Laundryheap Blog – Laundry & Dry Cleaning

Same-day collection. Free delivery in 24 hours.


Leave a comment

How to remove henna stains

If you’ve been left with a henna stain on your favourite outfit, this is how you remove it. 

  • What is henna?
  • Removing henna stains 
  • Laundryheap

What is henna?

Henna is a form of body art that originates from Ancient India. Decorative designs are painted onto the body using a plant-based dye, and it usually lasts for 2 weeks. In India, henna is associated with positive spirits and good luck. The night before an Indian wedding, the bride will take part in a Mehndi ceremony, where she will have her henna painted as a way to wish her good health and prosperity during her marriage. 

Removing henna stains 

If you get a henna stain on your clothing you must treat it as quickly as possible. It’s best to treat your stain immediately to prevent it from drying into the fabric of your clothing.

To remove a henna stain from your clothing you will need:

  • A cloth or paper towel
  • Laundry detergent 
  • A clean toothbrush
  • Cold water
  • Distilled white vinegar OR rubbing alcohol

To begin removing your henna stain, use a clean, absorbent, cloth, or paper towel, and blot the stained area. It is important that you do not rub the stain as this will only make it bigger. Instead, press your cloth, or paper towel, on top of the stain and allow your cloth to absorb the excess dye. Each time you blot the stain use a fresh section of the cloth to prevent the stain from spreading. 

After you have removed as much of the excess dye as possible, put a few drops of laundry detergent onto the stain, and use a clean toothbrush to scrub the detergent into the fabric. Continue scrubbing until you can no longer see the stain. Although it is important to be vigorous with your scrubbing in order to lift the stain, do be careful to not be overly harsh as this can result in your fabric becoming damaged. 

Once you can no longer see the stain, use cold water to rinse away the remaining detergent and dye. It is important that you use cold water rather than hot because hot water could set the stain. Keep rinsing your fabric until all of the detergent and dye has been removed. 

If you can still see your henna stain after rinsing the fabric, pour a small amount of distilled white vinegar or rubbing alcohol onto it. Let the fabric soak up the solution for an hour, before washing your item as you normally would. 

Should your clothing still be stained, repeat the process again. 

Laundryheap  

If you have a henna stain on your clothing, and are concerned about treating it yourself, send it to Laundryheap. We provide an abundance of services, from general washing to dry-cleaning, to fit all of your laundry needs. If your clothing is stained, simply write us a note in the order instructions explaining what item the stain is on, where, and what the stain is, and we will take every precaution possible to remove the stain for you. 

We are currently operating, contaclessly, in London, Manchester, Birmingham, Coventry, Dubai, Sharjah, Abu Dhab, Amsterdam, Haarlem, Rotterdam, The Hague, Copenhagen, Dublin, Doha, New York, Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Jose, Washington DC, Chicago, Kuwait City, Manama, and Singapore

To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


Leave a comment

How to care for knitwear

Photo by Pavel Danilyuk from Pexels

As we race towards winter, our wardrobes are becoming filled with knitwear in all styles, colours, and materials. To maintain the quality of our knitwear, it is essential to understand how to properly care for it. 

  • General knitwear care 
  • Cashmere 
  • Merino wool
  • Lambswool

General knitwear care 

Before delving into how to care for specific types of knitwear, here are 5 general knitwear care tips. 

  • Be aware of how you store your knitwear. Before hanging all of your knitwear in your wardrobe, be mindful of its material and evaluate whether hanging is the best option. For example, you should never hang wool or cashmere as this will result in the fabric stretching, and your garment becoming misshapen. 
  • Shave away the bobbles. Bobbling occurs when two pieces of fabric rub together for an extended period of time, and can also occur when washing. To maintain the quality of your knitwear, regularly shave away any bobbles using an electronic bobble remover or an electric razor. 
  • Brush regularly.  You should be brushing your knitwear regularly with a soft clothes brush. This will remove any lint and hairs lingering on your clothing.
  • Rotate. Make sure that you are rotating your knitwear regularly. If you wear certain items excessively without giving them time to re-shape themselves, your garments will end up losing their shape forever. 
  • Invest in cedar balls. Moths love to nibble away at knitwear. To keep the moths at bay, store your clothing with cedar balls.

