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Puffer jacket care guide

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

As we adjust to the changing autumn weather, it’s time to dig out and brush off our jackets. The best way to ensure that your jacket lasts the whole autumn and winter season is to properly care for it. This is your puffer jacket care guide. 

  • Be aware of sharp objects 
  • Pre wash 
  • Machine wash
  • Hand wash
  • Dry on a low heat
  • Air dry
  • Store

Be aware of sharp objects 

Puffer jackets, as the name suggests, have a quilted design made from pockets of insulation that make the sections between the stitching puffy. This insulation makes puffer jackets incredibly warm, but also vulnerable to snags and tears. When wearing your jacket, be mindful of sharp objects that you may come in to contact with. If you do accidentally tear your puffer jacket, re-stuff the area if any insulation has escaped, before using a needle and thread to mend the hole. Make sure that all snags and tears have been mended before you wash your jacket. 

Photo by Yan Krukov from Pexels

Pre wash

Before you wash your puffer jacket it is important to empty all of the pockets and zip up the zipper. This will firstly ensure that you don’t accidentally wash something valuable, and also prevent any unwanted materials, such as tissues, from becoming stuck to your jacket during the washing process. For extra protection, lubricate the zipper with gel to prevent it from rusting and becoming difficult to use. It is also advisable to turn your puffer jacket inside out to avoid the delicate puffy pockets from being snagged and torn during washing.

Photo by Michael Burrows from Pexels

Machine wash

You should never wash your puffer jacket more than twice a year because detergents and washing machines can wear down its water protective shell. If you are using a washing machine to clean your puffer jacket it is best to use a top-loading machine as they don’t have a centre agitator that can catch and tear your jacket. 

The optimum washing machine cycle to use is a gentle cycle. This will limit the amount of times your jacket is spun in the machine, therefore reducing the possibility of your jacket being damaged. 

In terms of laundry detergent, a natural detergent or delicate fabric specific detergent is advised. Using a strong detergent will damage the filler that makes your puffer jacket puffy, resulting in your jacket deflating and becoming less insulating. 

Photo by Boris Pavlikovsky from Pexels

Hand wash

If you are concerned about damaging your puffer jacket in the washing machine, you can hand wash it instead. To hand wash your jacket, first fill a sink or bath with cold water, enough to submerge your jacket in. Next, add a teaspoon of delicate or natural detergent. Finally, submerge your jacket completely in the water, using gentle scrubbing motions to clean each section of your jacket. 

Once you are satisfied that your jacket has been adequately cleaned, rinse it with fresh cold water to ensure that all of the detergent has been removed. Next, lightly squeeze each section of your jacket to remove as much water as possible. Make sure that you are squeezing and not wringing your jacket as this could cause tears. 

Photo by Sinitta Leunen from Pexels

Dry on a low heat 

Despite the delicate fabric your puffer jacket is made from, it is recommended that you tumble dry your jacket. Use a low heat setting and allow your dryer to run until your jacket is completely dry. To ensure that your jacket remains puffy, add 2 tennis balls to your tumble dryer. The movement of the tennis balls in the dryer will redistribute the insulation in your jacket, ensuring that it stays puffy. Although tempting, do not use a high heat setting on your tumble dryer as this can melt the delicate outer shell of your jacket. 

Photo by Viacheslav Stopkevich from Pexels

Air dry 

If you do not have access to a tumble dryer, or you would prefer not to use one, you can air dry your puffer jacket. To air dry your jacket lay it completely flat on a clean dry towel, away from direct sunlight. Leave your jacket to completely dry, before using your hands to redistribute the insulation in your jacket, making it puffy and full bodied. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Store

Most puffer jackets come with handy bags that your jacket can be folded into. Although handy short-term, these bags should not be used to store your jacket for more than a handful of hours. Folding your puffer jacket into a small shape can damage the insulation in your jacket, causing it to be ineffective. Instead, hang your puffer jacket up on a coat hanger in a dry area after every wear. This will ensure that the jackets insulation remains well distributed throughout the pockets, and, if wet, your jacket can completely dry

Photo by Roman Pohorecki from Pexels

The best way to ensure that your puffer jacket lasts throughout the autumn and winter months is to have Laundryheap take care of it for you. To book your Laundryheap order simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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Must have laundry products 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Laundry is one of the worst chores, and yet one of the most important to regularly complete. These must-have laundry products make completing your laundry just that little bit easier. 

