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Tips to remove damp smells

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

The smell of damp on your clothing means that mould or mildew is growing on the material. This can happen if your clothes are left in a dark and humid environment for too long, or if your washing machine has mould or mildew growing in it. If you notice your clothing smelling damp, try these tips to remove the smell. 

  • Hot water
  • White vinegar
  • Baking soda
  • Bleach
  • Prevention
  • Laundryheap

Hot water 

When washing damp smelling clothing, always use hot water. The hot water will not kill the mould or mildew, however the heat will help to evaporate it, thus removing it from your clothing. Before using hot water on your clothes, always check the care label

White vinegar

The acid found in white vinegar makes it an excellent way to kill mould and mildew and remove damp smells from clothing. To use white vinegar as a pre-treatment for damp clothes, mix one cup with a bucket of warm water and leave your clothing to soak for at least an hour.  Alternatively, add one or two cups of white vinegar directly to your washing machine for the same effect. 

Image by NatureFriend from Pixabay

Baking soda 

Baking soda is incredibly useful at absorbing smells and moisture from clothing, making it perfect for lifting damp smells. Simply add a quarter to half a cup of baking soda directly to your washing machine, and use the hottest temperature your clothing will allow. The baking soda will absorb the dampness in your clothing along with the horrendous smell, and leave your clothes smelling and feeling fresh. 

Image by Aqua Mechanical

Bleach

Bleach is incredibly effective at removing damp from clothing, however should only be used on white clothing. Soak your damp smelling items in one part bleach and 3 parts hot water for a minimum of 30 minutes. The bleach will penetrate your clothing, killing any mould or mildew and lifting the smell of damp. Before using bleach, you may want to test it on an unseen bit of your garment, such as the hem, to make sure that it won’t permanently stain. 

Image by Mike Mozart

Prevention

Now that you have removed the smell of damp from your clothing, here are 5 tips to help prevent mould and mildew from building up on your clothing again. 

  1. Avoid damp clothing

Never hang or fold clothing whilst it is still damp, instead, wait until it has completely dried. Storing clothing whilst it’s still damp creates the perfect damp and humid environment for mould and mildew to grow, leading to clothing smelling damp.

  1. Vaccum seal 

If you know that you won’t be wearing certain garments for a while, for example summer items during the winter, vacuum seal your clothing. This will help keep any mould or mildew out, and leave your clothing smelling fresh until you’re ready the wear them again. 

  1. Have a clear out

An overflowing wardrobe is the perfect environment for mould and mildew to grow. If you notice that your wardrobe is becoming slightly too full, it may be time for a clear out. Get rid, or vacuum seal, the clothing you don’t wear anymore, and give your everyday items room to breathe. Your clothing will thank you for it. 

  1. Clean your machine 

Your clothing may be smelling damp because your washing machine needs to be cleaned. It is vital to clean your washing machine at least once a month to avoid your clothing smelling damp, and to keep your washing machine working properly. 

  1. Reduce your detergent 

Using too much detergent in your washing machine creates a thin layer on your clothing that prevents future washes from properly penetrating your items and removing bacteria. As such, make sure that you always use the recommended amount of detergent in your washing machine. More detergent does not mean cleaner clothes. 

Photo by Ksenia Chernaya from Pexels

Laundryheap 

To guarantee that your clothing doesn’t smell damp, let Laundryheap wash them for you. We will pick up, launder, and redeliver your clothing to you, completely on your schedule. To book your order simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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Packing hacks

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Packing to go on holiday can be stressful. There never seems to be enough room in your suitcase, clothing gets creased, and something always seems to spill. Try these packing hacks to avoid any further packing disasters. 

  • Take a large carry-on
  • Be sensible with your carry-on
  • Know what you’re taking
  • Take versatile clothing
  • Roll don’t fold
  • Pack shoes first
  • Utilise shoe space
  • Invest in liquid bottles
  • Ziplock bags
  • Dryer sheets in your case

Take a large carry-on 

Your carry-on is the perfect place to store any overspill from your suitcase. It’s always best to check with your airline prior to packing, however, the average size of a carry-on is 22”-14”-9”. It’s best to take the biggest carry-on you can, not just for extra clothing and holiday essentials, but for any gifts you may buy on your travels. 

