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How To Tie A Headscarf

The Headscarf has a storied history dating back to Ancient Rome and the Middle East. Today, the headscarf is still important to religious groups and the fashion industry. if you’re interested in wearing one, we will walk you through how to tie a headscarf!

First things first, before learning to tie a headscarf, we recommend the square headscarves as they’re beginner-friendly and there is a lot more you can do with them, stylistically.

Here are three popular headscarves and the steps to tie them below.

  • Rosette Wrap
  • Boho Headscarf
  • Babushka

Rosette Wrap

One popular headscarf style is the Rosette Wrap.

To tie your headscarf using this style:

  1. Tie your hair so it becomes a ponytail.
  2. Fold the scarf and create a triangle.
  3. After you’ve folded your scarf, put the ends of the scarf to the front of your forehead.
  4. Twists the ends together leading into a spiral
  5. Lastly, tuck the ends in to secure the scarf.

Boho Headscarf

The boho headscarf is suited for the hot weather and will cover (no pun intended) the summer look essentials! To get started:

  1. Fold your scarf in half to form a triangle.
  2. Wrap it around your forehead and tie the knot in the back.
  3. The corner of your scarf should be hanging down in the back.
  4. Make sure it is tight and comfortable as you tie the headscarf!

Babushka Headscarf

It’s easy to fall in love with the classic Babushka style and get inspired to tie a headscarf. This style is typically worn over the hair and tied below the chin.

What makes this headscarf style cool is that it will keep your hair in place! Whether you’re rushing to open the front door or going out in the rain or wind, the Babushka will cover your hair!

To tie this headscarf:

  1. Start by folding it in half to make a triangle.
  2. Simply place the folded edge on the top of your head (it needs to be centred).
  3. Take the two opposing ends and knot them under your chin. It’s as easy as 123!

Considering headscarves are fabric, take good care of them and be sure to check if they’re suited to be dry cleaned!

If you need your headscarves to be dry cleaned and look sharp, head over to the Laundryheap website to book your dry cleaning today!

You can also download the Laundryheap app on iOS or Android!

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Amsterdam Canal River


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Guide To Moving To Amsterdam

With a city full of breath-taking architecture, charming culture, captivating history, and delicious food, it’s easy to fall in love with Netherlands’ capital Amsterdam. If moving to Amsterdam is on your laundry list, here is a guide on moving to the City of Canals.

  • Housing
  • Education
  • Climate
  • Transport
  • Healthcare

Housing

Moving to a new country is a big step and certainly not easy. Amsterdam, unfortunately, is an expensive city to live in but we will guide you so you’re aware of your budget when moving to Amsterdam.

Depending on your lifestyle, there are ways to get by. If you’re living alone, a one-bedroom apartment will cost you between €900 – €2,000 monthly but if you’re planning to share accommodation, it will cost you €400 – €1,200 per month.  Unsurprisingly, rent is the biggest expense.

To lower costs, we recommend booking an Airbnb for a few months until you find the right place to live, finding apartments in Amsterdam does take time.

We also suggest looking at Laundryheap, it’s cheap, convenient and will save you cost when it comes to laundry.

Houses and living in Amsterdam
Houses in Amsterdam

Education

With a city full of vibrant nightlife, it is no surprise Amsterdam is popular with university students. If you’re a student wanting to experience the University of Amsterdam, let’s guide you on the essentials!

When compared to the United States, tuition fees are affordable and there are options for living on campus which is perfect for meeting new people! The benefits of scholarship programs significantly reduce the cost of tuition.

For students, we do offer laundry services in Amsterdam. You enjoy your weekend fun; we’ll take care of your laundry!

Education in Amsterdam. University of Amsterdam
University of Amsterdam

Climate

Settling into a new environment and climate takes some time, so it’s best to come prepared as Amsterdam isn’t always sunny. You don’t want to get a cold or the flu when arriving, so pack the winter essentials. The canals are gorgeous, but they can be extremely freezing!

If you’re moving in with a big family or kids, the climate in the spring and summer welcomes plenty of outdoor activity and a chance to relax in the park.

Outdoor activities will likely mean your laundry needs doing but no stress, we’ve got that covered!

Amsterdam weather. Hazy sky
Hazy Sky in Amsterdam

Transport

Amsterdam is known for its fantastic cycling infrastructure but with an efficient and reliable public transport system, finding your way around the city is easy! To guide you through Amsterdam, the local train network operated by NS is your friend when commuting. In the Netherlands, be sure to apply for an OV-chipkaart which is a national smart card for paying your transport fees.