Cashmere 

Cashmere is an extremely soft, luxurious, and delicate fabric, which is made from the hair of Kashmir goats. Only a limited amount of cashmere is harvested each year, which is why it is considered a luxury fabric that must be taken care of when washing

Machine washing 

Despite some washing machines having a special knitwear/wool cycle, NEVER wash cashmere in the washing machine. The material is much too delicate and your clothing will end up misshapen and damaged. 

Hand washing 

To hand-wash your cashmere, mix a basin of warm water with a gentle detergent. To be extra precautious, you can buy cashmere specific laundry detergent. Submerge your garment in the water and soak for 10-15 minutes. After this time, carefully rinse the detergent from your item using warm water. Once you are satisfied that all of the detergent has been washed out, remove your clothing from the water and press out or squeeze as much excess water out as you can. Do not wring out your item as this will cause unnecessary damage. 

Drying cashmere  

To dry your cashmere, do not put it in the tumble dryer as this will cause it to become misshaped and can result in irreparable damage. Instead, lay out a clean, dry, towel and place your knitwear, flat, on top of it. Keep it away from direct sunlight, and leave it to completely air dry. 

wool fashion

Merino wool 

Merino wool is a type of sheep’s wool. It is known for being extremely soft and naturally resident to odours. 

Machine washing 

Sheep’s wool, in general, is strong and has a great deal of elasticity. This makes it acceptable to put in the washing machine without damage being caused. Of course, before putting your item in the washing machine, always check the care label for specific washing instructions. 

To machine wash your merino wool, always use a gentle, or wool and knit, cycle at 30 degrees. Any other temperature or cycle could shrink your clothing. For detergent, it’s best to use a milder option with a neutral PH.

Hand washing 

To hand wash merino wool, begin by filling a basin with warm water and a mild detergent. Submerge your knitwear in the mixture, and leave it to soak for around 5 minutes. After 5 minutes, carefully rinse your garment in warm water. Once you’ve rinsed your item, squeeze as much of the water from it as you can without wringing or twisting the clothing.

Drying merino wool 

To dry your merino wool wrap it in a clean, dry, towel, and gently squeeze your garment to remove as much water as possible. Unwrap your clothing from the towel, and lay it flat on a fresh dry towel. Leave it to air dry in a cool location. 

Image by Breibeest

Lambs wool 

Lambs wool is taken from a sheep at their first shearing and is naturally soft, smooth, and elastic. It is the highest quality sheep’s wool you can find. 

Machine washing 

Even on a gentle cycle, lambs wool is far too delicate to machine wash.

Hand washing 

To hand wash lambs wool, mix a mild detergent, with a PH level below 7, with cool water. If you need hot water to dissolve your detergent, you must leave the water to cool before you submerge your knitwear. After submerging your item in the water, swirl gently, remembering not to twist or wring the garment as this will result in it losing its shape. 

Drying lambs wool 

Never put lambs wool in the tumble dryer. This will result in your knitwear becoming misshapen and, potentially irreplaceably, damaged. Instead, once you are satisfied with the cleanliness of your garment, remove it from the water and place it on a dry, clean, towel. Make sure to stretch your item out to its original shape, before leaving it to air dry. 

Photo by Alex Smith from Pexels

If you want to ensure that your knitwear is adequately cared for when being washed, then leave it with us. We will pick up, dry clean, and re-deliver your knitwear to you, completely contactless. 

To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


1 Comment

How to wash your bathrobe

Photo by Samantha Passuello from Pexels

As we move closer to the end of the year the weather is becoming increasingly colder. Luckily, a bathrobe will protect you from those cold winter days. To maintain the quality of your robe, it is imperative that you launder it properly. 

  • Why do you need to wash your bathrobe?
  • Cotton bathrobe
  • Fleece bathrobe
  • Silk or Satin bathrobe

Why do you need to wash your bathrobe?

As the winter days go on you will wear your bathrobe more often. Ideally, it should be washed after every 3-4 wears, even if there is nothing directly spilt onto it. If you wait for more than 4 wears you increase the risk of mould and bacteria growing on your robe.