Image by ivabalk from Pixabay

Be sensible with your carry-on

Not only should you be using the biggest carry-on you are allowed, but you should be using that space wisely. Your carry-on should be used as an emergency bag in case your suitcase gets lost. Make sure that you pack some clothing, essential toiletries, and any items you may need for the first 24-48 hours of your holiday. It’s terrible to think about your luggage going missing, but it’s best to be prepared. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Know what you’re taking

No matter how long you are away, it’s always best to pre-plan your outfits. This will help you to limit the amount of unnecessary clothing you pack and leave you more space for toiletries and other essentials. Make sure that you pack enough outfits to last your whole trip, but be mindful of the amount of space you have in your suitcase and carry-on.

Photo by Liza Summer from Pexels

Take versatile clothing

One of the best ways to save space when packing for a holiday is to take versatile clothing. Try and take items that can be worn every day and that can be easily transferred from day to night. Think of ways you can use accessories and shoes to dress up or dress down an outfit. 

Photo by Asad Photo Maldives from Pexels

Roll don’t fold 

Although it may feel natural to fold, always roll. Rolling your clothing will conserve precious space in your suitcase and also limit creases in your garments. You can roll items individually, or roll your outfits for each day together, it’s completely up to you, just avoid folding at all costs. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Pack shoes first 

Shoes are the most awkward item to pack. They are an awkward shape that never seem to fit properly in your suitcase, and they usually end up bent and creased. It’s best practice to pack your shoes first for two reasons. Firstly, if you have any dirt or debris on the bottom of your shoes it won’t be transferred onto your clothing. Secondly, you can fit your more pliable items, such as clothing, around your shoes, utilising the little space you have. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Utilise shoe space 

As we’ve established, shoes are an awkward shape, which means they also take up quite a lot of space. Use your shoes as extra storage for smaller items. Underwear, toiletries, and accessories are all items small enough to fit inside your shoes rather than letting them take up valuable bag space. Just make sure you spray your shoes before inserting anything into them to avoid your underwear smelling of feet. 

Photo by Lum3n from Pexels

Invest in travel bottles 

If you are storing your liquids in your carry on you will have to adhere to the 100ml’s limit per item. To help you stick to this limit, invest in travel bottles- small bottles that hold no more than 100 ml’s. You can pour your toiletries into each bottle and shake off the worry of carrying more liquid than you are allowed. What’s more, these bottles are reusable so you will have them on-hand for your next holiday.

Ziploc bags 

It can be incredibly annoying when you open your case to find the perfect accessory to finish your outfit, and you just can’t seem to find it. Never lose your accessories, and smaller items, on holiday again by storing them in a Ziploc bag. You can even store your Ziploc in one of your shoes

Image by SonnyandSandy

Dryer sheets in your case 

Keep your suitcase and its contents smelling fresh by placing a handful of dryer sheets throughout your case. They will absorb any musty smells, and ensure that you get fresh smelling clothes every day of your holiday. 

Image by trenttsd

If you run out of clothing during your holiday, don’t panic. We work internationally to ensure that our customers can have fresh and clean clothing wherever they are. To check that we service your area, and to book your Laundryheap order, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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Energy-saving laundry tips

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An average washing machine will use 350 watts of energy for one 30 minute cycle. This translates into 36,400 watts per year. There are some simple ways to save energy when doing laundry.  

  • Wash at a cooler temperature
  • Hand wash
  • Wash full loads
  • Use a high spin speed
  • Air dry clothes 
  • Don’t use timed cycles
  • Clean your dryer
  • Use dryer balls
  • Turn off your machines
  • Make sure your machines are energy efficient

Wash at a cooler temperature

Lower washing machine temperatures use less energy, and most laundry detergents work perfectly fine in temperatures of 30 degrees Celsius or cooler. There are times when you will need to use a hot wash, such as when washing heavily soiled items or disinfecting clothing, however, for your average wash, 30 degrees or lower will work just as well. 

Photo by Teona Swift from Pexels

Hand wash

If you only have a couple of items to wash, and they aren’t heavily soiled, then save energy by hand washing them. Fill a basin with lukewarm water, add your detergent, and submerge your items. Use kneading and swishing motions to ensure that the detergent has been adequately worked into your items, before rinsing them off in clean water, and leaving them to dry. Hand washing works just as well as its machine alternative and uses a lot less energy. 

