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The parks of Copenhagen

Image by Better Than Bacon

Wherever you are in Copenhagen, you will be no more than 15 minutes away from a park- this is part of what makes it a green city. These are just 5 of our favourite Copenhagen parks. 

  • Frederiksberg Have
  • Amaliehaven
  • Kongens Have
  • Botanical Garden
  • Bibliotekshaven

Frederiksberg Have

Nestled within Frederiksberg Have you can find a Chinese summer house, 7-meter waterfall, and, overlooking the grounds, the Frederiksberg Palace, where Frederik VI resided in the 1700s. Whilst living in the palace, Frederik VI would be rowed about on the canals that flow through the grounds. Today, you can take a guided tour of the very same canals, and observe the grand gardens from the water, before exploring them on foot. After exploring the gardens, sit on the luscious grass and enjoy a picnic in the sun.

Amaliehaven

Located between Amalienborg, the royal residence of Queen Margrethe II, and Copenhagens waterfront, Amaliehaven is a green oasis. The garden was designed by Belgian landscape architect Jean Delogne. His rectangular design of the green space contrasts perfectly with the natural curves of the flowering plants within the garden. The crowning glory of Amaliehaven is the large fountain in the center of the space, which provides the perfect location to sit and breathe away from the city. 

Kongens Have

Established in the early 17th century, Kongens Have is the oldest park in Copenhagen. Originally serving as the private gardens for King Christian IV’s Rosenborg Castle, the park is now visited by roughly 2.5 million people every year. Despite having been renovated several times, three of the original entrances to Kongens Have remain, as does the Hercules Pavillon, and statue of renowned author Hans Christian Andersen. During the summer months, the park becomes crowded with tourists and locals alike eager to catch some sun. 

Image by Kristoffer Trolle

Botanical Garden

Containing over 13,000 species of plants, the Botanical Garden can be found in the center of Copenhagen. Covering an area of 10 hectares, it is home to an array of Danish, perennial, and annual plants, as well as a rock garden housing plants found in mountainous areas in Central and Southern Europe. First established in 1600, the Botanical Garden was moved twice before given its permanent location in 1870. Amongst the array of astoundingly beautiful plants, there are 27 historical glasshouses. The most notable of these glasshouses is the Old Palm House, which was built in 1874. 

Bibliotekshaven

Bibliotekshaven is the garden of the Royal Danish Library. Originally, the land was used as a naval harbour which connected to the main harbour via a small canal. When the navy was moved to Holmens Kanal, the harbour was filled in. In honour of its maritime origins, there is a small pond in the middle of the garden, and an old mooring ring, not dissimilar to the ones used by ships in the 17th and 18th centuries, built into the masonry at the end of the garden. Visitors to the garden can observe the flowers changing with the seasons sitting comfortably on benches nestled across the grounds. 

Spend less time doing your laundry, and more time enjoying the parks around you, by letting Laundryheap sort your washing for you. To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Swedish must-reads

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Swedish literature has given us some of the best tales of all time. From children’s stories to crime, romance to comedy, these are just 10 of the must-read books written by Swedish authors. 

  • Hanna’s Daughters by Marianne Fredriksson
  • The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson
  • Depths by Henning Mankell
  • Wilful Disregard by Lena Andersson
  • The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
  • Pippi Langkous by Astrid Lindgren
  • Doctor Glas by Hjalmar Söderberg
  • The Emigrants by Vilhelm Moberg
  • Autumn by Karl Ove Knausgaard
  • The Wonderful Adventures of Nils by Selma Lagerlöf

Hanna’s Daughters by Marianne Fredriksson

If you would like to learn some of the history of Sweden, but don’t fancy reading a long-winded history book, read Hanna’s Daughters. Marianne Fredriksson explores the love, loss, and sacrifice of family life through the eyes of three generations of women. With the ever-changing backdrop of Sweden, this novel will educate you on how Sweden has changed in 100 years, and how that change affected the lives of a grandmother, mother, and daughter. 