  • Laundry detergent 
  • Fabric softener
  • Bicarbonate of soda
  • Oxygen bleach 
  • Chlorine bleach
  • Distilled white vinegar
  • Dryer balls
  • Drying rack 
  • Laundry bag
  • Collapsible laundry basket

Laundry detergent 

You can’t do laundry without laundry detergent. Well, you could, but it wouldn’t be as easy. Laundry detergent helps pull away embedded dirt from your laundry and washes it away with water. Detergents come in the forms of powder, liquid, and pods, or you can make your own. Whether you have sensitive skin, want to use a lower temperature, or are trying to tackle tough stains, there is a laundry detergent for you. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Fabric softener

Fabric softener is the perfect accompaniment to your laundry detergent. Although it shouldn’t be used on every item, it helps fight wrinkles, reduces static, and makes laundry soft to the touch. Fabric softener is especially useful for those with irritable skin as it softens the fibres of your laundry, making items smoother against the skin. 

Photo by Liza Summer from Pexels

Baking soda

You may know baking soda as a must have baking product, but it is also a laundry must have. Baking soda is a natural mineral which can be used in several ways throughout the laundry process. For example, mixing 1 cup of baking soda with half a cup of water creates a paste that will lift common stains. Alternatively, adding half a cup of baking soda to your washing machine will help regulate the pH level in the water, allowing your laundry detergent to act more effectively to remove bacteria and dirt. Baking soda can also be used as a natural alternative to fabric softener and to control suds in your washing machine. 

Image by Aqua Mechanical

Oxygen bleach

Oxygen bleach, unlike chlorine bleach, is safe to use on all washable fabrics, except silk, wool, and leather, and can be used on both coloured and white laundry. When oxygen bleach is mixed with water the chemicals in the bleach oxidise and help to lift and remove deeply embedded dirt and stains, whilst brightening the colours of your laundry. You can use oxygen bleach as a pre-treatment or in your washing machine. 

Photo by Brittney Borowski from Pexels

Chlorine bleach

Chlorine bleach has a much stronger bleaching power than oxygen bleach which is why, if you are using it on coloured clothing, you must always test for colourfastness. It is, however, incredibly effective at removing tough stains, disinfecting, and brightening white clothing. Before using chlorine bleach, remember to always water it down as it can be corrosive and cause damage to your laundry and your skin. 

Photo by Nothing Ahead from Pexels

Distilled white vinegar

Much the same as baking soda, distilled white vinegar has many uses in the laundry room. If you have white laundry that’s looking a little grey, distilled white vinegar will get your items back to their original state. Simply add 1 cup of vinegar to a large pot of water and bring it to a boil. Once boiling, remove your watered down vinegar from the heat, add your items, and leave overnight. Wash your laundry as you usually would and be dazzled by how bright your whites have become. In addition to making whites whiter, distilled white vinegar can also be used as an alternative to fabric softener. Add half a cup to your washing machine and it will leave your clothing soft and smelling fresh. 

Image by Mike Mozart

Dryer balls

Drying laundry, even with a tumble dryer, is a hard task. That is why dryer balls are a must have laundry product. Dryer balls are small balls made from wool, plastic, or hard rubber, that reduces static in your laundry and reduces drying times. The balls roll between the layers of your laundry load as the tumble dryer spins, separating each item and allowing air to be evenly distributed throughout your laundry. In addition to this, dryer balls, on average, can be used in up to 1,000 washes, making them environmentally friendly and cost effective. 

Image by Marco Verch Professional Photographer

Drying rack

Even if you do have access to a tumble dryer, it’s always handy to have a drying rack. Although they aren’t the fastest way to dry your laundry, drying racks are the most environmentally friendly option. In addition, they come in a variety of shapes and sizes so they can fit any room, and they can be bought incredibly cheaply. If you are looking for a slightly quicker way to dry your clothes, there are heated drying racks available. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Laundry bag 

A laundry bag is perfect for washing your more delicate items, such as underwear or smaller items made of silk or lace. Simply place your items in your laundry bag, and wash them as you usually would. The bag will prevent your clothing from getting snagged in your washing machine, resulting in no expensive items being damaged. In addition to protecting your delicates, laundry bags will also prevent you from losing your socks.

Image by Bill Ward

Collapsible laundry basket 

If you find that laundry takes up a lot of your space, buy a collapsible laundry basket. Although it’s only a small space saver, they are incredibly convenient. Fill your basket with your laundry, and, once it is empty, fold it down and store it away until you need it again. They are easy to use, cost effective, and will save you at least a small amount of space. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

If you are running low on must have laundry products, don’t panic. We are here to help. Simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to book your Laundryheap order today.


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DIY Halloween costumes

Photo by Charles Parker from Pexels

Halloween is almost upon us and if you haven’t got your outfit sorted don’t panic. These 4 DIY costumes are easy to make and perfect for a Halloween full of thrills and chills. 

  • Ghost
  • Skeleton
  • Strawberry
  • Zombie bride

Ghost

Let’s start easy. A ghost costume is incredibly easy to achieve, very comfortable, and requires limited supplies. 

To make a ghost costume you will need…
  • A white sheet
  • Scissors 
  • Light coloured hat
  • Pen or pencil
  • Safety pins 
  • Black marker 

To begin making your ghost costume place your light coloured hat on your head. If your hat has a brim you must either cut it off or wear your hat backwards so that it doesn’t get in the way. 