Photo by Teona Swift from Pexels

Wash full loads

It can be tempting to wash your clothes as soon as you notice your laundry piling up, but it’s best to wait until you can fill your washing machine. Doing half loads of washing throughout the week will use more energy, and more time, than doing one or two big loads once a week. If you need an item of clothing washed urgently, hand wash it instead. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Use a high spin speed

Increasing the spin speed of your washing machine will extract more water from your clothing and decrease drying time. Before selecting a higher spin speed, check that it won’t cause any damage to your clothing. High spin speeds should not be used on delicate items, such as silk, but are best for heavier materials, such as denim

Photo by Engin Akyurt from Pexels

Air dry clothes

There are many benefits to air drying your clothes besides saving energy. Drying clothes in their original shape reduces the number of wrinkles on the item, therefore meaning less, or even no, time spent ironing. Avoiding putting your clothes in a dryer can also help with their longevity. Rather than being tumbled in a machine until dry, air drying is much gentler on the fibres of your clothing, causing less risk of rips and tears. Additionally, if you dry your clothes outdoors, you will be left with the smell of fresh air every time you put on a new item. 

Photo by Olga Lioncat from Pexels

Don’t use timed cycles 

Despite the benefits of air drying, there are reasons why you may need to use a tumble dryer. If this is the case, save energy by avoiding timed cycles. Timed cycles work based on a time scale rather than whether your clothes are dry or not. For example, your clothing could be dry in 30 minutes, but if the cycle is running for an hour, the dryer won’t stop until that hour is up. Instead, use an automatic cycle, which uses moisture sensors to determine whether your clothes are dry. If your machine does not have an automatic cycle, keep checking the dryness of your clothes throughout the cycle.

Photo by Max Vakhtbovych from Pexels

Clean your dryer

Tumble dryers only work if they are regularly cleaned. If you do not regularly clean your tumble dryer then air can become trapped and your clothing will not dry as quickly, meaning that you use more energy. Make sure that your dryer has been adequately cleaned before putting clothing in it, and if it hasn’t clean it. Not only will it be more energy-efficient, but it could also prevent a fire. 

Use dryer balls

Dryer balls are small, round, balls of wool, rubber, or plastic that you put in your tumble dryer to reduce drying time by up to 25%. They work in a similar way to dryer sheets, however are much more environmentally conscious as they are reusable. If you don’t want to buy dryer balls you can easily make them. For single-use dryer balls, you can scrunch up tinfoil into a ball shape, or, for multi-use dryer balls use felted wool and follow this method

Turn off your machines

One of the easiest ways to save energy when doing your laundry is to make sure that your machines are turned off. Even if your machines aren’t running a cycle, if there are lights on then they are still using energy. After using your washing machine and tumble dryer, make sure that they are switched off and, for extra precaution, switch them off at the plug. This way, you will know for certain that they are using no energy at all. 

Make sure that your machines are energy efficient

Due to technological advances, most modern washing machines are much more energy efficient than older models. If your washing machine and tumble dryer are slightly older, you may want to invest in newer models. When shopping for a washing machine and tumble dryer, look out for a blue Energy Efficiency Recommended logo. These won’t be the cheapest machines so it will be an investment, but they will run much more efficiently and save you money in the long run. 

At Laundryheap we are constantly improving the way we work to be more efficient and environmentally conscious. To book your Laundryheap order, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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How to care for your kitchen textiles

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Surrounded by food and drink, it’s no surprise that our kitchen textiles can become filthy fast. Which is why we need to make sure that we are taking the proper care to both clean and disinfect them. 

  • Tea towels
  • Aprons
  • Oven gloves
  • Tablecloth
  • Napkin 

Tea towels 

Tea towels can always be relied upon to mop up spills and wet areas. They come into constant contact with a number of different bacteria throughout the day, which is why they should be washed at the end of every day. 

Tea towels are often made from linen, which is a very durable material. As such, you can wash them in your washing machine on a regular setting, at a temperature anywhere between 30 and 50 degrees Celsius. It is best to use a biological detergent to wash your tea towels as they contain enzymes that will help break down proteins, fats, and starches. After washing your tea towels, dry them completely, either by tumble drying them or leaving them to air dry, before reusing them. 

Photo by Alex Green from Pexels

Aprons 

Similarly to tea towels, aprons are prone to having food and drinks splashed onto them. If you wear your apron every day, you should wash it every other day, unless something spills on it that could stain in which case wash it immediately. 

