that all buttons, zippers, and poppers are closed. This will help prevent any snagging and loose threads becoming unravelled. You may also want to put the clothing in a mesh laundry bag to prevent any small accessories becoming detached and lost, and to manage the amount of hair that makes its way into your machine. 

Photo by Gilberto Reyes from Pexels

Use the right detergent 

Your dogs skin is incredibly sensitive so you must make sure that you are using the right detergent. It’s best to use a hypoallergenic detergent that does not contain perfumes and dyes- the best option is to find a detergent for babies or sensitive skin. Alternatively, you can buy pet specific detergent. 

If you notice that your pooch’s garments don’t smell particularly fresh once you have washes them, use baking soda to lift the smell. Mix a solution of two quarters of water and one cup of baking soda and leave your item to soak overnight. The next day, re-wash the clothing and you should notice the smell disappear. 

Photo by mark glancy from Pexels

Dry

Once you have washed your dog’s clothing, you must make sure that it is properly dry before re-dressing your pup. The best way to dry your dog’s clothing is to leave each item to air dry. This will ensure that each garment does not shrink and become tighter on your hairy friend, which is a possibility if you were to use a tumble dryer

Photo by Skyler Ewing from Pexels

Clean your machine

If you are using a washing machine to wash your dog’s clothing make sure that you clean it once you are done. Your pups clothing will more than likely be hairy when it first enters the machine, and that hair will now be distributed in your washing machine. Take an hour out of your day to thoroughly clean your machine, ready for your next load of laundry

Photo by Erik Mclean from Pexels

Whilst you are taking care of your dog’s clothing, let us take care of yours. Book your Laundryheap service today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Reduce, reuse, recycle whilst doing laundry 

Photo by Sarah Chai from Pexels

One of the most effective ways to lower our carbon footprint is to reduce, reuse, and recycle the items we use. That includes when we do our laundry

  • Reduce the amount of laundry you do
  • Reduce the temperature you wash at 
  • Reuse detergent bottles 
  • Reuse dryer balls and sheets
  • Recycle containers 
  • Recycle your clothing
  • How Laundryheap is doing their bit 

Reduce the amount of laundry you do

On average a washing machine uses 350 to 500 watts of electricity per hour. The average person does two loads of laundry per week, which translates to 36,400 to 52,000 watts of electricity in just one year. By reducing the amount of laundry you do you could half your yearly electricity usage. There are several ways to reduce your laundry load, including waiting until you have a full laundry basket, spot treating stains, and freezing your jeans.

Photo by Sarah Chai from Pexels

Reduce the temperature you wash at

Washing your laundry at 60 degrees will kill bacteria, but use 40% more energy than washing at 30 degrees. You may have noticed when shopping for laundry detergent that many brands now make cold wash detergents. These are detergents that work just as effectively at 30 degrees as they do at hotter temperatures, meaning that you can reduce the temperature you wash at without affecting the cleanliness of your laundry. Be aware that if you are laundering items that are stained it is best to pre-treat them before washing at 30 degrees. 

Photo by Amina Filkins from Pexels

Reuse detergent bottles

Once you have used your laundry detergent, don’t throw your bottles away, reuse them. There are a multitude of ways that you can reuse detergent bottles, including making a watering can, a bird feeder, or weights. You can even use your empty detergent bottle to store homemade laundry detergent. Just remember that before you reuse your detergent bottles you need to make sure that they are fully rinsed out. 

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Reuse dryer balls and sheets

Dryer balls and sheets are used to reduce the drying time of your laundry, meaning that you use less energy per load. Rather than using one-use dryer balls and sheets, invest in reusable options. They may be slightly more expensive, but will save you money in the long run. To be even more environmentally conscious you can make your own dryer balls using tin foil or old clothing. 