Next, drape your white sheet over your head so that it’s laying evenly over your body. If your sheet is slightly too long, get a friend to use a pen to mark the excess fabric to a comfortable length. Whilst you are still wearing the sheet, get your friend to mark where the top of your head is, and use your fingers to demonstrate where your eyes are, marking them as well. 

Once the appropriate areas have been marked, take your sheet off. Use one safety pin to attach your hat to your sheet using the mark in the centre of the head. Use your remaining safety pins to make sure that the hat is secured to the sheet. 

With your scissors cut eye holes where they were marked. Once you have cut your eye holes, use your black marker to draw around them, making them more defined. You can also use your black maker to draw a nose and mouth if you wish. 

Finally, use your scissors to cut the excess fabric at the bottom of the sheet. For a more ghoulishly looking ghost, cut your fabric in a haphazard manner rather than in a straight line. You are now ready to put your costume on and enjoy a day of tricks and lots of treats. 

Photo by Charles Parker from Pexels

Skeleton 

If you are looking for a costume with a bit more body to it, why not go as a skeleton? 

To make a skeleton costume you will need… 
  • White masking tape 
  • Black clothing to cover your top and bottom half

To begin making your skeleton costume lay out your black clothing on a flat surface. Make sure that your clothes are adequately spread out so that you can see the whole garment. 

Create your skeleton by tearing off strips of masking tape of various lengths and sticking them to your black clothes. Your skeleton doesn’t have to be accurate, so don’t worry too much about getting the lengths and placement of the tape right. Make sure that you have covered the general areas, such as your arms, legs, and torso, before putting your costume on. 

To add to your slinky skeleton look you can paint your face to look like a skeleton using black and white face paint. Alternatively, you can print out a mask of a skeleton for an equally frightening look. 

Photo by Mike Jones from Pexels

Strawberry

Halloween costumes don’t always have to be scary. Go as something sweeter, and easy to make, like a strawberry

To make a strawberry costume you will need… 
  • Red clothing, ideally a dress
  • White felt
  • Long cylinder can (a crisp can will do)
  • Green cardboard
  • Pencil
  • A stretchy headband
  • Scissors 
  • Hot glue gun 

To begin making your strawberry costume, use your scissors to cut out lots of small teardrop shapes from your white felt. To make this step faster, layer 2 or 3 sheets of felt and cut through them at the same time. These teardrop shapes will be the seeds of your strawberry. 

Once you have finished cutting out your shapes, lay out your red clothing on a flat surface, making sure that you can see the whole garment. Using a hot glue gun, glue your felt shapes to your red clothing in a random pattern, making sure that your whole garment is covered. Once you have glued your white felt down, set your red clothing to one side to dry. 

Whilst your clothing is drying, you can make your leafy headpiece. To begin creating your headpiece use a pencil to trace the shape of 2 different sized leaves on your green cardboard. Ideally you want 4 large leaves and 5 or 6 slightly smaller leaves. Once you have drawn all of your leaves, use your scissors to cut them out. To make your strawberry leaves look more realistic, use your fingers to gently pinch the base of each leaf and slide your fingers up to the tip. This will create a gentle curl. 

Your can will be the base of your hat, so make sure that it is a comfortable height to place on your head. Use your glue gun to glue the biggest leaves around the can. Next, use the second biggest leaves to fill in the gaps in between the big leaves, making sure that you can no longer see the can. To finish off your headpiece, stick your headband to your can by making a line of hot glue at the base of your can.

Once your headband is secured you can shimmy your strawberry outfit on, and top it off with your leafy headpiece for more of a treat than a trick. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Zombie bride

We’ve all heard of bridezilla, well this costume is bridezilla if she were dead. Luckily, this outfit is a lot easier to put together than a wedding, so hopefully there won’t be any meltdowns. 

To make a zombie bride costume you will need… 
  • A white dress 
  • White veil (not essential but a nice touch)
  • Moisturiser
  • Light shade of foundation
  • White powder
  • Light blue eyeshadow
  • Smokey eye eyeshadow palette
  • Black pencil eyeliner
  • Black mascara

A zombie bride look is less about the outfit and more about the makeup. That being said, to achieve the bridal look you will need a white dress and a veil. To make your zombie look really come to life, cover your dress in black makeup or any product that will make it look dirty. You may also want to tear the bottom of your dress to zombiefy it. 

To make your zombie bride come alive, begin by smoothing moisturiser into your face. Add the lightest shade of foundation that you can find on top of your moisturiser, blending it in until smooth. Once smooth, add white powder to your face, giving yourself a very pale complexion. To add to the undead look, blend a light blue eyeshadow into your makeup, giving your skin a blueish grey tone.  