Before washing your apron, first pre-treat any stains that you may have. Food stains, for example, can be incredibly stubborn and therefore hard to remove, so it’s best to pre-treat those before putting your apron straight in the washing machine. After pre-treating your stains, tie your apron strings together and place it in a mesh laundry bag. This will help prevent your apron strings from becoming tangled in your other washing. If your apron is white, you may want to use liquid chlorine bleach to maintain the crisp whiteness of your apron. If not, or if your apron is any other colour, then use an oxygenated detergent on a cold wash setting. Completely dry your apron before re-wearing. 

Photo by Klaus Nielsen from Pexels

Oven gloves

Oven gloves protect our hands when handling hot trays. In order to do this, they are made from an array of heat proof materials which need to be cared for when washing. To maintain the cleanliness of your oven gloves wash them every month, or when they become heavily stained. It’s important to always check your oven glove care label before washing.

To lift dried food stains from your oven gloves, begin by adding half a cup of mild laundry detergent to a gallon of warm water. Soak a dish cloth in the detergent, and then wring it out so it is damp. Gently dab your oven glove with the dish cloth, focusing on any particularly dirty spots. Continue dabbing until you are satisfied that all the dried food stains have been lifted, and then leave your oven glove to dry for 30 minutes.  

After 30 minutes, wash your oven glove in the washing machine per the care label instructions. If your oven gloves are particularly greasy, you may want to add baking soda to your washing machine. 

Tablecloth

Tablecloths are often used to decorate and protect a table from food and drink stains. As such, they should be cleaned every month to avoid them becoming dusty, or when they become heavily stained

If your tablecloth requires pre-treatment, e.g. if it has food stains on it, use your fingers or a soft bristled brush to rub heavy duty laundry detergent into the stains. Leave your detergent to sit for 15 minutes before putting your tablecloth in the washing machine. 

To machine wash your tablecloth, set your washing machine to a cool cycle and, if your machine has one, use a permanent press cycle. This will help reduce wrinkles on your tablecloth. Using a heavy duty laundry detergent will help to lift any stains on your table cloth, and fabric softener will provide a protective coating to your tablecloths fibres which will prevent food and drink stains from penetrating the fabric as quickly. 

To dry your tablecloth either tumble or air dry, however, if you are using a tumble dryer use a low heat setting. Make sure that your tablecloth is completely dry before putting it back on your table. 

Photo by Eli Verenich from Pexels

Napkins

Linen napkins are much more pleasing to the eye than the paper alternatives. They will often become heavily stained with food and drink, so it’s always best to hand wash them after every use to ensure that all stains are fully removed. 

To hand wash your napkins begin by filling a sink with warm water and adding a gentle laundry detergent. If your napkins are white, you may also want to add a small amount of bleach, or natural alternative, to maintain their crisp whiteness. Add your napkins to the water, and gently swish them in the water with your hands, rubbing and squeezing them to ensure that the detergent is being fully absorbed. You may want to use a soft bristled brush to scrub any particularly tough stains. Continue this until you are satisfied that your napkins have been cleaned and all stains have been removed. Remove your napkins from the detergent water and rinse them with clean lukewarm water. Continue rinsing until there is no detergent left. 

To dry your napkins, use a low heat setting on your tumble dryer or lay them on a flat surface to air dry. Make sure that all of your napkins are completely dry before reusing them. 

Photo by mali maeder from Pexels

If you are having difficulty cleaning your kitchen linens, let us do it for you. Laundryheap does not only wash and dry clean clothing, we also care for bed and kitchen linens. Book your Laundryheap order by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to remove blood stains

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Whether you have scraped your knee or accidentally cut yourself, blood stains are notorious for being difficult to remove. Follow these two methods, and find out how easy it can be to remove blood stains. 

  • Fresh blood 
  • Dried blood

Fresh blood

As with most stains, it’s easier to remove blood stains when they are fresh. 

To remove a fresh blood stain you will need:

  • Cold water
  • Washing up liquid 

Begin removing your stain by flushing it with cold water. Make sure that you’re using cold rather than hot water as hot water will only set your stain further into your clothing. 

Once you are satisfied that you have removed as much of the blood as possible via flushing, pour a small amount of washing-up liquid on the stain and gently work it in with your fingers. Be wary of being too rough with your fabric as this can damage the fibers of your clothing and cause the stain to set further into your item. 