Image by mjtmail (tiggy)

Recycle containers

If you don’t want to reuse your detergent bottles, make sure that you recycle them as well as your other laundry containers. Most laundry containers are made from cardboard or plastic, both of which can be recycled. Make sure that you adequately rinse and/or empty your containers before recycling them, ensuring that there is no residue left in the bottom. 

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Recycle your clothing 

It’s not just laundry containers that can be recycled, you can also recycle your clothing. If you notice that you have clothing that you don’t wear often, donate them to a local charity. This will ensure that your clothing gets rehomed rather than being added to the 92 million tons of textile waste created each year. Alternatively, if your clothing is becoming worn or ripped, you could create something new from your scraps. Whether you are an avid sewer and can create a new garment, or you simply use your ripped clothing as a cleaning rag, you can give even the most worn down piece of clothing a new life. 

Photo by Julia M Cameron from Pexels

How Laundryheap is doing their bit

At Laundryheap we are dedicated to improving the way we work to be more environmentally friendly. For example, we offer our customers the option of an eco friendly route. This means that our drivers are given a wider time slot to collect and redeliver customers laundry so that orders can be grouped together and we can use less fuel. As well as our eco routes, Laundryheap also uses e-bikes in certain areas to reduce the carbon emissions emitted whilst picking up and delivering laundry.

To book your Laundryheap service simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.

Photo by Julia M Cameron from Pexels


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Laundry essentials for freshers

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Going to university is exciting. For many, it marks the beginning of adult life. You are living on your own, maybe for the first time, potentially in a brand new town, city, or even country. But, amongst the excitement and fun, don’t forget about your laundry.

  • Laundry basket
  • Laundry detergent 
  • Fabric softener
  • Dryer ball/sheets
  • Colour catching sheets
  • Stain remover
  • Laundry bag 
  • Collapsable drying rack 
  • Change
  • Laundryheap

Laundry basket

A laundry basket is a basic essential. It will help you to transport your laundry from your room to the laundromat, to the washing machine, to the dryer, and back to your room. There are many different types of laundry baskets so you will definitely be able to find one within your budget. A pro freshers tip is to buy a collapsible laundry basket. It is unlikely that you will be inundated with space in your room, so a collapsible basket will help you save space. 

Image by Santeri Viinamäki

Laundry detergent

You can’t do your laundry without laundry detergent. You can choose between powder, liquid, and pods, with your cheapest option being powder. When you are shopping for your laundry detergent, consider buying an antibacterial detergent. 90% of freshers get freshers-flu within their first term at university, and antibacterial laundry detergent will ensure that your clothing is both clean and disinfected. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Fabric softener 

Fabric softener will maintain the softness of your clothing and make your garments smell amazing. If you have sensitive skin, fabric softener can help with irritation as it smooths the fibres in your clothing, making them less abrasive against your skin. Simply add a capful of fabric softener to every load of your laundry and your clothes will smell and feel divine for weeks. 

Photo by George Milton from Pexels

Dryer balls/sheets

Investing in dryer balls/sheets could save you a small fortune. Dryer balls and sheets can be added to your tumble dryer to reduce drying time and limit the static on your clothing. Simply add 2-3 balls or sheets to each load and your drying time will be cut by at least 10%. This may not seem like a huge amount of time, but when you are paying to use a dryer per minute/hour, 10% could end up saving you a lot of money.

Image by trenttsd

Colour catching sheets

To maintain the colour and quality of your clothing it’s always best to wash your colours and whites separately. That being said, when you are a student, paying to use a washing machine per load, exceptions can be made. Buy yourself a box of colour catching sheets and save yourself the hassle of separating your laundry and paying to use the washing machine twice. These sheets will catch any colour runs, and prevent your whites from turning grey. 

Photo by Ketut Subiyanto from Pexels

Stain remover 

Whether you are a fresher or not, stain remover is always useful to have in your cupboard. Stain remover is great for pre-treating tough stains or adding to your washing machine to lift smaller, fresher, stains. If you do stain your clothing and don’t have any stain remover, you can use alternatives such as lemon juice and baking soda. 