The way that you wash your bathrobe depends heavily on what material it is made of. If you are constantly wearing your robe, you will find yourself washing it more frequently. To prevent the fibres becoming damaged, you need to make sure that you are adequately caring for it whilst it is in the wash. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Cotton bathrobe 

Cotton is a durable material so you can wash your cotton bathrobe with other clothing if you want.

Wash your robe at 60 degrees, using half the amount of detergent you would use in a regular wash. Once your 60 degree wash is finished, add half a cup of distilled vinegar to the load and set to a rinse cycle. This will clear away any lingering detergent residue.

To ensure that your bathrobe remains soft and fluffy, dry it in the tumble dryer on a low heat setting. 

Fleece bathrobe 

Fleece is a more delicate material and should never be washed on a hot wash as this can damage its fibres.

Before putting your fleece bathrobe in the washing machine turn it inside out to prevent pilling. You should also avoid washing fleece with other materials as lint will easily transfer onto the material and be increasingly hard to remove.

It’s best to use a cold water cycle and liquid laundry detergent to wash your fleece bathrobe. Avoid using fabric softener in your wash as this can damage the fibres.

Once your wash is finished, dry your robe, ideally in direct sunlight, or using the lowest heat setting on your tumble dryer. 

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

Silk or satin bathrobe

Silk and satin are incredibly delicate fabrics, so it is always best to hand wash these items. 

To hand wash your silk or satin robe, begin by filling a basin with lukewarm water, enough to submerge your robe in. Once your basin is full, add a few drops of delicate detergent and stir it into the water. Submerge your robe in the water and leave it to soak for 3-5 minutes. After 3-5 minutes, use your hand to plunge your robe up and down in the water to remove any dirt. Once your robe is sufficiently cleaned, remove it from the water and rinse it off with cool water.

Initially dry your robe with a clean, dry, towel, before hanging it up to dry, ideally in direct sunlight. 

If you wish to wash your robe in the washing machine, always use a delicate wash cycle and delicate laundry detergent to avoid any damage. 

Photo by Ekaterina Bolovtsova from Pexels

The best way to care for your bathrobe is to get it dry cleaned. Book your Laundryheap dry cleaning service by heading to the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


1 Comment

How to wash a bath mat

When it comes to doing laundry it’s important not to forget the household items that need to be regularly cleaned. This is how to wash your bath mat.

  • Why wash your bath mat?
  • How often should you wash your mat?
  • Using the washing machine 
  • Hand washing 
  • Leave it to the experts

Why wash your bath mat?

Bathrooms are the perfect environment for mold and bacteria. They are damp and humid, providing a ripe environment for mold to grow on every surface, including your bath mat. In addition to mold, bath mats can become slippy with oil buildup from spilled shower products. Regularly washing your bath mat will prevent these hazards.

 How often should you wash your mat?

Washing your bath mat largely depends on how many people use your bathroom and how often. This being said, as a rule of thumb, it is best to wash your bath mat at least once a week to prevent a build-up of bacteria and oil. 

Using the washing machine

The easiest way to wash your bath mat is by putting it in the washing machine. That being said, it is best to check the care label as it may be hand wash only. 

After checking your bath mats care label, take it outside and give it a good shake to remove any loose dirt. Shaking your mat out will also allow you to better see if there are any stains on your mat that need to be pre-treated. 

Once you have shaken out your mat, pre-treat any stains that you can see. You can use a standard stain remover or a natural stain remover, such as hydrogen peroxide. 

Next, put your bath mat in the washing machine as normal. It’s best to use a warm setting for your wash as you want to successfully get rid of any lingering bacteria. It is also best to wash your mat on its own as this will ensure it has optimal space in your washing machine and will guarantee a successful clean. 

When your wash is complete, dry your mat completely before putting it back in your bathroom. The best way to dry your mat is in the fresh air, however, if the weather does not permit this, you can use a low setting on your tumble dryer, or use a drying rack. If you are using a drying rack, make sure that there is ample ventilation to prevent musty smells and damp. 

Hand washing 

If you would prefer to not use your washing machine you can hand wash

Similarly to when using the washing machine, before you begin hand washing your mat shake it out to remove any loose dirt. 