After working your washing up liquid into your stain, rinse it off with cold water. If you can still see your stain, add more washing up liquid and repeat the process. 

When you are satisfied that your stain has been lifted, wash your garment as you usually would. Before drying your item, check that your stain has been completely removed. If it hasn’t, repeat the whole process. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Dried blood

Unfortunately, dried blood stains are a lot harder to remove than fresh blood because they have already set into the fibres of your garment. That does not, however, make them completely impossible to remove. 

To remove a dried blood stain you will need:

  • A blunt knife
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Paper towel
  • A clean cloth
  • Cold water 

To begin removing your dried blood stain use a blunt knife to scrape off as much of the blood as possible. Be careful that you don’t push too hard whilst scraping as this can cause rips in your garment. 

Once you are satisfied that you have removed as much of the dried blood as possible, apply a small amount of hydrogen peroxide directly on top of the stain. Before putting the peroxide on your stain, test it first on an unseen area of your garment, such as an inside seam. Hydrogen peroxide can cause discoloration on certain clothing items, so it’s best to check its effect on your stained item before placing it directly on your stain. 

Leave your hydrogen peroxide for 5 minutes, before using a paper towel to blot at it. You should notice your stain lifting from your garment and transferring on onto your paper towel. Be careful when blotting that you don’t push too hard as this could push the hydrogen peroxide and blood further into the fibers of your clothing

When you have lifted the majority of your hydrogen peroxide, and, subsequently, your stain, use a clean and damp cloth to gently rub the remaining stain until it has completely lifted. 

Finally, rinse the remaining hydrogen peroxide off of your garment using cold water. After this, wash your stained item as you usually would. If, after washing, your stain remains, repeat the process. 

Photo by Alex Green from Pexels

The best way to guarantee the removal of any stain is by letting us lift it for you. Book your Laundryheap order by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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How to remove hair dye stains

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Hair dye can be incredibly difficult to remove from clothing. If you have accidentally dripped some on yourself, this is how you can remove it. 

  • Before treating your stain
  • Black, brown, or blue hair dye 
  • Red hair dye

Before treating your stain

Before you begin treating your stain, check your item’s care label. If it says ‘dry-clean only’ do not treat the stain yourself. Instead, book your Laundryheap dry cleaning service and let us handle it. If your care label doesn’t say ‘dry-clean only’ you are safe to proceed. 

Black, brown, or blue hair dye

To treat your hair dye stain you will need…

  • A soft-bristled brush
  • Water
  • A basin 
  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent 
  • Oxygen-based bleach
  • Chlorine bleach (for white clothing)

Begin treating your stain by holding your garment under a cold water tap. This will help remove any hair dye lingering on the surface of your item. Make sure that you use cold water only as hot water will only aid the stain in setting further into your clothing

Next, pour a capful of heavy-duty laundry detergent over the stain and use a soft-bristled brush to gently rub it in. It’s best to use a laundry detergent with stain-lifting enzymes, so double check you are using the right detergent prior to pouring. Continue rubbing your stain for 5-15 minutes, or until you begin to see the hair dye become lighter in colour.

Once you are satisfied that your stain is a lighter colour, fill a basin with cold water and add oxygen-based bleach per the instructions on the packaging. Submerge your garment in the water and bleach mixture, making sure that the hair dye stain is completely in the water, and leave it to soak for at least 8 hours. 

After 8 hours, lift your item out of the water. If your stain has been removed, you can wash your item as you normally would. Should the stain remain, mix a fresh basin of cool water and oxygen-based bleach and leave your garment for another 8 hours. 

If your hair dye stain is on a white item of clothing and mix a solution of 1 gallon of water and 1-fourth a cup of chlorine bleach. Submerge your stained garment in this mixture, and leave it to soak for 15 minutes. Do not leave your item in the solution for any longer than 15 minutes as the chlorine bleach will begin to weaken the fabric. 

After 15 minutes, remove your item from the solution.

Removing red hair dye 

Red hair dye has a different composition than black, brown, or blue hair dye, and so the stain needs to be treated in a different way. 

To treat your hair dye stain you will need…

  • 2 soaking containers
  • Dishwashing liquid 
  • Ammonia
  • Distilled white vinegar 
  • Oxygen-based bleach 
  • Water 

As with removing black, brown, or blue hair dye, begin treatment by running your stained item under a cool water tap to remove any surface hair dye. 

