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Interesting Facts About Singapore

Singapore is a gorgeous country and if you are planning to visit it, it will no doubt leave you with many unforgettable memories. However, before travelling to the country, it is a good idea to learn more about it. Here are some interesting facts about Singapore!

Singapore City!

1. National Anthem of Singapore

National anthems are always sung with pride and passion but one of the interesting facts about Singapore is that the national anthem is printed on the back of a $1000 bill in very small text. Whenever you exchange your currency, you could have the Singaporean national anthem in your wallet!

2. Singapore Celebrates National Tree Planting Day

In 1971, Singapore started an annual event called ‘National Tree Planting Day’ to help the environment more. What makes this one of the more interesting facts about Singapore is that trees are planted in public places like parks and schools and some people even adopt trees as birthday presents.

3. The First-Ever Gardening-Themed, HortPark, is in Singapore

Furthermore, not only does Singapore make efforts to plant trees but they take pride in encouraging people to garden more. HortPark has become one of Asia’s most must-visit attractions because it’s the first-ever park that is devoted to gardening.

4. Singapore Has Fast Walkers!

This is certainly one of the most interesting facts about Singapore. Pedestrians in the country walk so fast that statistically, they have an average walking speed of 6.15 km/h per hour! If you’re with a Singaporean tour guide, make sure to keep up with them and walk fast!

5. The Annual Food Festival is in July

Singapore is known for its landscapes, buildings, and weather but it is also home to delicious food! If you love food the same way we love laundry, we advise you to visit Singapore in July because that’s when the annual Singapore food festival is held.

6. Laundryheap Provides Services in Singapore

There are many interesting facts about Singapore and on-demand laundry service being available in the country is one of them!

Singapore is a beautiful country that needs to be explored without any laundry chores. If you do happen to have dirty clothes with you while in Singapore, let Laundryheap take care of it! That’s right, we’ll do your laundry for you and deliver it back to you within 24 hours.

One of the Interesting facts about Singapore are that there is a laundry service!

Singapore is a gorgeous country that should be on all traveller’s bucket lists. Now that you know some interesting facts about Singapore, you’ll want to visit it even more!

For more information about Laundryheap, visit our website or download the free Laundryheap app on iOS or Android!


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Fun facts about Dallas 

Photo by Ryan from Pexels

Dallas, colloquially referred to as ‘Big D’, is located in the North of Texas. Here are just 10 fun facts about the US city. 

  • Population
  • Visitors 
  • Big Tex
  • Frozen margaritas
  • 7-eleven 
  • German chocolate cake 
  • Popcorn
  • Cake 
  • Famous faces
  • Art

Population 

Dallas is home to 1,281,047 people, making it the 3rd largest city in Texas and the 9th largest city in the US. 

Photo by Talena Reese from Pexels

Visitors 

On average 24.9 million people visit Dallas each year. The JFK Museum, Botanical Gardens, and Reunion Tower are just some of the attractions that tourists travel to see.

Photo by Irbin Medina from Pexels

Big Tex

Big Tex is a 52-foot tall statue that welcomes visitors to the annual state fair of Texas, which is held at Fair Park in Dallas every year. Not only is Big Tex a cultural icon of both Dallas and Texas, but he is also the tallest cowboy in the whole of Texas. 

Image by David Grant

Frozen margaritas 

The only way to improve on the perfection that is a cocktail is to freeze it. Although we don’t know who invented frozen margaritas, we do know that Mariano Martinez was the genius behind the frozen margarita machine. In 1971 Mariano Martinez was receiving complaints from customers at his restaurant in Dallas because bartenders weren’t accurately measuring the quantities of their frozen margaritas due to their high demand. Cleverly, Martinez figured out that an automatic mixer could both produce the perfectly mixed frozen margarita and ease the load on his bartenders. Thus, he began using a soft-serve ice cream machine to generate his frozen margaritas, and the frozen margarita machine was born. 

Image by Missvain

7-eleven 

We’ve all heard of, and probably visited, 7-eleven, America’s popular convenience store. But, did you know that 7-eleven was founded in Dallas, where its headquarters remain? The chain was founded in 1927 as an ice house storefront in Dallas. Then named Tote’m Stores, they sold ice as well as basic essentials such as bread and eggs. The name 7-eleven wasn’t used until 1946 when the name changed to reflect the store’s new opening hours- 7 am to 11 pm.  