Next, use a smokey eye eyeshadow palette to add colour to your eyes, cheeks, and forehead. Use a combination of purple, pink, red, and black eyeshadow underneath your eyes to make dark circles, making sure to blend the colours together with a brush. Use a black eyeshadow to highlight your cheekbones and wrinkles on your forehead, blending the lines slightly to give you a more dead-like look. 

With a black pencil eyeliner, heavily line the lids of your eyes, using your fingers to smudge the eyeliner into your skin. For added effect, use the eyeliner on your lashline, smudging that as well. This will create the effect of sunken eyes.  

Finally, finish the look by applying a heavy amount of mascara to your bottom lashes. Use your mascara brush to clump some of your lashes together, in a messy, haphazard way. 

With your dress on and makeup done, you are ready to head out into the world to find your groom… dead or alive. 

Photo by A Koolshooter from Pexels

At Laundryheap there are no tricks, only treats. Whilst you have fun creating mischief on Halloween, we will pick-up, launder, and redeliver your clothing to you. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your order today.


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Trench coat care guide

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

As we adjust to the changing autumn weather, it’s time to dig out and brush off our coats. The best way to ensure that your coat lasts the whole autumn and winter season is to properly care for it. This is your trench coat care guide

  • Always check the care label 
  • Spot clean
  • Pretreat
  • Machine wash 
  • Dry
  • Keep fresh
  • Store

Always check the care label

As with any item of clothing, before you begin caring for your trench coat you must check the care label. Checking your coats care label will inform you of what fabrics your coat is made from, whether it is safe to machine wash, what temperature you should be washing it at, and whether it is tumble dryer safe. All of this information will help you to care for your trench coat in the appropriate manner. 

Spot clean

Per season you should only be washing your coat 2-3 times. If your trench has a handful of stains, don’t immediately wash it, try and spot clean. To spot clean your trench coat dampen a soft, clean, cloth with diluted vinegar, and gently dab at each stain until it lifts. Avoid rubbing or wiping motions as this can set the stain further into your coat rather than lifting it. You should notice your stains lifting after a handful of dabs, leaving your trench coat clean and ready to wear. 

Photo by Tony Schnagl from Pexels

Pre-treat 

If you have decided that it’s time to wash your trench coat, make sure that you pre-treat any stains before putting it in the washing machine. To pre-treat your stains make a paste from equal parts vinegar and baking soda. Rub this paste into your stains using your fingers, or a soft-bristled brush, and leave it to soak for a minimum of 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, rinse the paste off with lukewarm water. If your stains persist, add two tablespoons of vinegar and two tablespoons of laundry detergent to a bucket of water and leave your trench coat to soak overnight. The mixture will penetrate the stains, lifting them and leaving your trench coat ready for the washing machine. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Machine wash

Even if your trench coat is safe to wash in the washing machine it’s best to take precautions. Before putting your coat in the washing machine turn it inside out and place it in a mesh laundry bag. This will help protect any buttons, zips, and fastenings your trench coat has. Wash your coat on a normal, warm water, cycle, using a gentle laundry detergent. Avoid washing your coat with any other items. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Dry

Once your trench coat has been washed, remove it immediately from the washing machine to limit creasing. You should avoid using your tumble dryer, or any other form of heating, to dry your trench coat, instead opting to air dry. Hang your trench coat on a wooden hanger, making sure that it is sitting on the hanger properly to avoid any stretching, and leave it to air dry in an airy open space. It may take a while for your coat to dry completely, but air drying is the best way to ensure that your coat maintains its shape and is not damaged by heat. 

Photo by Ron Lach from Pexels

Keep fresh

To keep your coat healthy it’s important to freshen it up in between washes. If you own a steam cleaner steaming your trench coat a handful of times between washes will help kill bacteria and remove any creases in your coat. To lift odours, you can spray your trench coat with fabric spray, which is perfect for not only removing smells but giving your coat a quick refresher. The final way to keep your coat looking fresh is by regularly brushing it. Gently run a soft-bristled brush over your coat in between wears to lift lint, hair, and fluff. This will ensure that your coat stays looking pristine and ready to wear at all times. 

Photo by Abdulrhman Elkady from Pexels

Store 

During the autumn and winter months make sure that you hang your trench coat up using a clothes hanger, never on a coat peg. Hanging your trench on a clothes hanger will ensure that it maintains its shape and will not stretch. You may also want to avoid hanging your trench in direct sunlight as this can sometimes make the colour fade. 

When the autumn and winter is over, wash your trench coat one last time, making sure that your pockets are empty, fold it, and store it in a cotton storage bin. This will help keep it fresh and mould free until you need it again next year. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

If you are concerned about washing your trench coat, or your coat is dry clean only, we’re here to help. Book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Travel hacks for families 

Photo by Victoria Borodinova from Pexels

Family holidays create memories that will last a lifetime. They can be incredible for family bonding and enjoying time together away from the home. That being said, they can also be incredibly stressful, so here are some hacks to take some of that stress away. 