Image by ajay_suresh

Laundry bag

When you do your laundry you may notice that your socks go into the machine in a pair, but come out single. Do not risk losing your socks and instead buy a laundry bag. These small bags are the perfect size for washing your socks and will guarantee that you never lose one again. Laundry bags are also incredibly useful when washing delicate underwear. 

Photo by Susanne Jutzeler from Pexels

Collapsible drying rack 

It is not guaranteed that your laundromat will have tumble dryers, and you may also not want to pay to use one. If either of these scenarios is the case, you may want to invest in a collapsible drying rack. These racks are perfect for hanging your clothes on in the comfort of your own room. Simply fold it out, hang your clothes, and leave them for a day or two to dry. Once your clothes are dry, simply fold your rack away and store it somewhere safe. It may take slightly longer for your clothing to dry this way, but you will save yourself money and your drying rack will not take up unnecessary space. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Change

When using a laundromat it is essential that you have change with you. Some laundromats do accept card payments, however, it is not always guaranteed. Stay prepared by always taking a small amount of change with you when you go to the laundromat. That way, regardless of whether your laundromat accepts cards or not, you are guaranteed to have clean laundry at the end of the day. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Laundryheap

Nobody enjoys doing laundry, and you shouldn’t let the chore take away from your fresher’s experience. If you live in student accommodation and want a helping hand with your laundry, head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to make your booking today. Use the code STDNT7 for 7% off of your first order.

Enjoy your freshers!


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Pre-treatment alternatives

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

The best way to remove stains is to pre-treat them. If you don’t have any pre-treatment products, pre-treat your stains with these alternatives. 

  • Baking soda
  • Lemon/lime
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Corn starch 
  • Salt
  • Dish soap
  • Laundry detergent 

Baking soda

Baking soda is particularly useful at pre-treating odorous wet stains, such as coffee. The powdery consistency sucks up the wetness of the stain, whilst absorbing the odour, leaving your clothing with an odourless and smaller stain. Make sure to always brush off the baking soda before washing your garment. Alternatively, you can make a baking soda paste by mixing two parts baking soda with one part water. Spreading the paste over your stain will help to loosen it from the fibres of your clothing

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Lemon/lime

The natural acidity in lemon and lime acts as a natural bleaching agent. Squeezing lemon or lime juice directly over the stain will begin bleaching it, making the stain lighter and easier to remove in the wash. Be warned that using lemon or lime juice on coloured clothing may cause discolouration, so use with caution or only on white clothing. It is particularly effective on yellow underarm and rust stains

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Hydrogen peroxide

Similarly to lemon and lime, hydrogen peroxide is a natural bleaching agent. Simply pour or spray a small amount of the solution on to your stain, and allow it to sit for 10 minutes. The hydrogen peroxide will begin to break down and lift your stain, making it easier for it to be completely lifted in the wash. After 10 minutes, wash your garment as you usually would, and observe as your clothing becomes completely stain-free. 

Image by Duncan Creamer

Corn starch

If you have an oily or greasy stain, immediately sprinkle corn starch over it. Make sure that your stain is completely covered by the corn starch, and leave it to sit for at least 10 minutes. The small particles that make up the corn starch will begin absorbing the stain, lifting it from your garment. If you catch your stain quick enough, the corn starch alone may be enough to lift your stain completely. If not, wash your item as you usually would. 

Image by JaBB

Salt 

Salt works in a similar way to corn starch, particularly on red wine stains. The particles that make up the salt absorb the stain, leaving a smaller and more manageable stain behind. Sprinkle your red wine stain with a liberal amount of salt, the cheaper the better, and leave it to sit for at least 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, brush the salt from your garment and observe whether your stain has reduced in size and become lighter. If not, you may want to apply more salt and leave it for longer. 