Photo by mingche lee from Pexels

German chocolate cake 

Contrary to the name, German chocolate cake does not originate from Germany, but Dallas. In 1852 an English American baker named Samuel German created a dark baking chocolate with more sugar than the average semi-sweet baking chocolate. 105 years later, the Dallas Morning News published a cake recipe by Mrs. George Clay called German’s Chocolate Cake, because it used Samuel German’s specific baking chocolate. As the recipe was distributed, the apostrophe was dropped and the name altered to German Chocolate Cake as we know it today. 

Image by Kimberly Vardeman

Popcorn 

According to Fortune magazine more popcorn is consumed in the Dallas-Fort Worth area than any other. Historian and columnist for the Dallas Morning News, A.C Greene, believes that this is because many people in Dallas still visit the movies to see the latest blockbusters. Naturally, popcorn and movies go hand in hand, thus explaining the high demand for it in the Dallas area. 

Photo by Pavel Danilyuk from Pexels

Cake

Another fun Dallas cake fact is that there is a slice of cake from the 1913 wedding of President Woodrow Wilson’s daughter, Jessie, in Woodrow Wilson High School. The cake was sent from one of Jessie’s bridesmaids in Texas to her cousin in Dallas. In 1927, the cake was laid in one of the cornerstones of the school

Photo by Rene Asmussen from Pexels

Famous faces 

Dallas was the birthplace of some of the world’s most famous faces. Included in that list are Owen Wilson, Usher, Selena Gomez, and Kelly Clarkson. 

Image by Eva Rinaldi

Art

At 68 acres, The Dallas Arts District is the largest urban arts district in the US. It is home to facilities for visual, performing, and developing arts including the Meyerson Symphony Centre, Winspear Opera House, and Dallas Museum of Art. It is in the arts district that you can find a wide variety of art spanning from ancient times to the present. 

Image by Dallasborn&bred

The best thing about Dallas is that Laundryheap operates in the city. Book your Laundryheap order today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Rotterdam fun facts

Rotterdam is the second largest city in the Netherlands, made famous for its modern architecture. Quirky architecture is not the only interesting thing about Rotterdam though. 

  • The flag of Rotterdam
  • Rotterdam’s motto
  • An old city
  • Netherlands skyline
  • Spy centre
  • Europort
  • Eco station
  • Dr
  • Expats
  • The Witte Huis 

The flag of Rotterdam 

The colours of Rotterdam have been green and white since the Middle Ages, but the number of lines on the flag have changed. The current flag, which has been official since 1949, is a green horizontal stripe followed by a white stripe, and a final green stripe. The green represents the Court of Wena, a castle that stood on the former Hofplein Station, and the white symbolises the Rotte river. 

Image by Jeroen Kransen

Rotterdam’s motto  

Rotterdam’s motto is ‘sterker door strijd’, which translates to ‘stronger through battle’. It was adopted after the second world war by Queen Wilhelmina as a testament to the courage and bravery of Rotterdammers during the second world war. You can see the motto underneath the coat of arms of Rotterdam. 

Image by Le contributeur wikicommons Arch.

An old city 

Looking around Rotterdam, admiring it’s modern architecture, you would believe that it was a fairly new city. In fact, Rotterdam gained its city rights in 1340. Unfortunately, the city was heavily bombed during the second world war, and so most of it had to be rebuilt, forming the city we know today. 

Image by Clemens Lettinck from Pixabay

Netherlands skyline  

Rotterdam is the only city in the Netherlands with a skyline. Made from 352 high-rise buildings, the Rotterdam skyline is often referred to as ‘the Manhattan on the Maas’ because most of the buildings are situated on the river Maas and new high rises are constantly being built. The tallest building in Rotterdam, and the Netherlands, is the Maastoren, which is 165 meters tall. 

Image by Rob Oo

Spy centre  

During the first world war, Rotterdam became the biggest spy centre in the world for both Germany and Britain. This was because the Netherlands, and therefore Rotterdam, was a neutral country and was also placed perfectly in between Germany and Britain. Rotterdam was particularly popular because it had excellent ferry and railway connections with Britain, Germany, and Belgium.