We’ll give you a heads up; in the winter, train stations tend to be busier so make sure your daily house chores are done in an efficient way as the busier journeys do make you tired later!

Like with other places around the world, there are shops in and around train stations so if you need your coffee fix, you are in luck.

Train Station in Amsterdam
Public Transport in Amsterdam

Healthcare

Health is wealth and the Dutch do know how to take care of themselves. Living in the Netherlands would mean you have basic insurance that covers GP visits and hospital stays but it will only cost you €100-€120 and a small percentage is from your employer.

To register with a healthcare provider, be sure to get in contact with the local council to receive a citizen service number and register for health insurance and a local doctor.

Additionally, we recommend getting a borderless multi-currency account to manage your health insurance fees. When it comes to fee organisation, this is just what the doctor ordered!

Ambulance in Netherlands. Healthcare system.
Ambulance in Netherlands

Whether you’re moving to Amsterdam by yourself, with family or with your spouse, relocating is a difficult yet exciting chapter. Get used to the locals and get to know the city.

To help you get settled quickly, we’ll do your laundry for you. Simply download the Laundryheap app (available on iOS and Android) and we’ll pick up, wash and deliver your clothes to you within 24 hours.


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Dubai’s top 5 culture hotspots 

Photo by Nextvoyage from Pexels

Dubai is a cultural mecca. It’s a city that combines the innovation of technological advances with Dubai tradition. These are just 5 of the culture hotspots to check out the next time you visit Dubai. 

  • Al Fahidi 
  • Grand Mosque
  • Al Shindagha Museum
  • Alserkal Avenue
  • Hatta 

Al Fahidi

Have you ever wondered what it was like to live in Dubai during the late 19th century? If your answer was yes, then the historic town of Al Fahidi is the perfect culture hotspot for you. Located along the Dubai Creek, Al Fahidi was originally built in the early 1900’s, and many of the towns original buildings are still intact. As you trek the winding streets, admiring the historical buildings, you will come across several museums, art galleries, and traditional food stalls which will transport you to 1900’s Dubai. To get as much historic knowledge about Old Dubai as possible, book yourself on a walking tour of the town. 

Image by Ankur Panchbudhe

Grand Mosque

The Grand Mosque is the hub of religious and cultural life in Dubai. Holding up to 1,200 worshippers, it is an architectural masterpiece with intricate geometric carvings and blue mosaic. The original Grand Mosque was built in 1900, but was replaced in 1960 and re-built again in 1998 to resemble the original structure. Non-Muslims can enter The Grand Mosque from 9:30am to 11:30am Sunday to Thursday for free tours.

Image by Guilhem Vellut

Al Shindagha Museum

If you would like to learn more about Dubai’s creek history, and wider Emirati culture, than head to the Al Shindagha Museum. Sat along the Dubai Creek, the Al Shindagha Museum offers a carefully curated tour of interactive videos, historic photos, and artefacts that show exactly what it was like to raise a family by Dubai’s waterway. Then, explore the legacy and trading importance of Emirati fragrances at The Perfume House. The Al Shindagha Museum is a fascinating day out, overflowing with beautiful artefacts and interactive fun. 

Image by A.Davey

Alserkal Avenue

Alserkal Avenue is the cultural hotspot of modern Dubai. What was once an industrial area of 40 warehouses has been transformed into a cultural bohemian of art galleries, dance studios, and artisanal cafes. The transformation of Alserkal Avenue began in 2008 when one gallery moved to the area. Word soon caught on, and over the past 13 years contemporary artists have been relocating to the area, creating the Alserkal Avenue you see today. Discover new art and some of the best coffee Dubai has to offer at Alserkal Avenue. 

Image by siska maria eviline

Hatta

Venture outside of the skyscraper city of Dubai and to the beautiful mountain village of Hatta. Many people visit Hatta to take part in activities such as mountain biking and paddle boarding, however the historic village of Hatta is also incredible to explore. In the town centre, you can find Hatta Heritage Village, which has been preserved and reconstructed to showcase centuries of rural living in Dubai. You can wander through traditional Dubai huts, and even observe villagers carrying out traditional activities, such as making jewellery, weaponry, and pottery. The beautiful surroundings of Hatta, coupled with learning about the historic culture of the village, make for an unforgettable day out. 

Image by Sergei Gussev

Don’t let laundry stop you from exploring the cultural hotspots of Dubai. Book your Laundryheap service today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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Top places to visit in Boston

Boston is the capital city of Massachusetts. It is overflowing  with history and culture for you to explore at your leisure. 