  • Try to find family-friendly accommodation
  • Use a backpack
  • Pack spare clothes
  • Use vacuum seal bags
  • Comfort is key
  • Think about entertainment
  • Don’t forget plane sweets
  • Share the responsibility 
  • Bring some home comforts
  • Don’t forget to enjoy yourself!

Try to find family-friendly accommodation

Before you begin to contemplate travelling, think about your accommodation. Although staying in a generic hotel or renting short-stay accommodation may be cheaper, consider finding family-friendly specific accommodation. Family-friendly accommodation is built with children in mind, so there are usually additional activities available to keep your children entertained. It may be slightly pricier, but it could make your family holiday more enjoyable for everyone involved. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Use a backpack

Between checking in to your flight, getting through security, and making sure that your children are safe and happy, it will be rare to find your hands empty whilst you are at the airport, and on your holiday. Using a backpack for your carry-on rather than a travel bag will guarantee that your hands are accessible when you need them, and will guarantee that you don’t misplace or lose sight of your carry-on. 

Photo by Tatiana Syrikova from Pexels

Pack spare clothes

In your carry-on make sure that you pack a spare change of clothes for all the family. If you have young children you may already have packed a spare change of clothes for them, but make sure that you also pack spare clothes for yourself. Children can become travel sick, or could spill juice and/or food down themselves and you, so it’s always best to be prepared. Even if you just pack a change of top, it will at least help towards making everyone feel fresh once you have arrived at your holiday destination. 

Photo by William Fortunato from Pexels

Use vacuum seal bags 

There is a lot of packing involved for a family holiday. To save yourself some space in your suitcase, use vacuum seal bags. Assign each person in the family one or two bags to put all of their belonging in. Once each bag is packed, seal them shut and put them in the suitcase. Not only will this save you space, but it will also make packing, and unpacking, much easier. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Comfort is key

When deciding what to wear for traveling remember that comfort is key. All members of your family should prioritise comfort over style, so think about wearing loose-fitting clothing made from lightweight materials. These types of clothes will be easy to move in, and perfect for if you are traveling to or from a hot country. Consider packing a couple of small blankets or thick long scarves in your carry-on just in case you or the members of your family get cold whilst traveling. It’s always good to be prepared for all weather whilst on the move. 

Think about entertainment  

Children can become irritable whilst traveling, especially on particularly long journeys, so make sure that you have an ample amount of things that will entertain them. It could be their favourite toy, a tablet to watch TV and films on, or a game that can be played. Alternatively, you could entertain your children by getting them excited about the holiday.

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Don’t forget plane sweets

One of the most unpleasant things about traveling is when the airplane is taking off and landing and your ears pop. This can be disorientating for both children and adults alike, so be prepared with plane sweets. Anything that can be sucked on will help to un-pop your ears on a plane, so choose some age-appropriate sweets and have them on-hand for your flight. 

Image by William Warby

Share the responsibility 

The responsibility of traveling as a family should not land on one person. If you are traveling with another adult or with older children share the responsibility. Make a list of responsibilities before you leave and divide them between the other adult(s) and older children in your family. You could even share some of the smaller responsibilities with the younger children, such as deciding on travel entertainment or what snacks to take with you. Traveling as a family can be stressful, so sharing the responsibility will help ease that stress and ensure that everyone has a good time. 

Photo by MART PRODUCTION from Pexels

Bring some home comforts 

We all get homesick at times, and, for younger children especially, it can be scary and disorientating staying in a new location. To make the transition from home to holiday easier for them, pack some home comforts. This could be their nightlight, pillows, or favourite teddy. You don’t have to pack anything too big or difficult to travel with, just something small that will make them feel safe and at home

Photo by Alex Green from Pexels

Don’t forget to enjoy yourself 

A family holiday is for the whole family, not just the children, so don’t forget to enjoy yourself. Whilst you are away take some time out of your day to do something that you want to do. Maybe it’s reading a book on the beach, going for a swim, or taking a walk on your own. A family holiday is just as much about enjoying yourself and getting away from the stresses of everyday life, as it is enjoying time as a family. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Enjoy your family holiday without the stress of laundry. Book your Laundryheap service today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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How to make natural dyes 

Photo by Jill Burrow from Pexels

If you are interested in dying your clothes it’s best to use natural dyes. Unlike their synthetic alternatives, natural dyes do not contain harmful chemicals and usually have antimicrobial properties. This makes them a lot safer to use when dying clothing, especially for children

  • Prep
  • General method 
  • Colours 

Prep

Making natural dyes is a messy process so it’s best to do some prep before you begin. Firstly, make sure that you protect your skin and clothing by wearing an apron and gloves. As the name suggests, natural dyes will dye any clothing or skin that they come in contact with so you must protect yourself from any potential spills. To protect your surfaces from the dye, lay down plenty of newspapers or a tablecloth. Once you have successfully protected yourself and the surrounding area, you are ready to begin making your dye.