Image by Markus Christ from Pixabay 

Europort 

Rotterdam’s harbour, Europort, is the biggest port in Europe, 10th biggest port in the world, and the 11th biggest container port in the world. It is considered one of the busiest ports in the world and a major entry point into Europe

Image by Rik Schuiling / TropCrop-TCS

Eco station

Rotterdam Central Station is the main station in Rotterdam. It’s roof is formed from 28,000 square meters of glass plates and 10,000 square meters of stainless steel. 10,000 meters of the glass contain 136,000 solar cells, which supplies 8% of the daily electricity the train station uses. 

Image by Rudy and Peter Skitterians from Pixabay

Dr

In the Scheepsvaart area of Rotterdam is a secret club called Dr. Known as one of the best cocktail bars in Rotterdam, you can only enter the bar if you have a patient number that you are given when you pre-book. As the name suggests, the bar is doctor themed, but once inside you are not allowed to take photos, use your phone, or talk about the bar. The air of mystery is what has helped maintain the hype and mystery of the cocktail bar since its opening in 2012. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Expats

Only, roughly, 50% of the people living in Rotterdam are Dutch. The city attracts a large number of expats, mostly due to its renowned universities, and, as such, is hugely multicultural. It now has its own Chinatown, an abundance of restaurants catering to world cuisines, and festivals to celebrate its ever growing multiculturalism. 

The Witte Huis 

The Witte Huis, or the White House, was the first skyscraper in Rotterdam. Built between 1897 and 1898 by architect Willem Molenbroek, the building is 11 stories high. There were many people who were sceptical as to whether the building would be supported by the soil. It was one of the only buildings in Rotterdam city centre that survived the big bombardment in 1940. 

Image by MatteoNL97

Reading fun facts about Rotterdam is great, but experiencing them first hand is even better. Whilst you explore Rotterdam, let us sort out your laundry. Book your Laundryheap order by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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Stockholm fun facts

Image by Pedro Szekely

Stockholm is made up of 14 islands that are connected by 57 bridges. It is the capital of Sweden and home to over 975,000 people. But, there is more to Sweden’s capital than just this. 

  • Stockholm’s origins
  • UNESCO World Heritage sites
  • 24-hour sun
  • Swedish meatballs
  • A long and happy life
  • Narrowest street
  • Land of cyclists
  • Gamla Stan
  • The longest art gallery in the world
  • An environmentally conscious city

Stockholm’s origins 

Stockholm was founded by Birger Jarl, who used the city to block off the water passage between Lake Mälaren and the Baltic Sea. The first mention of Stockholm was in 1252, in a letter written by Birger Jarl. Within 100 years, Stockholm became the largest settlement in Sweden. 

Image by Stefan Lins

UNESCO World Heritage sites

Stockholm is home to two UNESCO World Heritage sites- the Royal Palace Drottningholm and The Woodland Cemetery. The Royal Palace is the private residence of the Swedish royal family and a popular tourist attraction. It was added to the UNESCO World Heritage list in 1991. Skogskyrkogården, otherwise known as The Woodland Cemetry, was added to the UNESCO list in 1994 for its groundbreaking design, which has influenced the designs of burial sites around the world. 

Image by denisbin

24 hour sun 

The midnight sun is a natural phenomenon that occurs during the summer months in countries north of the Arctic Circle or south of the Antarctic Circle. In Sweden, this usually occurs during the second half of June, creating endless daylight for weeks at a time. 

Photo by Jonathan Petersson from Pexels

Swedish meatballs

Swedish meatballs are small balls made from a 50-50 ratio of ground pork and ground beef. They are often seasoned with nutmeg, allspice, and white pepper, and served with boiled potatoes and gravy. Shockingly though, Swedish meatballs did not originate in Sweden. In the early 18th century, King Charles XII brought the recipe back to Sweden from his travels in Turkey. 

Image by anokarina

A long and happy life 

Sweden has the 13th highest life expectancy in the world with the average Swede living to 83 years old. This long life expectancy is due to Sweden’s commitment to being environmentally friendly, their healthcare system, which is one of the highest-ranking in the world, and the sense of community found in Sweden. 

Image by Marie Sjödin from Pixabay

Narrowest street

The narrowest street in Stockholm is Mårten Trotzigs alley which, at its slimmest part, is a mere 89 centimeters wide. The alley is named after merchant Mårten Trotzig, who immigrated to Stockholm in 1581, where he became one of the richest merchants in Stockholm. 

Image by Guillaume Capron

Land of cyclists

Over 70 thousand people in Stockholm bike around the city every day. Stockholm is known for its beautiful architecture and luscious green parks, so biking around Stockholm is incredibly peaceful and serene, especially during the spring and summer months. If you choose to ride your bike on the road, there are even dedicated bike lanes to prevent traffic collisions.