Next, mix a solution of 1 quarter of water, one-half teaspoon of dishwashing liquid, and one tablespoon of ammonia, in a container. Submerge your stained garment in this solution and leave it to soak for 15 minutes. 

After 15 minutes, remove your garment from the solution and, using your fingers, rub the stained area. This will help loosen the hair dye and allow it to be removed from the fabric with greater ease. Once you have rubbed your stain for around 5-10 minutes, submerge it in the previously used solution for a further 15 minutes. 

Whilst your item is soaking, use a separate container to mix 1 quarter warm water with 1 quarter distilled white vinegar. Once your item has completed it’s 15-minute soak, rinse it well, and submerge it in your new solution. Leave your item to soak for 30 minutes. 

After 30 minutes, remove your garment from the solution. If your stain has been removed, wash your item as you usually would.

Should your stain remain, fill your sink with cold water and add oxygen-based bleach per the packet’s instructions. Submerge your stained item in the solution, and leave it to soak for 8 hours. If, after 8 hours, the stain has not been removed, repeat the process with fresh water and fresh oxygen-based bleach. 

The most effective way to remove any stain is to get it treated by a professional. When you book your Laundryheap service, let us know what item(s) of clothing is stained and where the stain(s) is located. To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to remove henna stains

If you’ve been left with a henna stain on your favourite outfit, this is how you remove it. 

  • What is henna?
  • Removing henna stains 
  • Laundryheap

What is henna?

Henna is a form of body art that originates from Ancient India. Decorative designs are painted onto the body using a plant-based dye, and it usually lasts for 2 weeks. In India, henna is associated with positive spirits and good luck. The night before an Indian wedding, the bride will take part in a Mehndi ceremony, where she will have her henna painted as a way to wish her good health and prosperity during her marriage. 

Removing henna stains 

If you get a henna stain on your clothing you must treat it as quickly as possible. It’s best to treat your stain immediately to prevent it from drying into the fabric of your clothing.

To remove a henna stain from your clothing you will need:

  • A cloth or paper towel
  • Laundry detergent 
  • A clean toothbrush
  • Cold water
  • Distilled white vinegar OR rubbing alcohol

To begin removing your henna stain, use a clean, absorbent, cloth, or paper towel, and blot the stained area. It is important that you do not rub the stain as this will only make it bigger. Instead, press your cloth, or paper towel, on top of the stain and allow your cloth to absorb the excess dye. Each time you blot the stain use a fresh section of the cloth to prevent the stain from spreading. 

After you have removed as much of the excess dye as possible, put a few drops of laundry detergent onto the stain, and use a clean toothbrush to scrub the detergent into the fabric. Continue scrubbing until you can no longer see the stain. Although it is important to be vigorous with your scrubbing in order to lift the stain, do be careful to not be overly harsh as this can result in your fabric becoming damaged. 

Once you can no longer see the stain, use cold water to rinse away the remaining detergent and dye. It is important that you use cold water rather than hot because hot water could set the stain. Keep rinsing your fabric until all of the detergent and dye has been removed. 

If you can still see your henna stain after rinsing the fabric, pour a small amount of distilled white vinegar or rubbing alcohol onto it. Let the fabric soak up the solution for an hour, before washing your item as you normally would. 

Should your clothing still be stained, repeat the process again. 

Laundryheap  

If you have a henna stain on your clothing, and are concerned about treating it yourself, send it to Laundryheap. We provide an abundance of services, from general washing to dry-cleaning, to fit all of your laundry needs. If your clothing is stained, simply write us a note in the order instructions explaining what item the stain is on, where, and what the stain is, and we will take every precaution possible to remove the stain for you. 

We are currently operating, contaclessly, in London, Manchester, Birmingham, Coventry, Dubai, Sharjah, Abu Dhab, Amsterdam, Haarlem, Rotterdam, The Hague, Copenhagen, Dublin, Doha, New York, Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Jose, Washington DC, Chicago, Kuwait City, Manama, and Singapore

To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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How to wash reusable nappies

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Reusable nappies are a great alternative to their single-use counterpart. Firstly, because they can be used multiple times, they reduce the amount of single-use plastic being used. In addition, because you don’t have to constantly re-buy nappies, you can save yourself a significant amount of money.