Photo by RF._.studio from Pexels

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson

You will have likely heard this title before, as the novel was made into a box office hit in 2011. The book was released in 2005 and is the first novel of the Millennium Series by Steig Larsson. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, is a dark psychological thriller, following journalist Mikael Blomkvist and computer hacker Lisbeth Salander as they investigate the murder of Harriet Vanger. More than 100 million copies of the novel have been sold worldwide and it was ranked in The Guardian’s list of ‘100 Best Books of the 21st Century’. 

Photo by Rahul Shah from Pexels

Depths by Henning Mankell

Henning Mankell was a notorious crime author in Sweden, best known for his Wallander series. Depths is a step outside of the usual for Mankell, as he explores historical fiction through the tale of a Navel engineer in the first world war. The story begins with the naval engineer becoming dangerously obsessed with a beautiful woman, and quickly spirals into a warning tale of the dangers of deception. 

Photo by Caio from Pexels

Wilful Disregard by Lena Andersson

Winner of the August Prize 2013, Wilful Disregard is a boy-meets-girl story quite like no other. The tale begins when writer Ester Nilsson is invited to give a lecture about artist Hugo Rask. The two meet for long dinners where they talk extensively, to the point where Ester falls in unrequited love. Despite Ester yearning for his love, Hugo gives her just enough hope to think he may fall for her, before taking it away. In this novel, Lena Anderson dissects the theme of love and passion and retells the classic boy-meets-girl tale in a brutally honest way.

Photo by Ravi Kant from Pexels

The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson

The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window, was the bestselling novel of 2010 in Sweden. The story begins on Allan’s 100th birthday, which he celebrates by breaking out of the old people’s home he resides in. He is determined to fill his final days with adventure and, as he does, we learn of the adventures he has had in his past. This piece of hilarious comedy fiction is bound to make you laugh out loud. Once you have finished reading the book, watch the 2013 film adaptation of the same name.  

Photo by Samson Katt from Pexels

Pippi Langkous by Astrid Lindgren

Pippi Langkous, or Pippi Longstocking, has been an icon of children’s literature since her first appearance in 1945. She is a 9-year-old girl who lives alone with her pet monkey, horse, and a suitcase full of gold. She has superhuman strength and an anarchic attitude, which leads her on a multitude of fun adventures and mishaps. Pippi Longstocking is still widely read, and the character has been developed for TV and film and is still inspiring children to have fun adventures today. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Doctor Glas by Hjalmar Söderberg

When Doctor Glas was first published in 1905, it quickly became one of the most controversial books of the 1900s. Söderberg was a novelist, playwright, poet, and journalist, but Doctor Glas nearly ruined his career. The novel tells the story of the titular character and his love for one of his married patients. As his lover begins to confide in him about her failed marriage with a clergyman, Doctor Glas begins to ponder on whether to murder her husband, and what the repercussions of this act may be. With themes such as murder, abortion, and women’s rights heavily featuring throughout the book, it was heavily criticized when it was first published but is now considered a Swedish classic. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

The Emigrants by Vilhelm Moberg

The Emigrants is part history, part drama, and 100% gripping. Split into 4 volumes, it tells the history of the crushing poverty that forced 1.5 million Swedes to emigrate to North America in the 1800s. The tale focuses on Kristina and Karl-Oskar and their family, friends, and enemies, but serves as a representation of the history of millions. It perfectly explains why so many Swedes have a complicated relationship with both Swedish and American history. 

Photo by Daria Shevtsova from Pexels

Autumn by Karl Ove Knausgaard

Autumn is one of the four books that Ove Knausgaard wrote with a seasonal title. It is autobiographical, and begins with a letter written by Knausgaard to his unborn child. The book itself is an introspective account of Knausgaard’s daily life with his wife and children in rural Sweden. Despite its mundane content, the way Knausgaard writes is reflective, and made Autumn a New York Times bestseller. 

Photo by Gabby K from Pexels

The Wonderful Adventures of Nils by Selma Lagerlöf

This dark, yet geographically educational, children’s book has been a young reader’s staple since it was first published in 1906. The book begins with Nils mistreating animals on his family’s farm. When Nils is turned into an elf, he mounts a goose and flies across Sweden. As Nils travels from province to province, tales are told of characters in each province. This book is adventurous and fun and has taught children about the country of Sweden since it was first published. 