Photo by Castorly Stock from Pexels

Dish soap 

Dish soap is manufactured to tackle greasy and oily substances. To remove stains using dish soap, squirt a small amount directly onto the stain, and use your fingers, or a soft-bristled brush, to rub it in. Leave it to sit for 10 minutes, before rinsing it from your stain, and washing as you usually would. 

Photo by Vivaan Rupani from Pexels

Laundry detergent 

Laundry detergent is specially formulated to lift dirt from clothing, which makes it a great pre-treatment. You can use laundry detergent in the same way as you would use dish soap. Rub a small amount directly onto your stain, leave it to sit for 10 minutes, and then rinse it from your garment. It’s best, and easiest, to use liquid laundry detergent. Alternatively, you can make a paste from powdered laundry detergent and water which you can spread directly onto your stain. 

Image by ajay_suresh

The best way to treat any stain is to let us do it for you. Book your Laundryheap order by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to remove beetroot stains

Image by Nick Collins from Pixabay

Beetroot is both delicious and it’s vibrant purple colour brightens up any dish. That being said, it is a natural, and permanent, dye, which makes beetroot stains on clothing lethal. Catch your stain early, and follow these steps, to ensure that your stain is lifted and your clothing isn’t dyed forever. 

  • Machine washable clothing 
  • Dry clean only clothing
  • Laundryheap

Machine washable clothing 

To remove beetroot stains from machine washable clothing you will need…
  • Kitchen towel
  • Cold water
  • Laundry detergent 
  • Washing machine 
  • Chlorine bleach or colour-safe bleach (optional)

To begin removing your beetroot stain, soak a kitchen towel in cold water and gently blot at the stain. Make sure that you are blotting and not rubbing the stain as rubbing will only set the beetroot further into your garment. As you blot, you should notice the stain transferring to your kitchen cloth. Continue blotting until you are satisfied that no more of the stain will be lifted. 

Once you are finished blotting, place your stain under a cold running tap. The water should turn a light purple colour as a result of it pushing more of the beetroot from your clothing. Continue holding your garment under the water until it runs clear. 

After dabbing and holding it under cold water your stain may be lifted. If it has not, gently work a small amount of laundry detergent into the area, and leave it to sit for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, rinse the laundry detergent from your garment, gently rubbing your stain with your fingers to encourage it to lift with the detergent. Continue rinsing until all of the detergent has been removed. 

Once you have removed the detergent from your garment, check to see if your stain has lightened in colour or been lifted. If it has, wash your garment in your washing machine as you usually would. If your stain is still vibrant and visible, repeat the previous steps. 

An alternative solution to lift your stain is to soak your item in chlorine or a colour safe bleach. Submerge your garment in a mixture of bleach and cold water for a minimum of 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, remove your item from the bleach solution and wash as you usually would.

Photo by Eva Elijas from Pexels

Dry clean only clothing 

To remove beetroot stains from dry clean only clothing you will need…
  • Dry cloth 
  • Damp sponge 
  • Bread (optional)

Begin lifting your beetroot stain by blotting it with a clean dry cloth. Similarly to with machine washable clothing, you must make sure that you are blotting not rubbing the stain. This will help to soak up any excess beetroot liquid and begin lifting the stain. Continue to dab until no more colour is transferred to the cloth. 

Next, dampen a clean sponge with cold water, and place it directly over the stain, making sure that it covers the full area. Do not rub or move the sponge as this can cause the beetroot to set further into the fibres of your garment. The sponge will begin absorbing the beetroot from your clothing, lifting it from your item and on to the sponge. After 5 minutes, check how much of your stain has been absorbed, and, if necessary, re-dampen the sponge and place it back on your stain for a further 5 minutes. Repeat this process until your stain has been lifted. 

If you do not have a clean sponge on hand, an alternative option is to use bread. In the same way as you would use the sponge, dampen the bread using cold water and place it over the stain. The bread will absorb the beetroot from your garment, lifting the stain. 