To hand-wash your bath mat you will need to prepare a diluted bleach solution. It is best to do this in a bath or shallow sink so that you have plenty of room. Before preparing your bleach solution make sure that you are wearing gloves to protect your hands from coming into direct contact with the bleach. You must also ensure that your room is well ventilated to prevent the toxic fumes from the bleach causing you any harm. 

Begin preparing your bleach solution by adding one gallon of cold water to your bath or sink. For every one gallon of cold water that you add you can add one teaspoon of bleach. Depending on how long it has been since your bath mats last clean depends on how much bleach you decide to use. 

Once the diluted bleach solution has been made, place your bath mat in the solution and leave it to soak for three to four hours. 

After three to four hours, remove your bath mat and leave it to dry under the same instructions as when using a washing machine.

Finally, drain and rinse the bath/sink and clean away the dirt left behind from your bath mat.

Leave it to the experts 

If your bath mat is proving particularly difficult to clean, or you just don’t want to clean it yourself, leave it to us. We will pick up, professionally dry clean, and re-deliver your bath mat to you all within 24 hours. To book your dry cleaning service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 

We are now available in Los Angeles.


Leave a comment

How to rid your clothing of pet hair

We all love our pets, but what we don’t love is their hair covering our clothing. Getting rid of pet hair is not as simple as putting your clothing in the washing machine. If you were to do that, the hair would clump together and clog your washing machines drainage pipe. This could result in your washing machine breaking.

Rather than risk breaking your washing machine, here are some pre-treatment methods to rid your clothing of pet hair. 

  • A lint roller
  • Sticky tape 
  • Rubber gloves
  • A sponge
  • Tumble dryer

A lint roller 

A lint roller is one-sided adhesive paper wrapped around a barrel with a handle attached for easy use. They are incredibly handy when it comes to removing pet hair. Simply roll it over your hairy item of clothing and observe as the adhesive paper picks up the pet hair. If you notice the paper becoming clogged with pet hair, simply remove the top layer of adhesive paper and there will be another layer ready to use underneath. 

Image by Laurie ChippsFo

Sticky tape 

If you don’t have a lint roller available, sticky tape can be just as effective. Simply tear off a strip of tape and lay it over your item of clothing. As you pull the tape from your clothing the pet hairs will come away with it. Repeat this process all over your garment until it is pet hair-free. Depending on the size of your clothing, and how hairy it is, you may need several strips of tape to complete the dehairing process.

Image by Marco Verch Professional Photographer and Speaker

Rubber gloves

An ordinary pair of rubber gloves are handy for washing the dishes and removing pet hair. Begin by laying your garment on a flat surface. Next, put on your rubber gloves and rub your clothing item. The movement will create friction between the fabric and the gloves, resulting in the pet hairs becoming loose and forming piles. These piles of hair are a lot easier to pick up and dispose of. Once the bigger clumps of pet hair have been disposed of, slightly wet your rubber gloves and repeat the process of rubbing your garment. This will pick up any stray hairs left on your clothes. 

A sponge 

If you are looking for a way to remove pet hairs without getting your clothes wet, use an ordinary kitchen sponge. Firstly, make sure that your sponge is completely clean and dry. Next, lay your clothing on a flat surface. Take your sponge and slowly rub it over the surface of your item. Your pet hairs will stick to the sponge and your clothing will remain dry. This method is best for quickly removing small amounts of pet hair, however, is not as effective if your clothing is completely covered in hair.

Tumble dryer

Using a tumble dryer is the best way to remove pet hair from multiple items of clothing. Put your items in the dryer and use a 10 minute, no heat, dryer cycle. This will soften the fibres in your clothing and loosen the pet hairs. Unlike a washing machine, your tumble dryer comes with a lint trap that will catch the pet hairs and prevent damage to your machine. Once the cycle has been completed, remove each item of clothing and give it a shake to remove stray hairs. If your clothes need washed, put them in the washing machine and add ½ a cup of white vinegar to the cycle to keep the clothes loose and remove deep-set pet hairs. 