Gamla Stan

Gamla Stan is Stockholm’s old town. It dates back to the 13th century and can be defined by its medieval alleyways, cobbled streets, and archaic architecture. Nestled within Gamla Stan you can find the Royal Palace, Stockholm Cathedral, and the Nobel Museum. The towns winning combination of historical buildings and architecture, coupled with its idyllic scenery has transformed Gamla Stan into a popular tourist destination. 

Photo by Katie Evensen from Pexels

The longest art gallery in the world 

Stockholm’s subway system is commonly referred to as the longest art gallery in the world because of the beautiful paintings and mosaics that adorn the walls. 90 of the 100 stations are currently decorated with the work of 150 artists. 

Photo by Jan Židlický from Pexels

An environmentally conscious city

Sweden is an environmental pioneer. It was the first country in the world to pass an environmental protection act and was the host of the first UN conference on the global environment. More than half of the countries national energy supply comes from renewable sources, and by 2045 Sweden wants to become completely fossil-free. Sweden is doing everything it can to save our planet and set an example for countries across the world. 

Photo by Min An from Pexels

Stockholm is an incredibly interesting city, worthy of exploring. It is also just one of the international cities that Laundryheap operates in. To book your Laundryheap Stockholm service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Fun facts about Kuwait City

Photo by Shahbaz Hussain Shah from Pexels

Kuwait City is the capital of the Arab country, the State of Kuwait. It is the third richest country in the Middle East, and home to 4,420,110 people.

  • The name Kuwait City
  • Hot city
  • The Liberation Tower
  • Text savvy 
  • Gigantic banner
  • Not so fast food
  • Soap operas
  • Economy
  • Sports
  • Theatre

The name Kuwait City

The name Kuwait City derives from the Arabic meaning, ‘fortress city built by water.’ The city lies on Kuwait Bay, a natural deep-water harbour, where 90% of Kuwait’s population live. 

Photo by SenuScape from Pexels

Hot city 

In the summer, Kuwait City is one of the hottest cities on earth. The average summer temperature is 45 degrees celsius. The hot desert climate of the city creates prolonged summers and short winters. In addition to the excruciating heat, sand storms frequently occur during the summer months from the Shamal wind. 

The Liberation Tower 

The Liberation Tower, is a 372-meter high telecommunication tower that stands in the middle of Kuwait City. It is the fifth tallest telecommunication tower in the world, the 39th tallest building in the world, and is over 10% taller than the Eiffel Tower. 

Text savvy 

On the 1st of March 2012, the Guinness Book of World Records recognised Kuwait City as the place where the fastest prescribed 160-character text message was sent. 

Photo by Porapak Apichodilok from Pexels

Gigantic banner

The Guinness Book of World Records returned to Kuwait City in 2018, when the record was set for the largest banner to be flown behind a vehicle. The banner measured 4,690 square feet, and was flown behind a vehicle as part of celebrating 100 years since the launch of Chevrolet trucks. 

Not so fast food

When McDonald’s opened in Kuwait City, the drive-through line was, at times, 7 miles long.

Soap operas 

Kuwait soap operas are amongst the most popular in the Arab world. Most of the Gulf soap operas are based in Kuwait and performed using Kuwait dialect. Some of these soap operas are popular in places as far as Tunisia. 

Photo by Nothing Ahead from Pexels

Economy

Kuwait is a petroleum-based economy. Petroleum and fertilizer are Kuwaits main exports. Petroleum accounts for 90% of export revenues and government income in Kuwait. 

Sports 

Kuwait City is home to the Al Kuwait SC, one of Kuwait’s professional basketball teams. The club regularly competes in the Kuwait Division 1 Basketball League, and has provided Kuwait’s national basketball team with some of it’s top players.  

Photo by Markus Spiske from Pexels

Theatre

Kuwait is the only Arab country in the Persian Gulf region that has a theatre tradition. The theatrical movement in Kuwait constitutes a major part of the country’s Arabic cultural life. Kuwait’s theatre tradition began in the 1920’s when the first spoken dramas were released. 

Photo by Monica Silvestre from Pexels

If you are residing in the Kuwait City area, let Laundryheap take care of your laundry for you. Simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to book your service. 


