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Solo travel hacks 

Photo by S Migaj from Pexels

Solo travelling is one of the most unique experiences you can have. You can go on an adventure, doing the things that you want to do, and exploring the things that you want to explore. If you are travelling solo, these hacks will help you on your journey. 

  • Research 
  • Have a rough plan 
  • Pack light
  • Take home comforts 
  • You are your own entertainment 
  • Don’t forget your phone
  • Keep cash on hand 
  • Be friendly
  • Take advantage of free experiences 
  • Embrace the experience 

Research 

Before booking your flights, organising accommodation, and making an itinerary, it’s important to research the destination you are going to. Solo travelling, although fun, can be dangerous. You are in a foreign country, on your own, with no other person to help you if you get into trouble. That is why it’s integral to thoroughly research the country and specific location that you will be travelling to. Figure out what their laws are, how to contact the emergency services, and read about other solo travellers experiences in the country. The more information you have about the location you are visiting the safer you will be. 

Photo by Sam Lion from Pexels

Have a rough plan 

One of the joys of solo travelling is being able to do what you want without having to consult anyone else. Even if you prefer to live in the moment rather than stick to a rigorous schedule, it’s always wise to have a rough plan of what you want to do. There is so much exploring to do when you are in a different country, and you never know if you will be back there again, so making a list of things you want to see and do ensures that you don’t waste any of your time. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Pack light 

Packing is one of the hardest parts of any holiday. It’s easy to panic about what you need, overpack, and end up having to lug around a heavy suitcase for the duration of your holiday. When you are solo travelling, you must remember that you are responsible for your own bag, meaning that you will have to carry it around regardless of how heavy it is. Be brutal whilst you are packing and only pack your essentials. Make a list of what you need, and stick to it, or risk having aching hands on your holiday.

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Take home comforts 

As incredible as solo travelling is, it can get lonely. When packing, slip a couple of small home comforts into your suitcase for moments when you may feel alone. These could be photographs, a candle, a teddy, or even a special pillow. Whatever it is that makes you feel comfortable, pack it. You don’t want feeling homesick ruining your holiday. 

Photo by Ivan Samkov from Pexels

You are your own entertainment 

When you are travelling with other people you can rely on them for entertainment, but when you are travelling on your own, you are your own entertainment. Take this opportunity of being on your own to read that book you’ve been meaning to, or finish that series. You won’t want to be otherwise occupied when you reach your destination, but you will need to entertain yourself somehow on the journey there and back.

Photo by Berkalp Turper from Pexels

Don’t forget your phone 

Solo travel is a great time to go off the grid, escape from your usual routine and have an adventure. That being said, it is important that you keep your phone on you, fully charged, and with the appropriate sim card. Your phone is handy to have for 2 reasons. Firstly, you will want to remember the adventure you have been on and you can use your phone to take pictures and videos. Secondly, if you find yourself in trouble you may need your phone to get in contact with the emergency services or a relative or friend. You may not need your phone whilst you are away, but it’s always best to have it on hand just in case. 

Photo by Julia Volk from Pexels

Keep cash on hand 

Although most places accept card payments it’s always best to have a small amount of cash on hand. This, similarly to having your phone with you, is just in case of an emergency. You never know when you will need cash, so it’s wise to get a small amount out before you leave. As well as this, some places you visit on your travels may not take cards so it’s best to have cash for buying food, drinks, and any souvenirs you may want to pick up along the way. 

Photo by Artem Beliaikin from Pexels

Be friendly 

Solo travelling is a great way to meet new people, both locals and fellow travellers. Whilst you are wandering around, don’t be afraid to speak to people. Ask locals for suggestions on what to do, where to eat, or where to get a drink. Speak to fellow travellers about their holiday experience so far. Being friendly is the best way to begin speaking to people, and you never know, you may find yourself meeting a life long friend. 

Photo by Sam Lion from Pexels

Take advantage of free experiences 

Any form of travelling can be expensive, which is why it’s good to do as many free experiences as possible. A lot of locations will do free walking tours, which is a great way to meet fellow travellers whilst you explore your new location. Do as many free experiences as you can so that you can save your money for food, drinks, and any other experiences you want to try whilst in a new country

Photo by Julia Volk from Pexels

Embrace the experience

The most important thing to remember about solo travelling is to embrace the experience. Enjoy your time travelling alone, experiencing a new country, and taking on a new adventure. 

Photo by Rachel Claire from Pexels

Whilst you are travelling we will be doing your laundry. To book your Laundryheap order head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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How to limit your laundry load

Photo by Sarah Chai from Pexels

The less time you spend doing laundry the more time you can spend doing the things you enjoy. Limit your laundry load with these handy hacks. 