Here is how you keep re-usable nappies clean and ready for multiple uses. 

  • What are reusable nappies?
  • Are they as effective as single-use nappies? 
  • How to wash reusable cloth nappies

What are reusable nappies? 

Reusable nappies are nappies that can be used multiple times. They are often made from cotton, and are made up of an absorbent inner layer that contains a washable or disposable liner, and a waterproof outer layer. You can buy them in a range of sizes to fit all babies, and with a range of fastenings so you can decide which is easiest for you. In addition to the environmental and cost effective benefits of using reusable nappies, they are also chemical-free. 

Are they as effective as single-use nappies?

Reusable nappies are just as effective as single-use nappies. Before you use one it is advised to wash it so that the material becomes as absorbent as possible. Once you have done this you should not experience any difficulties with absorbency. 

If you are experiencing leaking it could be due to a detergent build-up, a poor fit, or a damaged PUL, which can happen if the nappy is dried at too high a heat. 

Image by Mahesh Patel from Pixabay

How to wash reusable nappies 

Begin by lifting the nappy liner out of the nappy. If you are using reusable nappy liners, shake any loose waste into the toilet. If you are using a disposable liner, dispose of it in the appropriate bin. 

Once the liner has been taken care of, place your nappy in a nappy bin, or any container with a tight-fitting lid. It’s always best to place a mesh laundry bag inside your container so that when it is full you don’t have to handle the individual nappies. 

When you have enough reusable nappies for a wash load, place them into your washing machine with a cap of non-bio powder. Avoid using liquid detergent and fabric softener as they can affect the absorbency of the material. Set your washing machine to 60 degrees to ensure that all the bacteria from the nappies is disposed of. Some antibacterial washing powders can clean in temperatures as low as 30 degrees, however, unless stated on the box, it’s best to wash your nappies at 60 degrees. 

Once your machine has finished, you can dry your nappies. It’s best to dry them in direct sunlight, however, if this is not achievable, you can tumble dry them on a low heat setting, or leave them on a drying rack

Reusable nappies need to be washed frequently, but, if you adequately care for them, they can last a lifetime. 

Image by Hannah Spray

Whilst you look after the reusable nappies, we’ll look after you. Book your Laundryheap service by visiting the Laundryheap website, or by downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to wash a bath mat

When it comes to doing laundry it’s important not to forget the household items that need to be regularly cleaned. This is how to wash your bath mat.

  • Why wash your bath mat?
  • How often should you wash your mat?
  • Using the washing machine 
  • Hand washing 
  • Leave it to the experts

Why wash your bath mat?

Bathrooms are the perfect environment for mold and bacteria. They are damp and humid, providing a ripe environment for mold to grow on every surface, including your bath mat. In addition to mold, bath mats can become slippy with oil buildup from spilled shower products. Regularly washing your bath mat will prevent these hazards.

 How often should you wash your mat?

Washing your bath mat largely depends on how many people use your bathroom and how often. This being said, as a rule of thumb, it is best to wash your bath mat at least once a week to prevent a build-up of bacteria and oil. 

Using the washing machine

The easiest way to wash your bath mat is by putting it in the washing machine. That being said, it is best to check the care label as it may be hand wash only. 

After checking your bath mats care label, take it outside and give it a good shake to remove any loose dirt. Shaking your mat out will also allow you to better see if there are any stains on your mat that need to be pre-treated. 

Once you have shaken out your mat, pre-treat any stains that you can see. You can use a standard stain remover or a natural stain remover, such as hydrogen peroxide. 

Next, put your bath mat in the washing machine as normal. It’s best to use a warm setting for your wash as you want to successfully get rid of any lingering bacteria. It is also best to wash your mat on its own as this will ensure it has optimal space in your washing machine and will guarantee a successful clean. 

When your wash is complete, dry your mat completely before putting it back in your bathroom. The best way to dry your mat is in the fresh air, however, if the weather does not permit this, you can use a low setting on your tumble dryer, or use a drying rack. If you are using a drying rack, make sure that there is ample ventilation to prevent musty smells and damp. 

Hand washing 

If you would prefer to not use your washing machine you can hand wash

Similarly to when using the washing machine, before you begin hand washing your mat shake it out to remove any loose dirt. 