Once you have used either a sponge or bread to lift your beetroot stain, take a clean, dry, cloth and dab at any remnants of the stain. This should leave you with stain-free clothing

Image by Marco Verch Professional P

Laundryheap 

If you are struggling to lift your beetroot stain, or any other stain for that matter, let us take care of it for you. All you have to do is left us know what the stain is and where it is located, and we will do the rest. To book your Laundryheap order head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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The 5 stains of an afternoon tea

Photo by Sebastian Coman Photography from Pexels

There is nothing quite as satisfying, and delicious, as an afternoon tea. A smorgasbord of finger sandwiches, patisserie, scones, and, to top it all off, a glorious cup of tea. If you are enjoying your afternoon tea so much that you manage to spill some down yourself, don’t panic, follow these steps, and your clothing will be good as new. 

  • Tea
  • Clotted cream 
  • Mayonnaise
  • Cream cheese
  • Custard

Tea

You can’t have an afternoon tea without tea- it’s quite literally in the name. If your tea manages to escape your cup and dribble on your clothing, lift the stain following these simple steps. 

To remove a fresh tea stain you will need… 
  • Warm water
  • Laundry detergent 
  • Washing machine

If you catch your tea stain immediately, begin by flushing as much of it from your clothing as possible with warm water. Gently pour the warm water over the stain so that it runs through your garment, and continue this for at least 15 seconds. 

Once you are satisfied that you have flushed out as much of the tea as possible, rub a few drops of laundry detergent onto your stain until it lathers. Make sure that you target both sides of the stain in order for it to be successfully lifted. 

After your stained item has become well lathered on both sides, rinse the detergent using warm water. Continue to rinse until all of the detergent has been removed from your item. 

Finally, put your stained garment into the washing machine, and wash as you usually would. Once your cycle has finished, your stain should be completely removed.

If your tea stain remains, it may have already set into the fibers of your clothing. If this is the case, an alternative method must be used. 

To remove an old tea stain you will need… 
  • White vinegar
  • Laundry powder
  • Lukewarm water
  • Washing machine

The best way to remove an old tea stain is by making a paste from equal parts white vinegar, laundry powder, and lukewarm water. For the most effective paste use two tablespoons of each ingredient. 

Rub you paste directly onto your stain using your fingers. Alternatively, you can use a soft-bristled brush or clean white cloth. Using your chosen tool, work your paste into your stain until it has been completely covered. 

Once you are satisfied that your paste has been worked into your stain, rinse your garment with lukewarm water until all of the paste has been removed. If you notice a tea stain still on your garment, work more paste into the stain and re-rinse. 

Wash your garment in your washing machine as you usually would. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Clotted cream

Jam and clotted cream are the perfect accompaniment to a freshly baked scone. The only question is, do you put the jam or the cream on first? More importantly, how do you remove a clotted cream stain if a blob makes its way onto your clothing?

To remove a clotted cream stain you will need…
  • Spoon or blunt knife
  • Coldwater
  • Liquid laundry detergent 
  • Washing machine 

The most important thing to remember with any cream stain is to tackle it as soon as possible or it will turn yellow and be much harder to remove. 

To begin removing your clotted cream stain, first remove as much of the solid cream as possible using a spoon or a blunt knife. Be careful if you are using a knife as you don’t want to push too hard and damage the fibers of your item. 

After removing as much solid cream as possible, turn your garment inside out and flush your stain with cold water. A clotted cream stain is made from protein which, if exposed to warm or hot water will curdle and set the stain deeper into your fabric. 

Once you have flushed as much of your stain as possible, pour a small amount of liquid laundry detergent directly onto the stain and work it in using your fingers. You want to use a detergent containing enzymes as these will help to break down the protein in the clotted cream. After working your detergent into your stain, soak it in cold water for a minimum of 30 minutes. If your stain is not fresh, you may want to leave it soaking for longer, potentially overnight. 