  • Sort through your clothing
  • Wait until your laundry basket is full
  • Spot clean clothing 
  • Hang towels 
  • Air clothing 
  • Know how frequently items need to be washed 
  • Treat clothes appropriately
  • Use Laundryheap 

Sort through your clothing 

The easiest way to limit your laundry load is by sorting through your clothing and getting rid of any items that you don’t wear. Ask yourself: when was the last time you wore the item? Does it still fit properly? Would you miss it if you were to get rid of it? If the clothing that you decide to get rid of is in good condition, donate it. Clearing out your clothes is a great way to limit your laundry load and help those in need. 

Photo by Liza Summer from Pexels

Wait until your laundry basket is full 

It can be tempting to wash your clothes as soon as there are a few items in your laundry basket. This, however, will only lead to a constant cycle of laundry. Instead, wait until your laundry basket is full. This will limit the number of times you have to do laundry in a week, or even a month, and is better for the environment. 

Photo by Tima Miroshnichenko from Pexels

Spot clean clothing 

If your garment has a small stain or mark on it, don’t immediately throw it in the laundry, spot clean it first. Use a damp sponge to gently dab at the mark, making sure that you are not rubbing as this can set the stain further into your garment. If you notice that your mark is not lifting, try and use an alternative pre-treatment. Spot cleaning avoids the need to wash your whole garment for the sake of a small stain. 

Photo by Ron Lach from Pexels

Hang towels 

Towels can be used 3 times before needing to be washed. Folding towels whilst they are still damp traps moisture and encourages mould to grow. Instead, hang your towels in an open, airy, space, and allow them to completely dry. This will help to prevent any mould growth and will ensure that your towels can be reused before needing to be washed. 

Photo by Centre for Ageing Better from Pexels

Air clothing 

Sometimes clothing can become slightly musty, especially if they have been folded in a draw or cupboard for an extended period of time. If you notice that your clothing has taken on this stale smell, air them out rather than wash them. Hang your garments outside in the fresh air, or in an open space within your home, and allow your clothing to breathe. As the air wafts through the fibres of your clothes, it will push any bad odours out of the fabric, and leave them smelling fresh and ready to wear. 

Photo by Ron Lach from Pexels

Know how frequently items need to be washed 

Not all of your items need to be washed at the same time. For example, bedding must be washed every two months, whereas jumpers should be washed after every 5 wears. Knowing how frequently each of your washable items needs to be laundered will help you to limit the frequency that you are washing each item, therefore limiting your overall laundry load. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Treat clothes appropriately

Your clothing needs to be treated with care to ensure that it stays in good condition. This means making sure that clothing is neatly folded or hung up when dry, treating stains as soon as possible, and washing each item as stated on its care label. Treating your clothes appropriately will limit how often you need to wash each item, allowing you to spend less time doing your laundry.

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Use Laundryheap 

One of the best ways to limit your laundry load is by giving it to Laundryheap to do for you. We are an online, on-demand, laundry service, working around your schedule to deliver your fresh laundry within 24 hours. To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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A Christmas in Copenhagen

Image by Studio Sarah Lou

Copenhagen turns into a wonderland during the festive season. Twinkling lights hang above the streets, shops are filled with people completing their Christmas shopping, and the true spirit of hygge is embraced. It is a truly magical experience, and these are just 5 things to do at Christmas in Copenhagen.  

  • Frederiksberg Runddel ice rink
  • Tivoli Gardens 
  • Højbro Plads Christmas Market
  • Drink Juleøl
  • Hotel d’Angleterre 

Frederiksberg Runddel ice rink

Every winter Frederiksberg Runddel, by the entrance of the iconic Frederiksberg Garden, is transformed into a glorious ice rink. Despite not being the biggest ice rink in Copenhagen, it is one of the prettiest. As you skate around the rink you can see the tops of the parks beautiful trees and a peek into the grounds. Admission to the ice rink is free, and you can hire a pair of skates for DKK 50, or have yours sharpened for DKK 70. Skating at Frederiksberg Garden is the perfect way to begin your Christmas in Copenhagen, so get your skates on and start, well, skating. 

Image by Agent Smith

Tivoli Gardens 

Tivoli Gardens is transformed into a mesmerising winter wonderland during the festive season. The park is decorated with fake snow, glittering Christmas lights, and finished with over 1,000 Christmas trees, decorated with more than 70,000 baubles. The feeling of stepping into the North Pole would not be complete without a visit from Santa and his reindeer’s, as well as Christmas performances and parades. In addition to this magical fun, Tivoli also hosts a Christmas market with more than 60 stalls of traditional food, drink, and perfect stocking-filler gifts. Tivoli Gardens is truly a magical Christmas experience for all ages. 