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Fun facts about Abu Dhabi

Photo by Iva Prime from Pexels

Abu Dhabi is the capital of the United Arab  Emirates. When translated from Arabic, Abu Dhabi means, “Father of the Gazelle.” Here are 10 more fun facts about Abu Dhabi. 

  • Designed by a Japanese architect
  • The Yas Marina Circuit 
  • Living on renewable resources
  • The Capital Gate Building
  • Ferrari World 
  • Humpback dolphins
  • The world’s largest desert 
  • And the world’s largest carpet
  • Air-conditioned bus stops 
  • The safest city in the world

Designed by a Japanese architect

Abu Dhabi’s beautifully modern design is down to Japanese architect Katsuhiko Takahashi. In 1967, Sheikh Zayed, who was president at the time, proposed a revamping of the city to modernise it. Katsuhiko Takahashi worked closely with Sheikh Zayed to design the city, and helped spearhead the project, until the Abu Dhabi we see today was built. Initially, the city was only supposed to house 40,000 people. Today, 1.48 million people inhabit the city. 

The Yas Marina Circuit 

The Yas Marina Circuit, where the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix is held, is estimated to have cost AED 3.6 billion to construct. The 5.55 km track covers 21 hectares, has 21 turns, and can be split into 2 separate tracks so that 2 races can be simultaneously hosted. It is hailed as the most technologically advanced circuit in the world. 

Living on renewable resources

Masdar City, a planned city project in Abu Dhabi, will be the world’s first fully sustainable city. Set to be completed in 2030, the city will be powered by renewable energy sources, and be home to 50,000 people. A field of 22-hectares holds 87,777 solar panels, which will provide energy for the city. It will not completely carbon-neutral, which was the original aim, but, it will set an example to all cities across the world. 

The Capital Gate Building 

The Capital Gate Building stands 35 stories high and has over 16,000 square meters of office space. It leans at an 18-degree angle, which makes it the furthest leaning building in the world. It is commonly known as the Leaning Tower of Abu Dhabi, as it leans 14 degrees more than the Leaning Tower of Pissa. 

Ferrari World  

Opened in 2010, Ferrari World is a theme park dedicated to the luxury sports car of the same name. As you walk from ride to ride there are banners that explain how Ferrari started and how the car rose to fame. Each ride at the park is a thrill, and you can expect to encounter every twist, turn, and high speed that you would expect from a Formula One race. The main event is ‘Formula Rossa’. Hailed as the world’s fastest rollercoaster, it covers 2.2 km and reaches speeds of over 240 kmph. It is certainly a ride for thrill-seekers. 

Humpback dolphins

The coastal waters of Abu Dhabi provide favourable conditions for the Indian humpback dolphin. It is estimated that 2,000 humpback dolphins roam the waters of Abu Dhabi, which is the most significant number of these aquatic mammals that can be found anywhere in the world. Asides from Abu Dhabi, you can find the Indian humpback whale in South Africa, Kenya, and Mozambique. 

By Mandy – Dolphin Following Dhow, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=29092883

The world’s largest desert 

Abu Dhabi thrives amongst the world’s largest contiguous desert, known as the Empty Quarter Desert. Spanning over 1,000 km, the terrain is covered by sand dunes of a reddish-orange colour. The daily average temperature of the Empty Quarter Desert is 47 degrees, so the fauna found is limited to arachnids and rodents. 

And the world’s largest carpet 

In the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque, the largest carpet in the world can be found. It spreads roughly 60,570 square feet and weighs 35 tons. Taking over a year to complete, it took the work of over a thousand weavers to create this masterpiece. When the mosque opened, it was not only home to the largest carpet in the world, but also the largest chandelier. Unfortunately, this title has changed, but it still holds the title of the largest chandelier in a mosque. 

Air-conditioned bus stops 

The average temperature in Abu Dhabi is 29.6 degrees, meaning that the city can become incredibly hot and uncomfortable. To combat this, air-conditioned bus stops have begun to pop-up across the city. These bus stops are fitted with air conditioning, seats, and top to bottom see-through glass panes, that help travellers stay cool on their journeys.   

The safest city in the world 

Abu Dhabi was ranked the safest city in the world in 2018, 2019, and 2020. In 2018, they won the title with 86.46 points out of 100. This score was topped the year after when they achieved 88.26 points. In 2020, Abu Dhabi managed to hold onto its title. The ranking is based on user feedback who reported how serious they felt crime was in the city, how safe they feel, and whether they have concerns about being attacked due to discrimination. 