To hand-wash your bath mat you will need to prepare a diluted bleach solution. It is best to do this in a bath or shallow sink so that you have plenty of room. Before preparing your bleach solution make sure that you are wearing gloves to protect your hands from coming into direct contact with the bleach. You must also ensure that your room is well ventilated to prevent the toxic fumes from the bleach causing you any harm. 

Begin preparing your bleach solution by adding one gallon of cold water to your bath or sink. For every one gallon of cold water that you add you can add one teaspoon of bleach. Depending on how long it has been since your bath mats last clean depends on how much bleach you decide to use. 

Once the diluted bleach solution has been made, place your bath mat in the solution and leave it to soak for three to four hours. 

After three to four hours, remove your bath mat and leave it to dry under the same instructions as when using a washing machine.

Finally, drain and rinse the bath/sink and clean away the dirt left behind from your bath mat.

Leave it to the experts 

If your bath mat is proving particularly difficult to clean, or you just don’t want to clean it yourself, leave it to us. We will pick up, professionally dry clean, and re-deliver your bath mat to you all within 24 hours. To book your dry cleaning service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 

We are now available in Los Angeles.


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Top tips for first time laundry doers

If this is your first time doing laundry, welcome to the adult world. Here are some beginners tips for you first time laundry doers. 

  • Plan ahead
  • Get the right equipment 
  • Separate your clothes
  • Read up about stains 
  • Don’t forget to dry your clothes
  • Fold straight away 
  • Don’t be afraid to ask questions
  • Leave it to the professionals

Plan ahead

When it comes to doing laundry it’s best to plan ahead. You need to have a rough idea of how much clothing and underwear you own so that you know when you will need to do your laundry without running out of things to wear. It’s best to evaluate your clothing situation and then assign yourself a day to do your laundry. This will help you motivate yourself to get your laundry done and help you plan your time around the task. 

Get the right equipment 

Before you even go near a washing machine you need to make sure that you have the appropriate equipment for doing your laundry. Consider what laundry detergent you want to use- do you want to use liquid or powder detergent? If you have sensitive skin, you need to find a detergent suitable for your skin type. Asides from detergent, make sure that you have fabric softener to maintain your clothing’s softness. There is no point in loading your washing machine with your dirty clothes if you don’t have the right equipment for your wash. 

Separate your clothes 

Once you’ve accumulated the equipment you need, you can then start separating your clothing. It’s important to know how to care for your clothing, so when you’re separating your clothes make sure that you’re checking the care labels on each item. You can separate by colour, fabric, or by washing temperature. It may take you a few washes to know which way is best for you to separate your clothes, but you will find a way that best suits you. 

Read up about stains 

It’s very easy to stain your clothing and, sometimes, not so easy to remove the stain. It’s always best to pre-treat a stain before putting it in the washing machine. To ensure that you pre-treat your stain in the best way possible, it’s always best to read up on the best stain treatments depending on the cause. 

Don’t forget to dry your clothes

Washing your clothes is only half the battle of doing laundry, you also need to dry them. Before you begin your laundry, make sure you have a way to suitably dry your clothing. This could be done using a tumble dryer, hanging your clothes on a washing line, or using a clothes horse. Whatever your method is, make sure that you have the equipment to dry your clothes in a speedy manner. 

Fold straight away 

It’s always best to get your laundry done as fast as possible, including folding and putting it away. It is very tempting to leave your clothes to dry for days on end whilst you complete other tasks, but don’t give in to this temptation. Not putting your clothes away straight away can lead items to crease and require ironing, which adds an extra task to your laundry list. 

Don’t be afraid to ask questions 

There is a lot to consider when you’re doing laundry- which laundry detergent to use, which fabric softener to use, how you are going to dry your clothes, what’s the best temperature for your clothes, etc. If you are unsure of any part of the laundry process, don’t be afraid to ask someone, or Google, for help. The more you know before doing your laundry the less risk you have of potentially ruining your clothes during the laundry process. 

Leave it to the professionals 

If you are still unsure about how to tackle your laundry, leave it to the professionals. At Laundryheap we have a multitude of laundry services for you to choose from. Whether you want your clothes washed and ironed, or if you want the full dry-cleaning service, we’ve got you covered. Simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to book your service now. 

We are fully operational in London, Birmingham, Manchester, Coventry, Amsterdam, Doha, Kuwait City, Dublin, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah, Singapore, Boston, New York City, Manama, and, most recently, Rotterdam, and The Hague.