After soaking your stain, remove your garment from the water, and wash as you usually would. After washing, if you notice that your stain has not completely lifted, repeat the process and try soaking your item for longer. 

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Mayonnaise 

Part of the afternoon tea experience is enjoying a selection of finger sandwiches, many of which will contain mayonnaise. It is only too easy for a blob of mayonnaise to fall from within the crusts of your sanwich and land directly on your outfit. If this is the case, follow these simple steps. 

To remove a mayonnaise stain you will need…
  • Blunt knife or spoon
  • Heavy-duty liquid laundry detergent 
  • Washing machine 

Begin removing your stain by using a blunt knife or spoon to lift as much solid mayonnaise as possible. Be careful to not push too hard on your garment or you risk causing rips and tears. 

After removing as much of your mayonnaise as possible, pre-treat your stain using heavy-duty liquid laundry detergent. You must make sure that your detergent is heavy-duty so that it can break down the oils in the stain. Use your fingers, or a soft-bristled brush, to gently rub your detergent in. Continue rubbing until you are satisfied that the detergent has been adequately rubbed into your stain. 

Allow your detergent to sit for at least 15 minutes, before washing your garment in the washing machine, using the hottest temperature on your items care label. Once your item has completed its cycle, remove it from the washing machine and check that your stain has been completely removed. If your stain remains, repeat the process. 

Image by Marco Verch Professional Photographer

Cream cheese

Aside from mayonnaise-based fillings, salmon and cream cheese is a very popular finger sandwich filling for afternoon tea. Like mayonnaise, cream cheese can also easily escape from your bread and find its way onto your clothing. 

To remove a cream cheese stain you will need…
  • Blunt knife or spoon
  • Heavy-duty liquid laundry detergent
  • Washing machine 

Begin removing your cream cheese stain by using a blunt knife or spoon to lift as much solid cream cheese from your clothing as possible. Do not use a cloth to rub at the cream cheese as this will only set the stain further into your item and make it harder to remove. 

After removing as much solid cream cheese as possible, work a few drops of heavy-duty liquid laundry detergent into your stain. The heavy-duty detergent contains enzymes that will break down the oils in the stain and help to lift it. After working your detergent into your stain, set your garment to one side and allow it to sit for at least 15 minutes. 

Finally, wash your item as you usually would. This is the final step in dissolving and lifting the oils and proteins that make up the stain. After washing, check that your stain has been completely lifted prior to drying. If it has not, repeat the process and try leaving your detergent to penetrate your stain for longer. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Custard 

The final component to any successful afternoon tea is a delightful selection of cakes, many of which are filled with custard. As delicious as these cakes are, when you bite into them, the custard has a nasty habit of squirting out and landing on clean clothing. 

To remove a custard stain you will need…
  • A spoon or blunt knife
  • Coldwater
  • Heavy-duty liquid laundry detergent 
  • Hot water
  • Chlorine bleach or colour safe bleach
  • Washing machine 

Begin removing your custard stain by lifting as much of it from your garment as possible using a blunt knife or spoon. Be careful when doing this as custard can be slippery and you don’t want to risk spreading the stain to other parts of your garment

Once you have removed as much of the stain as possible, turn your item inside out and flush the stain with cold water. This will help to push out as much of the custard from the fibers of your clothing as possible. 

When you are satisfied that you can not flush out any more custard with cold water, use a heavy-duty laundry detergent to pre-treat your stain. Rub the detergent into the stained area using your fingers, or a soft-bristled brush if you so wish, making sure that it is rubbed into the whole of your stain. Leave your detergent to sit for a minimum of 15 minutes to ensure that your stain has been adequately penetrated. 

Next, wash your stained item at the hottest temperature that the care label will allow, adding chlorine bleach if your item is white, or colour-safe bleach if not. The bleach will help to break down and lift any remaining stain that the detergent failed to remove. 