Photo by Thirdman from Pexels

General method

To make your dye, per colour, you will need…

  • 700ml of water
  • Your chosen item to create the dye from
  • Saucepan
  • Sieve
  • A bowl for each dye

To begin making your natural dye pour 700ml of water into a saucepan with the item you are going to create your dye from. Cover your pan with a lid and bring to a boil.

When your water has reached boiling point, turn off the heat and leave your pan for 10 minutes. 

After 10 minutes, strain your water into a clean bowl using a sieve. In your bowl will be your dye, ready to use on any white item of your choice. 

To use the dye, simply add your white item and leave it for as long as you want. The longer you leave your item in the dye the darker it will be. Once you are satisfied with the colour, use a pair of tongs to remove the freshly dyed item from the bowl, and gently run it under cool water to remove the excess dye. Once you are satisfied that the excess dye has been removed, transfer your item to a clean surface and leave it to dry completely. 

Photo by Teona Swift from Pexels

Colours

Purple: To make purple use half a red cabbage

Blue: To make blue use half a red cabbage to make the initial dye, and add half a teaspoon of baking powder. 

Pink: To make pink use half a red cabbage to make the initial dye, and add the juice of half a lemon.

Red: To make red use one cooked beetroot. If you would like a stronger red, use two cooked beetroots.  

Yellow: To make yellow use a thumb-sized piece of turmeric. You can use half a teaspoon of ground turmeric, however, fresh turmeric will create a more vibrant shade of yellow.

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon from Pexels

Making dye and using it to re-invent your clothing is a much more fun way to spend your time than doing laundry. Book your Laundryheap order today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to care for your dog’s clothing 

Photo by Sam Lion from Pexels

We love our dogs. They really are our best friends. That is why it is important to stay on top of cleaning and caring for their clothing. To keep them safe and looking fabulous. 

  • How often?
  • Check the care label
  • Make repairs
  • Pre-treat stains
  • Seal the garment
  • Use the right detergent
  • Dry 
  • Clean your machine

How often?

Just like humans, dog’s clothing must be washed regularly to remove bacteria and keep them looking and smelling fresh. You will find that the frequency that you wash your dog’s items will vary depending on the season. For example, you may not dress your pup as often during the spring and summer seasons so their outfits will only need to be washed once a month. In the autumn and winter months, however, you might be dressing your dog every day and therefore washing their clothing biweekly, if not weekly. 

Photo by Erik Mclean from Pexels

Check the care label

Washing your dog’s clothing is not dissimilar to washing your own. Firstly, it’s important to always read the care label. Just like with human clothing, some dog clothing will be hand wash only depending on the material it is made from. You may also find that some items can only withstand a certain heat setting on your washing machine

Photo by Sam Lion from Pexels

Make repairs 

Before washing yours dog’s garment, check for any rips or loose threads that may become worse whilst washing. Dog clothing can be incredibly expensive so it’s best to make any mends whilst they are small and manageable. 

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Pre-treat stains 

Just like with your own clothing it’s important that any stains on your pooch’s clothes are lifted prior to washing. It’s easy for your dogs items to become stained, especially when you take them for park walks, so give each item a thorough check before putting them in the machine.

To pre-treat stains, rub a small amount of heavy duty laundry detergent directly into the stain using either your fingers or a soft bristled brush. Make sure that the detergent is thoroughly worked in before putting it in your washing machine or moving on to handwashing. 

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Seal the garment

If you are machine washing your dogs clothing, make sure that all buttons, zippers, and poppers are closed. This will help prevent any snagging and loose threads becoming unravelled. You may also want to put the clothing in a mesh laundry bag to prevent any small accessories becoming detached and lost, and to manage the amount of hair that makes its way into your machine. 

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Use the right detergent 

Your dogs skin is incredibly sensitive so you must make sure that you are using the right detergent. It’s best to use a hypoallergenic detergent that does not contain perfumes and dyes- the best option is to find a detergent for babies or sensitive skin. Alternatively, you can buy pet specific detergent. 

If you notice that your pooch’s garments don’t smell particularly fresh once you have washes them, use baking soda to lift the smell. Mix a solution of two quarters of water and one cup of baking soda and leave your item to soak overnight. The next day, re-wash the clothing and you should notice the smell disappear. 