If you are living, working, or traveling around Abu Dhabi, don’t let laundry get in the way. Book a Laundryheap dry cleaning service, and we will sort it for you. 

To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Fun facts about bedding

The average person spends roughly 26 years of their life sleeping, and 7 years of their life trying to fall asleep. Despite being in bed for that long, how much do we really know about our bedding? 

  • Wash your sheets every two weeks
  • Don’t forget to wash your duvet and pillows
  • Thread count
  • Don’t overfill your tumble dryer
  • Organic cotton 
  • Egyptian cotton 
  • Bamboo sheets
  • Spruce up your bedding 
  • Use Laundryheap

Wash your sheets every two weeks 

You should be washing your bed sheets every two weeks, or, if you sweat a lot during the night, every week. For the best care, make sure to always check the care label. You should wash your sheets using the highest possible temperature as this will kill bacteria and get rid of dust mites.

Don’t forget to wash your duvet and pillows  

Although you don’t need to wash them as often as your bedsheets, it is still vital to wash your duvet and pillows. Over time, your duvet and pillows will become loaded with dead skin cells and dust mites. To remove them, you should be washing your duvet and pillows at the beginning of every season. To wash your duvet and pillows, use cold water and a delicate cycle. If you use a hot wash, the fibbers will begin to break down and your duvet and pillows will wear out faster. 

Thread count

It’s logical to think that the higher the thread count is the better the quality will be. In fact, this is a lie. It’s not the thread count that is important, it is the quality of the thread. To find the best thread quality, look for the bedding with the longest thread; these are usually stronger and therefore will last longer. 

Photo by Suzy Hazelwood from Pexels

Don’t overfill your tumble dryer

If you’re using a tumble dryer to dry your bed sheets make sure to only half-fill it, even if that means having to dry your sheets in two loads. Over-filling your tumble dryer will leave your bedding twisted together, with no room for the fabric to dry and go back to it’s original shape. 

Photo by C Technical from Pexels

Organic cotton 

The best bedding is made from organic cotton, meaning that there was no chemicals added to the bedding throughout the whole process of it being made. When you are buying organic cotton bedding make sure that you always check the label. Some ‘organic cotton’ bedding may have been made using cotton that was organically grown, but was then mixed with toxic chemicals to produce the end result. For 100% organic cotton bedding check for a Oeko-Tex certification. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Egyptian cotton 

Egyptian cotton sheets are expensive because their fibres are strong and soft, making them durable whilst remaining comfortable to sleep on. Before purchasing Egyptian cotton sheets, make sure that they are 100% Egyptian cotton. Some companies will claim that their sheets are Egyptian cotton, but this could mean that only a percentage of the fibres used were Egyptian cotton. If you are going to spend your money on Egyptian cotton sheets, make sure that you are paying for 100% Egyptian cotton.

Photo by picjumbo.com from Pexels

Bamboo sheets

Bamboo sheets naturally regulate your temperature to keep you warm in the winter and cool during the summer. As soon as you become too hot and begin to sweat, the bamboo in your sheets pulls the moisture away from you, and into the sheets, keeping you at a regulated temperature. They are also sustainable and have anti-allergen qualities. 

Spruce up your bedding 

The most effective way to spruce up your bedding is to buy new pillowcases. Every 6 months buy fresh pillowcases and breathe some life back into your sheets. It is the most cost effective way to keep your bed looking fresh. 

Use Laundryheap 

At Laundryheap, we offer a special dry cleaning service to suit all of your bedding needs. Simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to book your bedding service today. 


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Fun facts about Denmark

The Scandinavian country of Denmark can be found in Northern Europe. Home to 5.8 million people, Denmark is the smallest of the Scandinavian countries. Here are 10 more fun facts about Denmark. 

  • A happy country
  • The oldest flag in the world
  • Danish pastries
  • Danish alphabet 
  • The oldest amusement parks in the world
  • Lego 
  • Copenhagen harbour 
  • Unofficial Danish law 
  • A bicycle nation 
  • Same-sex marriage

A happy country 

Denmark has held the title of the world’s happiest country on multiple occasions. According to the UN World Happiness Report for 2020, Copenhagen, the capital city of Denmark, is the 5th happiest city in the world. Why is Denmark such a happy country? According to The World Happiness Report, happiness is closely linked to social equality and community spirit, both of which Denmark has in abundance. 