Once your cycle is complete, remove your item and check that the stain has been lifted. If not, repeat the process until the full stain is removed. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Afternoon tea is fun, and something that should not be spoiled by stains or the worry of having to remove them. Instead, enjoy your afternoon tea with the knowledge that we can lift your stains for you. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your order now. 


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Tips to remove damp smells

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The smell of damp on your clothing means that mould or mildew is growing on the material. This can happen if your clothes are left in a dark and humid environment for too long, or if your washing machine has mould or mildew growing in it. If you notice your clothing smelling damp, try these tips to remove the smell. 

  • Hot water
  • White vinegar
  • Baking soda
  • Bleach
  • Prevention
  • Laundryheap

Hot water 

When washing damp smelling clothing, always use hot water. The hot water will not kill the mould or mildew, however the heat will help to evaporate it, thus removing it from your clothing. Before using hot water on your clothes, always check the care label

White vinegar

The acid found in white vinegar makes it an excellent way to kill mould and mildew and remove damp smells from clothing. To use white vinegar as a pre-treatment for damp clothes, mix one cup with a bucket of warm water and leave your clothing to soak for at least an hour.  Alternatively, add one or two cups of white vinegar directly to your washing machine for the same effect. 

Image by NatureFriend from Pixabay

Baking soda 

Baking soda is incredibly useful at absorbing smells and moisture from clothing, making it perfect for lifting damp smells. Simply add a quarter to half a cup of baking soda directly to your washing machine, and use the hottest temperature your clothing will allow. The baking soda will absorb the dampness in your clothing along with the horrendous smell, and leave your clothes smelling and feeling fresh. 

Image by Aqua Mechanical

Bleach

Bleach is incredibly effective at removing damp from clothing, however should only be used on white clothing. Soak your damp smelling items in one part bleach and 3 parts hot water for a minimum of 30 minutes. The bleach will penetrate your clothing, killing any mould or mildew and lifting the smell of damp. Before using bleach, you may want to test it on an unseen bit of your garment, such as the hem, to make sure that it won’t permanently stain. 

Image by Mike Mozart

Prevention

Now that you have removed the smell of damp from your clothing, here are 5 tips to help prevent mould and mildew from building up on your clothing again. 

  1. Avoid damp clothing

Never hang or fold clothing whilst it is still damp, instead, wait until it has completely dried. Storing clothing whilst it’s still damp creates the perfect damp and humid environment for mould and mildew to grow, leading to clothing smelling damp.

  1. Vaccum seal 

If you know that you won’t be wearing certain garments for a while, for example summer items during the winter, vacuum seal your clothing. This will help keep any mould or mildew out, and leave your clothing smelling fresh until you’re ready the wear them again. 

  1. Have a clear out

An overflowing wardrobe is the perfect environment for mould and mildew to grow. If you notice that your wardrobe is becoming slightly too full, it may be time for a clear out. Get rid, or vacuum seal, the clothing you don’t wear anymore, and give your everyday items room to breathe. Your clothing will thank you for it. 

  1. Clean your machine 

Your clothing may be smelling damp because your washing machine needs to be cleaned. It is vital to clean your washing machine at least once a month to avoid your clothing smelling damp, and to keep your washing machine working properly. 

  1. Reduce your detergent 

Using too much detergent in your washing machine creates a thin layer on your clothing that prevents future washes from properly penetrating your items and removing bacteria. As such, make sure that you always use the recommended amount of detergent in your washing machine. More detergent does not mean cleaner clothes. 

Photo by Ksenia Chernaya from Pexels

Laundryheap 

To guarantee that your clothing doesn’t smell damp, let Laundryheap wash them for you. We will pick up, launder, and redeliver your clothing to you, completely on your schedule. To book your order simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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Packing hacks

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Packing to go on holiday can be stressful. There never seems to be enough room in your suitcase, clothing gets creased, and something always seems to spill. Try these packing hacks to avoid any further packing disasters. 