Photo by Alex Green from Pexels

Whilst you read, we will make sure that your laundry basket doesn’t overflow. To book your Laundryheap order, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Fun facts about Denmark

The Scandinavian country of Denmark can be found in Northern Europe. Home to 5.8 million people, Denmark is the smallest of the Scandinavian countries. Here are 10 more fun facts about Denmark. 

  • A happy country
  • The oldest flag in the world
  • Danish pastries
  • Danish alphabet 
  • The oldest amusement parks in the world
  • Lego 
  • Copenhagen harbour 
  • Unofficial Danish law 
  • A bicycle nation 
  • Same-sex marriage

A happy country 

Denmark has held the title of the world’s happiest country on multiple occasions. According to the UN World Happiness Report for 2020, Copenhagen, the capital city of Denmark, is the 5th happiest city in the world. Why is Denmark such a happy country? According to The World Happiness Report, happiness is closely linked to social equality and community spirit, both of which Denmark has in abundance. 

The oldest flag in the world  

The Danish flag, ‘Dannebrog’, is the oldest state flag in the world that is still in use by an independent nation. It was first acknowledged in 1219 and can be seen across Denmark as a symbol of pride. The Dannebrog is often flown during celebrations such as birthdays and can even be seen on Christmas trees. 

Danish pastries 

This may come as a surprise, but Danish pastries are not actually Danish. In the 1840’s a group of Austrian bakers settled in Denmark and began making, what we all now know as, Danish pastries. In Denmark, they actually call Danish pastries wienerbrød or Viennese bread. 

Danish alphabet 

Danish is an incredibly complex language to learn. Not only are there an abundance of silent letters and difficult pronunciations, but there are also an additional three letters in their alphabet, Æ, Ø and Å. 

Image by Mira Cosic from Pixabay

The oldest amusement parks in the world

If you are in Denmark and looking for something fun to do, then you could visit the two oldest amusement parks in the world.

Originating in 1583, Bakken is the oldest amusement park in the world. Originally, people would flock from Copenhagen to bathe in the natural spring at the park, whilst being entertained by local performers. Nowadays you can visit vendors, watch a variety of entertainers, and enjoy the rides. What is more, entrance to the park is free. 

Tivoli Gardens is the second oldest theme park in the world. Opened in 1843, Tivoli Gardens is home to a variety of themed buildings, rides, and even a scenic railway. You can find the park a two-minute walk away from Copenhagen’s central train station. 

Image by Curtis Gregory Perry

Lego

The world-famous Lego brick was invented by Danish carpenter Ole Kirk Kristiansen in 1932. The name Lego is an abbreviation of ‘leg godt’, which means ‘play well’. The company has been passed down through the generations, and is now owned by Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen, grandchild of Ole Kirk Kristiansen. In Denmark you can explore the original Legoland, and learn more about the history of Lego at the Lego House. 

Copenhagen harbour    

In Denmark you are never more than 52km from the ocean. If you don’t fancy going to the beach, you can take a dip in Copenhagen harbour. There are a handful of harbour baths along Copenhagen’s harbour, such as Islands Brygge and Nordhavn. These baths are clean enough to enjoy a quick dip in.

Unofficial Danish law 

A key part of the Danish culture and mentality is that everyone is accepted and equal. The unofficial Danish law, ‘Janteloven’, dates back to a fictional book written by Norwegian author Axel Sandemose in 1933. The book is set in the Danish town of Jante, and narrates the unwritten social codes that the residents followed of living equally. These social codes reflected the way that the Danes did, and still do, maintain peace and acceptance in their country. 

A bicycle nation 

There are more bicycles in Denmark then there are people and, in Copenhagen, a person will cycle an average of 3 km a day. This adds up to cycling 35 times around the world every day. Many people in Demark cycle rather than drive because cars are taxed highly to discourage people from driving. Additionally, Denmark, as a country, is particularly flat, with the highest peak being 170m. 

Same-sex marriage 

Scandinavian countries are known for being progressive, and Denmark is no exception. In 1989 Denmark became the first country to legalise same-sex unions, and in 2012 they legalised same-sex marriage. Opinion polls in Denmark show that 86% of the public support same-sex marriage and unions.

At Laundryheap, we are very excited to have officially launched in Copenhagen. If you are in Copenhagen, book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app.