The oldest flag in the world  

The Danish flag, ‘Dannebrog’, is the oldest state flag in the world that is still in use by an independent nation. It was first acknowledged in 1219 and can be seen across Denmark as a symbol of pride. The Dannebrog is often flown during celebrations such as birthdays and can even be seen on Christmas trees. 

Danish pastries 

This may come as a surprise, but Danish pastries are not actually Danish. In the 1840’s a group of Austrian bakers settled in Denmark and began making, what we all now know as, Danish pastries. In Denmark, they actually call Danish pastries wienerbrød or Viennese bread. 

Danish alphabet 

Danish is an incredibly complex language to learn. Not only are there an abundance of silent letters and difficult pronunciations, but there are also an additional three letters in their alphabet, Æ, Ø and Å. 

Image by Mira Cosic from Pixabay

The oldest amusement parks in the world

If you are in Denmark and looking for something fun to do, then you could visit the two oldest amusement parks in the world.

Originating in 1583, Bakken is the oldest amusement park in the world. Originally, people would flock from Copenhagen to bathe in the natural spring at the park, whilst being entertained by local performers. Nowadays you can visit vendors, watch a variety of entertainers, and enjoy the rides. What is more, entrance to the park is free. 

Tivoli Gardens is the second oldest theme park in the world. Opened in 1843, Tivoli Gardens is home to a variety of themed buildings, rides, and even a scenic railway. You can find the park a two-minute walk away from Copenhagen’s central train station. 

Image by Curtis Gregory Perry

Lego

The world-famous Lego brick was invented by Danish carpenter Ole Kirk Kristiansen in 1932. The name Lego is an abbreviation of ‘leg godt’, which means ‘play well’. The company has been passed down through the generations, and is now owned by Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen, grandchild of Ole Kirk Kristiansen. In Denmark you can explore the original Legoland, and learn more about the history of Lego at the Lego House. 

Copenhagen harbour    

In Denmark you are never more than 52km from the ocean. If you don’t fancy going to the beach, you can take a dip in Copenhagen harbour. There are a handful of harbour baths along Copenhagen’s harbour, such as Islands Brygge and Nordhavn. These baths are clean enough to enjoy a quick dip in.

Unofficial Danish law 

A key part of the Danish culture and mentality is that everyone is accepted and equal. The unofficial Danish law, ‘Janteloven’, dates back to a fictional book written by Norwegian author Axel Sandemose in 1933. The book is set in the Danish town of Jante, and narrates the unwritten social codes that the residents followed of living equally. These social codes reflected the way that the Danes did, and still do, maintain peace and acceptance in their country. 

A bicycle nation 

There are more bicycles in Denmark then there are people and, in Copenhagen, a person will cycle an average of 3 km a day. This adds up to cycling 35 times around the world every day. Many people in Demark cycle rather than drive because cars are taxed highly to discourage people from driving. Additionally, Denmark, as a country, is particularly flat, with the highest peak being 170m. 

Same-sex marriage 

Scandinavian countries are known for being progressive, and Denmark is no exception. In 1989 Denmark became the first country to legalise same-sex unions, and in 2012 they legalised same-sex marriage. Opinion polls in Denmark show that 86% of the public support same-sex marriage and unions.

At Laundryheap, we are very excited to have officially launched in Copenhagen. If you are in Copenhagen, book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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Fun facts about Qatar

Image by Konevi from Pixabay

Qatar is a country in the Middle East, home to 2.8 million people. Here are some fun facts that you may not have known about it. 

  • The wealthiest country in the world 
  • A flat country 
  • City dwellers 
  • No rainforest 
  • Natural disasters 
  • Robot camel racing 
  • A population of men 
  • The best airline 
  • Lamp bear 
  • 2022 world cup 

The wealthiest country in the world 

Qatar’s per capita GDP is $130,475, making it the richest country in the world. The second richest country is Luxembourg, with a per capita of $116,808.

Image by Vintage Printery

A flat country 

You won’t find any hills or mountains in Qatar. The average elevation is 28 meters, making it the second flattest country in the world. The first is the Maldives. 

City dwellers 

Doha, the capital city of Qatar, is one of the most urbanised places in the world. 99% of people live in the city or surrounding towns. 

No rainforest 

Qatar is made up of mostly desert. Only 5% of the land is used for agriculture. As such, it is one of the four territories with no rainforest. The other countries are San Marino, Greenland, and Oman. 