  • Boston Common
  • Freedom Trail 
  • Faneuil Hall
  • Boston waterfront 
  • Boston Public Library 
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
  • Boston Museum of Fine Art 
  • Fenway Park 
  • The North End 
  • Museum of Science

Boston Common 

Boston Common can be found right in the heart of the city. It is America’s oldest park and is used by tourists and locals all year round. From November to mid-March you can rent skates and go ice skating on the Frog Pond. In the Spring months, you can watch blossoms bloom, and, in the summer, enjoy splashing around in the wading pool.

Adjoining the park, is the 24-acre Public Garden, America’s oldest botanical garden. It is here, that you can experience one of Boston’s most iconic experiences- sailing across the lake in Swan Boats, established in the 1870s. 

Freedom Trail 

Boston Common is also the beginning of the Freedom Trail- a three-mile trail that leads you to 16 of Boston’s historic monuments and sites. To follow the trail, simply keep to the red bricks on the sidewalk and footprints at the street crossings. 

You will begin your trail at Boston Common, where you can pick up brochures about each site you will be visiting at the Visitor Centre. From Boston Common, you can visit the State House, before moving on to the Old Granary Burying Ground, King’s Chapel Burying Ground, and the Old State House. 

The Boston Freedom Trail is the perfect way to learn a brief history of Boston, and America, in one day. 

Faneuil Hall

Faneuil Hall was built in 1740 as a market hall. It was presented to the city of Boston, under the condition that it would always be open to the public. On the ground floor, you can browse market stalls that spill over into the adjoining Faneuil Hall Marketplace, founded in the early 19th century. Here, you will find an abundance of shops, restaurants, and exhibitions. If the weather is nice, you may also find buskers and street performers in the square around the market. 

The second floor of Faneuil Hall is home to a council chamber where, in the 18th and 19th centuries, revolutionaries met. Above this chamber, you can explore the Ancient and Honourable Artillery Museum, which showcases an array of weaponry, uniforms, and paintings from significant battles.

Boston waterfront   

If you are looking for a spectacular view of the Boston city skyline, then head to the Boston waterfront. When you reach the waterfront, you can take a stroll along the harbour, currently 38 miles long, and take in the wonderful view of the city. The best way to experience the Boston waterfront, is by starting at the New England Aquarium and following the walk to the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse. Make sure you have your camera ready, because you won’t want to leave without a photo or two. 

Boston Public Library 

The Boston Public Library, founded in 1848, was the first publicly funded lending library in America. As you venture inside, you will find Renaissance Revival architecture and murals by John Singer Sargent and Edwin Abbey, granite medallions over the entrance arches, and three sets of bronze doors in the vestibule. It is one of the most beautiful buildings in Boston. 

Once you have admired inside the Boston Public Library, admire it on the outside by enjoying a picnic on the grassy lawn. You can relax amongst a strange mixture of old and new buildings, which tower over you in perfect harmony. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is a must-visit for fans of modern and postmodern architecture. Spread across 150 acres, you can explore the works of noted architects, such as Alvar Aalto, Eduardo Catalano, I. M. Pei, Frank Gehry, and Eero Saarinen. Littered around the museum are sculptures and installations by artists such as Pablo Picasso and Henry Moore, all which can be viewed with the help of a self-guided walking tour map. There is plenty to see at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Boston Museum of Fine Art  

Nestled within the Boston Museum of Fine Art you will find impressionist paintings, Asian and Persian fine art, and ancient art from Greece and the Middle East. Recently, the museum has expanded to house an array of American art, laid out in chronological order. In this wing you will find American paintings, furniture, decorative arts, folk art, silver, glassware, and design dating from pre-Columbia. You don’t have to be a lover of fine art to find something of interest in this vast museum. 

Fenway Park 

Home to the Boston Red Sox, Fenway Park is known as America’s Most Loved Ballpark. First opened on the 20th of April 1912, not a lot has changed in the century it has been opened. As you tour the park, you can observe some of it’s classic features, such as the hand-operated scoreboard. Don’t forget to get a picture of the Green Monster, Fenway Park’s 37-foot green wall that you can find in left field. Even if you aren’t a sports fan, you will find a tour of the quirky Fenway Park interesting. 

The North End 

North End is one of Boston’s oldest neighbourhoods. It is where silversmith and activist leader Paul Revere lived during the American Revolution. The house that he lived in at the time, situated in North End, is open to tour, as is the Old North Church, where lanterns were lit  in April 1775 to alert Paul Revere that British troops were headed to Lexington to arrest the patriot leaders and confiscate the munitions supplies.