Image by RaGeBe

Whether your clothing is covered in pet-hair, stained, or just needs to be laundered, Laundryheap is here to help. Book your slot by visiting the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app. We are now operating in NYC, Kuwait, and Bahrain


1 Comment

How to make a DIY face covering

Photo by Engin Akyurt from Pexels

With the world slowly beginning to emerge from COVID19 lockdown, it is essential that we continue to keep ourselves and those around us safe. One was of achieving safety is by making and wearing a face covering.

  • Why should you wear a face covering? 
  • When should you wear a face covering?
  • How to make a face covering from a T-shirt
  • How to make a face covering from a bandanna 
  • How to sew a face covering 
  • How to look after your face covering

Why should you wear a face covering?

Despite the fact that many countries are beginning to ease their lockdown restrictions, Coronavirus has not disappeared. We still need to make sure that we are staying safe. Wearing a face covering helps reduce the risk of transmitting COVID19 when we do leave the house for essential reasons. Additionally, they will protect those who are asymptomatic from spreading Coronavirus unwittingly.

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

When should you wear a face covering?

Face coverings should be worn on public transport, in shops, and in enclosed spaces where social distancing can not be carried out and you are amongst people who are not living in your home. 

Before putting your face covering on you should wash your hands or use hand sanitiser to rid yourself of any bacteria. Once your hands are clean, place your face covering comfortably over your nose and mouth, making sure that you can still breathe.

Please note, face coverings should not be worn by children under the age of 2 or by those with respiratory problems.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

How to make a face covering from a T-shirt 

You will need:

  • An old T-shirt that you no longer want 
  • A ruler 
  • A pair of scissors 
  1. Begin by laying your T-shirt on a flat surface. Using your ruler, measure 20 cm from the bottom of the T-shirt. From your 20 cm mark, use your scissors and cut a straight line across the width of your material, creating a rectangle. 
  2. Using your ruler again, measure 2 cm from the top right corner of your fabric. From the 2 cm mark, make a 15 cm horizontal cut through your T-shirt that is parallel to the top of the rectangle. Repeat this process, parallel to the cut that you have just made. 
  3. To make your ties, cut open the two long strips of fabric that you have just created. Unfold the main piece of fabric and place it over your nose and mouth, making sure that you can still breathe. Tie the top two ties around your head, and the bottom ties around your neck. You must make sure that your ties are secure and will not become unfastened. 
Photo by Quinten Van Kerrebroeck from Pexels

How to make a face covering from a bandanna 

You will need:

  • A bandanna of at least 50 cm by 50 cm 
  • Two elastic bands or hair ties 
  1. Begin by laying your bandanna on a flat surface. Fold your bandanna in half from top to bottom. 
  2. Next, fold the top half of your bandanna two-thirds of the way down and fold the bottom half up so that the two sections meet in the middle. 
  3. Thread your elastic bands or hair ties through the bandanna, keeping them 12 cm apart. 
  4. Finally, fold the overhanging ends of the bandanna into the centre and tuck them into your elastic bands or hair ties. 
Image by Alexander Droeger from Pixabay

How to sew a face covering 

You will need:

  • Two 25 cm by 25 cm squares of cotton fabric 
  • Two 20 cm pieces of elastic or string 
  • A needle
  • Thread
  • A pair of scissors 
  1. Begin by placing your two 25 cm by 25 cm squares of fabric on top of one another. Fold one side of the stacked fabric over by 0.75 cm and hem the material. Repeat this process on the opposite side of the fabric. 
  2. Create two channels by folding over the stacked fabric by 1.5 cm on each side. Stick down both sides of the fabric, making sure that the stitches are strong enough to hold the material together. 
  3. With your needle, run your 20 cm of elastic or string through the hem of your covering to create ear loops. Repeat this process on the opposite side of the covering, making sure that you tie the ends tightly.
  4. To finish, gently pull your elastic or string so that your tied knots are tucked inside the hem. Gather the sides of the fabric on the elastic and adjust them so that they comfortably fits your face. Securely stitch your elastic in place to ensure that your face covering will not fall below your nose and mouth. 
Image by Anke Sundermeier from Pixabay

How to look after your face covering 

It is not enough to just wear a face covering, you also have to regularly clean it. When taking your face covering off do not touch the front of it or the section that has been touching your nose and mouth. Instead, remove your covering using the ties around your head. Once removed, immediately place it in a plastic bag until you are able to wash it. If your covering has touched any surface, you must disinfect those surfaces immediately. To best ensure that your face covering is rid of bacteria, wash it in your washing machine after every use on a hot wash.