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Dry

Once you have washed your dog’s clothing, you must make sure that it is properly dry before re-dressing your pup. The best way to dry your dog’s clothing is to leave each item to air dry. This will ensure that each garment does not shrink and become tighter on your hairy friend, which is a possibility if you were to use a tumble dryer

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Clean your machine

If you are using a washing machine to wash your dog’s clothing make sure that you clean it once you are done. Your pups clothing will more than likely be hairy when it first enters the machine, and that hair will now be distributed in your washing machine. Take an hour out of your day to thoroughly clean your machine, ready for your next load of laundry

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Whilst you are taking care of your dog’s clothing, let us take care of yours. Book your Laundryheap service today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Reduce, reuse, recycle whilst doing laundry 

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One of the most effective ways to lower our carbon footprint is to reduce, reuse, and recycle the items we use. That includes when we do our laundry

  • Reduce the amount of laundry you do
  • Reduce the temperature you wash at 
  • Reuse detergent bottles 
  • Reuse dryer balls and sheets
  • Recycle containers 
  • Recycle your clothing
  • How Laundryheap is doing their bit 

Reduce the amount of laundry you do

On average a washing machine uses 350 to 500 watts of electricity per hour. The average person does two loads of laundry per week, which translates to 36,400 to 52,000 watts of electricity in just one year. By reducing the amount of laundry you do you could half your yearly electricity usage. There are several ways to reduce your laundry load, including waiting until you have a full laundry basket, spot treating stains, and freezing your jeans.

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Reduce the temperature you wash at

Washing your laundry at 60 degrees will kill bacteria, but use 40% more energy than washing at 30 degrees. You may have noticed when shopping for laundry detergent that many brands now make cold wash detergents. These are detergents that work just as effectively at 30 degrees as they do at hotter temperatures, meaning that you can reduce the temperature you wash at without affecting the cleanliness of your laundry. Be aware that if you are laundering items that are stained it is best to pre-treat them before washing at 30 degrees. 

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Reuse detergent bottles

Once you have used your laundry detergent, don’t throw your bottles away, reuse them. There are a multitude of ways that you can reuse detergent bottles, including making a watering can, a bird feeder, or weights. You can even use your empty detergent bottle to store homemade laundry detergent. Just remember that before you reuse your detergent bottles you need to make sure that they are fully rinsed out. 

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Reuse dryer balls and sheets

Dryer balls and sheets are used to reduce the drying time of your laundry, meaning that you use less energy per load. Rather than using one-use dryer balls and sheets, invest in reusable options. They may be slightly more expensive, but will save you money in the long run. To be even more environmentally conscious you can make your own dryer balls using tin foil or old clothing. 

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Recycle containers

If you don’t want to reuse your detergent bottles, make sure that you recycle them as well as your other laundry containers. Most laundry containers are made from cardboard or plastic, both of which can be recycled. Make sure that you adequately rinse and/or empty your containers before recycling them, ensuring that there is no residue left in the bottom. 

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Recycle your clothing 

It’s not just laundry containers that can be recycled, you can also recycle your clothing. If you notice that you have clothing that you don’t wear often, donate them to a local charity. This will ensure that your clothing gets rehomed rather than being added to the 92 million tons of textile waste created each year. Alternatively, if your clothing is becoming worn or ripped, you could create something new from your scraps. Whether you are an avid sewer and can create a new garment, or you simply use your ripped clothing as a cleaning rag, you can give even the most worn down piece of clothing a new life. 

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How Laundryheap is doing their bit

At Laundryheap we are dedicated to improving the way we work to be more environmentally friendly. For example, we offer our customers the option of an eco friendly route. This means that our drivers are given a wider time slot to collect and redeliver customers laundry so that orders can be grouped together and we can use less fuel. As well as our eco routes, Laundryheap also uses e-bikes in certain areas to reduce the carbon emissions emitted whilst picking up and delivering laundry.

To book your Laundryheap service simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.

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Clothing to avoid wearing to the beach

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A day at the beach is the ultimate way to relax. Lying back on the golden sand, cooling off in the glittering sea, staying refreshed with a delicious ice cream. Before heading to the beach, make sure that you are wearing the right clothing for ultimate relaxation by avoiding these items. 

  • Jeans
  • Dark colours 
  • Tight clothes
  • Expensive jewellery 
  • Shoes

Jeans

Jeans, along with any heavy clothing, should be avoided at all costs when heading to the beach. As a material, jeans are too stiff and heavy to possibly be comfortable to relax on the sand in. Wearing them will only result in your legs becoming unbearably sweaty. As well as this, you want to wear something to and from the beach that is easy to remove and put back on, not a pair of jeans that will only stick to you if you aren’t completely dry from your recent dip in the ocean. 

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Dark colours

As a rule of thumb, avoid all dark colours when heading to the beach. Dark colours absorb more heat than their lighter alternatives, making your body temperature rise rather than trying to cool it down. When you are on the beach, exposed to the sun for long periods of time, it’s best to opt for white or lighter colours as these reflect the sun.

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Tight clothes

A day at the beach should be relaxing and comfortable, something that won’t be achieved if you are wearing tight clothing. Even if you aren’t on the beach, tight clothing should be avoided when it is warm as the material clings to your body and raises your temperature. Instead, opt for light, breathable materials, such as cotton and linen, that are looser on the body and will aid in regulating your body temperature. 