Natural disasters 

According to the World Risk Report, Qatar is the least likely country for a natural disaster to occur. In fact, there is a 0.1% chance of an earthquake occurring in Qatar. 

Image by Konevi from Pixabay

Robot camel racing 

One of the favourite local sports for Qatar residents is camel racing, however, rather than using jockeys, robots ride the camels. You can catch a race in the small town of Al Shahaniya.

A population of men 

Qatar is home to around 2.8 million people, however, only around 700,000 of them are women.

The best airline 

Qatar’s airline, aptly named Qatar Airways, has won ‘The Best Airline of the Year’ award five times at the Skytrax World Airline Awards. It is the only airline in history to have achieved this. 

Lamp bear 

As soon as you touchdown in Hamad International Airport you are greeted with the friendly presence of Lamp Bear. Lamp Bear is an art installation by Swiss artist Urs Fischer. The piece cost roughly $6.8 million. 

Image by Nelo Hotsuma

2022 world cup 

In 2022 Qatar will host the FIFA World Cup, making it the first World Cup to be hosted in the Arab World and only the second world cup to be held in Asia. In addition to this, it is the smallest nation by land size to ever host the world cup. 

If you are residing, or travelling, in Qatar, don’t let laundry get in your way. Book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Fun facts about Bahrain

Image by onasama from Pixabay

Bahrain is a sovereign state in the Persian Gulf. Here are 10 fun facts about the country.  

  • A small Asian country
  • Bahrain’s population
  • The Bahraini dollar 
  • Wind turbines 
  • The first Middle East Grand Prix
  • Biggest consumer of electricity 
  • Al-Fateh Mosque
  • The Tree of Life 
  • Chicken Machboos 
  •  Al Khalifa family

A small Asian country 

Bahrain is the third smallest country in Asia, and the smallest sovereign state in the Middle East. The only two Asian countries that are smaller are Singapore and the Maldives. 

Image by Francisco Anzola

Bahrain’s population 

As of October 2020, the population of Bahrain was 1,701,575. Most of the population live in Manama and Al Muharraq, the two main cities of Bahrain.

The Bahraini dinar

The Bahraini dinar is the official currency of Bahrain. It was introduced in 1965 to replace the Gulf rupee. It is the worlds second most valuable currency after the Kuwait dinar. 

Wind turbines

The Bahrain World Trade Center was the world’s first skyscraper to integrate wind turbines in its design. Standing 240 meters tall, it is a twin-tower complex that can be found in Manama. The towers are connected by three sky bridges, each holding 225 kW wind turbines. They are estimated to provide 11-15% of the tower’s total power consumption. 

Image by Arne Bevaart

 The first Middle East Grand Prix

In 2004 Bahrain staged the Middle East’s first Formula 1 Grand Prix. The first race took place at the Bahrain International Circuit on 4th April 2004. The event was such a success that it was given the award for “Best Organised Grand Prix” by the FIA. 

Image by JaffaPix +6 million views-w

Biggest consumer of electricity 

Per-capita, Bahrain is the biggest consumer of electricity in Asia and the third largest in the world. The only two countries that use more electricity are Iceland and Norway. 

Al-Fateh Mosque 

Al-Fateh Mosque is one of the largest mosques in the world. Built in 1987, it takes up 6,500 square meters and can hold over 7,000 worshippers at one time. In 2006, Al-Fateh Mosque became the site of the National Library of Bahrain. 

Image by Jacobs – Creative Bees

The Tree of Life 

The Tree of Life is a single mesquite tree that was planted in the southern desert around 1583. Despite there being a severe lack of rain in Bahrain, and no obvious water source close to the tree, it continues to flourish. It has become somewhat of a tourist attraction and is visited by approximately 65,000 people per year. 

Image by Omar Chatriwala

Chicken Machboos

Chicken Machboos is Bahrain’s national dish. Consisting of tender chicken and rice flavoured with a blend of spices and dried loomi (dried and brined limes). 

Image by ~W~

Al Khalifa family 

The Al Khalifa family began ruling over Bahrain in 1782. Interestingly, the family are still in power today. As of 2010 roughly half of the cabinet ministers of Bahrain are members of the Al Khalifa family, as is the country’s prime minister. 

Image by priyatnadp

If you are living or travelling in Bahrain make sure to use Laundryheap. We will pick up, dry clean, and re-deliver your clothes to you. To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.