If your face covering has been hand-stitched it may be better to hand wash to avoid it potentially falling apart in the washing machine. If you are hand-washing, lather the fabric in laundry detergent and scrub it for at least 20 seconds. Rinse with warm to hot water, and either leave to dry or use the hottest setting on your tumble dryer.  Once dried, iron your face covering. The heat from the iron will kill any residing bacteria and reduce your risk of contracting a bacterial respiratory infection.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

We want to ensure that our drivers and customers remain safe during COVID19. That is why we now deliver your laundry contactless. To book your delivery slot head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


Leave a comment

How to remove ink stains

Ink stains are a potential outfit ruiner. Whether you’ve accidentally ran a ball-point pen over the sleeve of your best white shirt, or your children have decided to give your favourite skirt a new design, ink stains can be incredibly difficult to remove. Try these methods for removing them.

  • Cover in Salt
  • Apply liquid laundry detergent 
  • Blot with rubbing alcohol 
  • Spray with hairspray 
  • Soak in milk
  • Spread over with vinegar and corn starch

Cover in salt 

If you catch your ink stain before it has dried you are incredibly lucky because they are easier to remove than dried stains. To remove fresh ink stains, cover the stain in salt and dab gently with a wet paper towel. Brush off the salt and check to see if the stain has been removed. If the stain hasn’t been removed, repeat the process, or try an additional method explained in this post.

Apply liquid laundry detergent 

For a dried, water-based, ink stain a liquid laundry detergent is best to use. Begin by laying your stained item of clothing on a clean towel. Apply water to the stain and blot with a clean cloth. As you blot you should begin to see the ink transferring from your stained clothing onto the cloth. Once no more ink is being transferred onto the cloth, apply a small amount of liquid laundry detergent on what’s left of the ink stain. Leave it to soak in for three to five minutes. After three to five minutes, wash your clothing on the hottest setting advised on the care label. Before drying, check that the stain has been completely removed and, if not, complete the process again. 

Blot with rubbing alcohol 

Before beginning with this method you need to check that your clothing won’t be stained further by the rubbing alcohol. To do this, dab some rubbing alcohol onto the seam of your garment and wait to observe if a reaction occurs. If nothing happens, you are safe to begin.

Firstly, lay your stained item of clothing on top of a clean towel. Using a clean cloth blot your ink stain with rubbing alcohol, this will begin diluting the stain. Be aware that the towel underneath your garment may become wet with rubbing alcohol and stained with transferred ink. If this happens, replace the wet and stained towel with a fresh one to ensure that no ink is re-transferred on to your clothing. Continue dabbing your stain with rubbing alcohol until no ink is transferred onto the cloth. Once you’ve reached this point, wash off any rubbing alcohol residue. 

If you are treating a ball-point pen stain, rub a small amount of liquid laundry detergent on to the stain and leave it for three to five minutes. Wash off the detergent and observe whether the stain has been removed. 

Before moving forwards, observe whether the blotting and liquid detergent has been successful in removing the ink stain. If so, wash your garment on the hottest wash suggested on your clothing items care label. If the stain has not been successfully removed, mix a solution of oxygen-based bleach and cool water. Completely submerge your clothing in the solution and leave it to soak for 8 hours. If your stain has still not been removed, make a new solution, and leave your clothing for another 8 hours. This should remove the stain, and leave your clothing ink free.

Spray with hairspray 

Most hairsprays contain alcohol which is incredibly useful when dissolving ink and removing ink stains. The higher the alcohol content in the hairspray, the more effective it will be in removing the stain- often the cheaper hairsprays have the highest alcohol content.

Lay your stained garment on a clean towel, and thoroughly spray the stain. Blot the stain with a clean cloth until the stain has been removed. Once removed, wash your clothing according to the advice on your garments care label. If the stain has not been removed, repeat the process.