  • Take a large carry-on
  • Be sensible with your carry-on
  • Know what you’re taking
  • Take versatile clothing
  • Roll don’t fold
  • Pack shoes first
  • Utilise shoe space
  • Invest in liquid bottles
  • Ziplock bags
  • Dryer sheets in your case

Take a large carry-on 

Your carry-on is the perfect place to store any overspill from your suitcase. It’s always best to check with your airline prior to packing, however, the average size of a carry-on is 22”-14”-9”. It’s best to take the biggest carry-on you can, not just for extra clothing and holiday essentials, but for any gifts you may buy on your travels. 

Image by ivabalk from Pixabay

Be sensible with your carry-on

Not only should you be using the biggest carry-on you are allowed, but you should be using that space wisely. Your carry-on should be used as an emergency bag in case your suitcase gets lost. Make sure that you pack some clothing, essential toiletries, and any items you may need for the first 24-48 hours of your holiday. It’s terrible to think about your luggage going missing, but it’s best to be prepared. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Know what you’re taking

No matter how long you are away, it’s always best to pre-plan your outfits. This will help you to limit the amount of unnecessary clothing you pack and leave you more space for toiletries and other essentials. Make sure that you pack enough outfits to last your whole trip, but be mindful of the amount of space you have in your suitcase and carry-on.

Photo by Liza Summer from Pexels

Take versatile clothing

One of the best ways to save space when packing for a holiday is to take versatile clothing. Try and take items that can be worn every day and that can be easily transferred from day to night. Think of ways you can use accessories and shoes to dress up or dress down an outfit. 

Photo by Asad Photo Maldives from Pexels

Roll don’t fold 

Although it may feel natural to fold, always roll. Rolling your clothing will conserve precious space in your suitcase and also limit creases in your garments. You can roll items individually, or roll your outfits for each day together, it’s completely up to you, just avoid folding at all costs. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Pack shoes first 

Shoes are the most awkward item to pack. They are an awkward shape that never seem to fit properly in your suitcase, and they usually end up bent and creased. It’s best practice to pack your shoes first for two reasons. Firstly, if you have any dirt or debris on the bottom of your shoes it won’t be transferred onto your clothing. Secondly, you can fit your more pliable items, such as clothing, around your shoes, utilising the little space you have. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Utilise shoe space 

As we’ve established, shoes are an awkward shape, which means they also take up quite a lot of space. Use your shoes as extra storage for smaller items. Underwear, toiletries, and accessories are all items small enough to fit inside your shoes rather than letting them take up valuable bag space. Just make sure you spray your shoes before inserting anything into them to avoid your underwear smelling of feet. 

Photo by Lum3n from Pexels

Invest in travel bottles 

If you are storing your liquids in your carry on you will have to adhere to the 100ml’s limit per item. To help you stick to this limit, invest in travel bottles- small bottles that hold no more than 100 ml’s. You can pour your toiletries into each bottle and shake off the worry of carrying more liquid than you are allowed. What’s more, these bottles are reusable so you will have them on-hand for your next holiday.

Ziploc bags 

It can be incredibly annoying when you open your case to find the perfect accessory to finish your outfit, and you just can’t seem to find it. Never lose your accessories, and smaller items, on holiday again by storing them in a Ziploc bag. You can even store your Ziploc in one of your shoes

Image by SonnyandSandy

Dryer sheets in your case 

Keep your suitcase and its contents smelling fresh by placing a handful of dryer sheets throughout your case. They will absorb any musty smells, and ensure that you get fresh smelling clothes every day of your holiday. 

Image by trenttsd

If you run out of clothing during your holiday, don’t panic. We work internationally to ensure that our customers can have fresh and clean clothing wherever they are. To check that we service your area, and to book your Laundryheap order, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.