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Expensive jewellery 

A dip in the sea is the perfect way to cool off from lying on the hot sand all day. Unfortunately, the salt from the water can erode gold, silver, or platinum jewellery, causing irreversible damage. Before going for a swim make sure to remove ALL of your jewellery if it is particularly sentimental. Alternatively, leave your jewellery at home so there is absolutely no risk of it being damaged or stolen whilst you are swimming. 

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Shoes

Sand is a natural exfoliator and will lift dead skin cells and smooth the soles of your feet. It is also incredibly irritating and will find its way into any small gap possible. When heading to the beach, always opt to wear flip flops or sandals rather than shoes. If you wear shoes you will be trying to get sand out of and off of them for days, maybe even weeks, after you leave the beach. If you wear sandals, you can easily shake the sand from them once your day is done. 

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Whilst you’re having fun in the sun, let us take care of your laundry. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Laundry essentials for freshers

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Going to university is exciting. For many, it marks the beginning of adult life. You are living on your own, maybe for the first time, potentially in a brand new town, city, or even country. But, amongst the excitement and fun, don’t forget about your laundry.

  • Laundry basket
  • Laundry detergent 
  • Fabric softener
  • Dryer ball/sheets
  • Colour catching sheets
  • Stain remover
  • Laundry bag 
  • Collapsable drying rack 
  • Change
  • Laundryheap

Laundry basket

A laundry basket is a basic essential. It will help you to transport your laundry from your room to the laundromat, to the washing machine, to the dryer, and back to your room. There are many different types of laundry baskets so you will definitely be able to find one within your budget. A pro freshers tip is to buy a collapsible laundry basket. It is unlikely that you will be inundated with space in your room, so a collapsible basket will help you save space. 

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Laundry detergent

You can’t do your laundry without laundry detergent. You can choose between powder, liquid, and pods, with your cheapest option being powder. When you are shopping for your laundry detergent, consider buying an antibacterial detergent. 90% of freshers get freshers-flu within their first term at university, and antibacterial laundry detergent will ensure that your clothing is both clean and disinfected. 

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Fabric softener 

Fabric softener will maintain the softness of your clothing and make your garments smell amazing. If you have sensitive skin, fabric softener can help with irritation as it smooths the fibres in your clothing, making them less abrasive against your skin. Simply add a capful of fabric softener to every load of your laundry and your clothes will smell and feel divine for weeks. 

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Dryer balls/sheets

Investing in dryer balls/sheets could save you a small fortune. Dryer balls and sheets can be added to your tumble dryer to reduce drying time and limit the static on your clothing. Simply add 2-3 balls or sheets to each load and your drying time will be cut by at least 10%. This may not seem like a huge amount of time, but when you are paying to use a dryer per minute/hour, 10% could end up saving you a lot of money.

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Colour catching sheets

To maintain the colour and quality of your clothing it’s always best to wash your colours and whites separately. That being said, when you are a student, paying to use a washing machine per load, exceptions can be made. Buy yourself a box of colour catching sheets and save yourself the hassle of separating your laundry and paying to use the washing machine twice. These sheets will catch any colour runs, and prevent your whites from turning grey. 

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Stain remover 

Whether you are a fresher or not, stain remover is always useful to have in your cupboard. Stain remover is great for pre-treating tough stains or adding to your washing machine to lift smaller, fresher, stains. If you do stain your clothing and don’t have any stain remover, you can use alternatives such as lemon juice and baking soda. 

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Laundry bag

When you do your laundry you may notice that your socks go into the machine in a pair, but come out single. Do not risk losing your socks and instead buy a laundry bag. These small bags are the perfect size for washing your socks and will guarantee that you never lose one again. Laundry bags are also incredibly useful when washing delicate underwear. 

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Collapsible drying rack 

It is not guaranteed that your laundromat will have tumble dryers, and you may also not want to pay to use one. If either of these scenarios is the case, you may want to invest in a collapsible drying rack. These racks are perfect for hanging your clothes on in the comfort of your own room. Simply fold it out, hang your clothes, and leave them for a day or two to dry. Once your clothes are dry, simply fold your rack away and store it somewhere safe. It may take slightly longer for your clothing to dry this way, but you will save yourself money and your drying rack will not take up unnecessary space. 

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Change

When using a laundromat it is essential that you have change with you. Some laundromats do accept card payments, however, it is not always guaranteed. Stay prepared by always taking a small amount of change with you when you go to the laundromat. That way, regardless of whether your laundromat accepts cards or not, you are guaranteed to have clean laundry at the end of the day. 

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Laundryheap

Nobody enjoys doing laundry, and you shouldn’t let the chore take away from your fresher’s experience. If you live in student accommodation and want a helping hand with your laundry, head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to make your booking today. Use the code STDNT7 for 7% off of your first order.

Enjoy your freshers!