Image by Andrew Magill

Soak in milk

If you have time for a more time-consuming ink stain removal method this could be the solution for you. Fill a bowl with enough milk to completely submerge your ink stain. Place your stained clothing in the milk and leave it overnight to soak. Remove your clothing in the morning and observe whether the stain has been removed. If your stain has been removed, wash your garment as normal. If your stain has not been removed, repeat the process, or perhaps try one of the other methods suggested in this post.

Spread over with vinegar and cornstarch 

Begin this process by laying your damaged item on a clean towel and soaking your stain with vinegar. Whilst the vinegar begins breaking down the ink, mix two parts vinegar with three parts cornstarch until a paste has formed. Once you have reached paste consistency, spread it over the ink stain and leave it to completely dry. Once your paste has dried, wash your item as you normally would. 

If these methods aren’t successful in removing your ink stain, leave it to us to remove. Book your slot by visiting the Laundryheap website or by downloading the Laundryheap app.  


Leave a comment

How to make hand sanitiser

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

As COVID 19 continues to affect our lives, we must do everything to stay safe. Hand sanitiser is perfect for fighting germs whilst travelling, however, is becoming increasingly difficult to buy. Try making your own hand sanitiser using this simple recipe. 

  • Warning 
  • Prep
  • What you’ll need
  • The recipe 
  • How to use it

Warning 

Please bear in mind that using hand sanitiser should not be a replacement for washing your hands. The most effective way to kill bacteria is to wash your hands using soap and water. Hand sanitiser should only be used when you are on the go, or if soap and water is not readily available to you. 

You should also be aware that your homemade sanitiser may not be as effective as a store-bought one. This is because the tools you use will not be effectively sterilised, nor will the environment that you produce the sanitiser in. It is always best to use a store-bought sanitiser for the most effective protection from bacteria so only make your own if there are no alternative options. 

Before making your own hand sanitiser, be wary about adding essential oils as they can cause skin irritation. Make sure that you are aware of how your skin will react to whatever essential oils you may add prior to their use. 

Prep 

Before making your hand sanitiser make sure you clean your work station using diluted bleach. You also want to ensure that you thoroughly wash and sanitise the equipment you will be using. This needs to be done to ensure that any bacteria in your environment is eliminated to the best of your ability and therefore will be less likely to transfer into your mixture. 

You will need to use rubbing alcohol in your hand sanitiser mixture. Prior to creating your mixture, you need to ensure that your alcohol is not diluted. Undiluted alcohol will have a higher success rate of killing bacteria. 

Finally, make sure that you wash your hands thoroughly before beginning the process. Similarly to sterilising your environment and equipment, you need to ensure that any bacteria are eliminated, including bacteria that you may be carrying on your hands. 

What you’ll need 

To make your hand sanitiser you will need:

  • ¾ of a cup of rubbing alcohol (99% alcohol volume)
  • ¼ of a cup of aloe vera gel
  • 10 drops of any essential oil you want to include- if you don’t have any essential oils add lemon juice 
  • An empty bottle for your mixture

The recipe 

The key to making an effective hand sanitiser is to keep the ingredients at a 2:1 ratio of alcohol to aloe vera. This keeps the alcohol level of your sanitiser around 60%, which is the minimum amount that is needed to kill bacteria. 

To begin with, pour all of your ingredients into a bowl and mix together with a spoon. Once your mixture has bound together, whisk it into a gel consistency. When your mixture has reached gel consistency, pour it into an empty bottle, ready for use.

How to use

To effectively use your hand sanitiser, apply a small amount to the palm of one of your hands. Thoroughly rub your hands together making sure to spread the gel over the entirety of your hand, including your fingers. Carry on rubbing the gel into your hands until it is completely dry, this should take between 30 and 60 seconds. Note, it will take at least 60 seconds from application for the hand sanitiser to begin killing bacteria. 

We want to ensure that you stay safe during Covid 19 and make sure that we are taking the necessary precautions to prevent the spread of coronavirus. That is why we now offer hot washes to kill bacteria, and contactless services to avoid our customers coming into contact with our drivers. Book your slot by visiting the Laundryheap website or by downloading the Laundryheap app.