The North End is Boston’s Italian neighbourhood and, asides from the historical importance of the site, is the best spot to find Italian restaurants, cafes, and bakeries. 

Museum of Science

You will find 700 permanent -hands-on exhibits at the Museum of Science. From physics and biology, to zoology and astronomy, no matter what your science interest is, you will find it at the museum. Just some of the highlights include a 65-million-year-old fossil, butterfly garden, and the planetarium which has daily laser and star shows. This museum is the perfect opportunity to explore science in the most interactive and engaging way possible.

Whilst you’re busy exploring the many sites of Boston, let us take care of your laundry. Book your Laundryheap service and we will pick-up, dry clean, and re-deliver your laundry to you within 24 hours. Simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the Laundryheap app, to book your service. 


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The ultimate guide to moving to Dublin

Blue Night Sky Cityscape Urban Dublin City

Dublin is the capital city of Ireland. It’s home to 1,273,069 people and has an unrivaled mix of historic buildings, open green spaces, and vibrant nightlife. If you’re moving to Dublin, here is everything you will need to know.

  • Housing 
  • Jobs
  • Transferring money
  • Education
  • Transport
  • Culture

Housing 

Before you begin looking at properties in Dublin, first consider how long you will be staying for and what space you need. There are several options for housing in Dublin, including a house, flat, or even a room share. The price of housing is dependant on the space that you acquire and how close to the city centre you are located. For example, on average, a one-bedroom apartment in Dublin city centre would cost you €1,013 to rent per month. In comparison, a one-bedroom apartment outside of the city centre would cost you €835 on average per month. If you are moving alone, and want to save some money, then consider moving into a house share. You will be given your own room, but you will share communal areas with other individuals in the house.

Jobs

Dublin has become a center for international business. Google, eBay, and Amazon all have offices in and around the Dublin area. Asides from international business, tourism is a big moneymaker in Dublin. Being home to Guinness and Jameson whiskey, in addition to the array of historic buildings there are to visit, there are plenty of jobs available in the tourism sector of Dublin.

Transferring money

Once you have moved to Dublin you will need to transfer your money into euros. When transferring your money it’s best to look for somewhere that will give you the best exchange rate. This could be your bank or an outside company. You need to make sure that your money is transferred in a safe and secure way, so do plenty of research before you decide how to transfer your money. 

Education

Education is mandatory in Dublin from the age of 4 to 18. There are both public and private schools available, however, it is important to remember that private schools charge fees to attend whereas public schools do not. For those who want to continue their education after mandatory education, there are a number of prestigious universities in Dublin including Trinity College, which is notoriously difficult to get into. 

SONY DSC

Transport 

There are several ways to get around the city of Dublin including bus, tram, and bike.

There are over 900 buses, and 18 night busses, that service Dublin and its surrounding suburbs. The price of a bus ride is dependent on how far you are traveling, however, it usually falls around €3. 

The Luas Tram is the most time-efficient way to travel around Dublin. It consists of two tram lines, the Green Line and the Red Line, which connect suburban areas of Dublin to the city center. Similarly to the buses, the prices of the tram vary. On average a one-way ticket costs €2.50, however, if you are regularly traveling in and out of Dublin, you can purchase a week pass for €24, or a monthly pass for €95. 

If you want to get some exercise whilst travelling through the city, there are Coca-Cola Zero Dublin Bikes available to hire. These bikes are a self-service rental system that can be used across Dublin. What is more, the first 30 minutes of your bike ride is completely free of charge. If you are planning on using the bikes more than once you may want to consider buying an annual card for €20. 

Image by William Murphy

Culture 

Dublin is the cultural epicentre of Irish life. The city has homed some of the most renowned talents from history, including legendary playwright Oscar Wilde, novelist Bram Stoker, and, of course, lead singer of U2 Bono.

There are a plethora of museums and art galleries in Dublin that showcase both ancient and modern history. If you are a lover of the arts, there are daily concerts, theatre performances, and exhibitions that are waiting to be explored. 

Aside from the abundance of art, history, and performances that can be enjoyed in and around Dublin, the city is also well-known for its spectacular food. Home to five Michelin star restaurants, and a food festival during the month of June, Dublin’s food pedigree is growing every year. 

Image by q phia

If you’re worried about doing your laundry in Dublin, don’t, because we are here to help. Laundryheap is fully operational in Dublin. Head to the Laundryheap website and use our postcode searcher to find out if we deliver to you.