Image by Alex Berger

Højbro Plads Christmas Market

There are many Christmas markets to wander around in Copenhagen, but Højbro Plads Christmas Market is the best. Located between Strøget, one of the longest pedestrian shopping streets in Europe, and the Christiansborg Palace, it is the perfect market to get your Christmas shopping done. The market area exudes the Christmas spirit with its Christmas trees, 280,000 sparkling lights, and festive decorations. Vendors sit inside log cabins, which are imported each year from Tyrol, selling Christmas gifts, sweet treats, and traditional Gløgg. Whilst you’re busy shopping and taking in the festive atmosphere, look out for Santa and his reindeer who circulate the market, greeting children and making sure that you stay on the nice list. If you don’t find all of the gifts that you are searching for at Højbro Plads Christmas Market, head to Strøget to finish the task. 

Image by Orf3us

Drink Juleøl

Juleøl is Danish for Christmas beer, one of the most beloved drinks in Copenhagen during the festive season. Traditionally, Juleøl is strong and spiced with cinnamon, orange peel, cloves, and vanilla. Today, more than 220 Danish breweries produce a record number of Christmas beers of roughly 350 varieties. From bodegas to trendy craft beer pubs, you will see Copenhagers across the city toasting the festive season with a Christmas beer. It would be remiss to be in Copenhagen during the festive period and not join in on the tradition. Cheers!

Photo by Pavel Danilyuk from Pexels

Hotel d’Angleterre

Each year the Christmas lights on the Hotel d’Angleterre are a wondrous spectacle for all to marvel at. They tend to be extravagant displays, based on characters from the iconic fairy tales of Danish author Hans Christian Andersen, who had spent Christmas in the hotel. Once you have marvelled at the beautiful lights adorning the Hotel d’Angleterre, head inside to warm yourself up with a glass of gløgg. The Hotel d’Angleterre is known across Copenhagen as the best place to enjoy a traditional glass of gløgg or their bespoke Snow Queen’s gløgg. The perfect way to get you in the Christmas spirit. 

Image by Jonas Smith

After spending your day enjoying the festive spirit, you don’t want laundry to pull you out of your festive haze. Instead, let Laundryheap do your laundry for you. Book your Laundryheap order today by heading to the Laundryheap website, or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to care for your winter warmers

Photo by Pavel Danilyuk from Pexels

It’s going to take more than just a coat to keep you warm this winter. Luckily, your trusty winter warmers are here to help. Just make sure that you look after them by following our handy guide. 

  • Hat
  • Scarf
  • Gloves

Hat 

10% of your body’s heat is lost through your head. Luckily, a warm hat will help prevent this heat from being lost. In winter, the most common type of hat to wear is a beanie, a close-fitting hat that clings to the head and can be worn over the ears. In the autumn and winter seasons, you will find yourself wearing your hat most, if not every, day, so to keep it clean it’s best to wash it 3-5 times each season. 

Machine wash 

Most beanie hats are made from polyester or wool and cotton blends, which are safe to wash in the washing machine. Before machine washing your beanie, first, check the care label. This will tell you if you can wash your hat in the washing machine and, if you can, what temperature and cycle to use. 

To machine wash your beanie, first put it in a laundry bag to prevent it from being snagged in the machine. Next, select a cool wash setting, ideally 30 degrees Celsius, and a gentle cycle. Beanies are made to be stretchy so that they can fit over your head, however, they can stretch in the washing machine and become misshapen. A gentle cycle and cool temperature will help to prevent this from happening. 

Hand wash 

If you are worried about machine washing your beanie, hand wash it instead.

To begin hand washing your beanie, first fill a sink with cool water and add a teaspoon of mild laundry detergent. Submerge your hat in the water, and gently move it around. Make sure that you are not wringing or scrubbing your beanie whilst it’s in the water as this will cause it to stretch. Gently swirl your hat in the water for roughly 5 minutes. If it is heavily stained, allow your hat to sit in the water for 15-30 minutes so that the dirt and oils can break down and be removed. 

After you have washed your beanie remove it from the detergent water and submerge it in fresh, cold, water. Swirl your hat in the fresh water until all of the detergent has been removed- you will need to replenish your water frequently until no more detergent is released. You may be tempted to hold your beanie under a stream of cool water, however, this will only result in it stretching.  

Drying 

Regardless of how you wash your beanie, the drying process is the same. Lay your beanie flat on a clean, dry, towel, and lay another clean, dry, towel over the top of it. Leave your top towel over your beanie for a few minutes to soak up as much excess water as possible, before removing it completely to finish air-drying. Do not wring or twist your beanie to remove water, or use a tumble dryer, as this will stretch and misshapen your hat. Leave your beanie to completely dry before wearing it. 

Photo by Yan Krukov from Pexels

Scarf 

A scarf is perfect for keeping your neck warm whilst you brave the brisk winter day. Most winter scarves are made from cotton, wool, or cashmere as these materials are thick and therefore better at keeping you warm. To ensure that your scarf keeps you warm throughout autumn and winter, wash it 3-5 times per season. 

Machine wash 

Washing machines are too harsh for some materials, such as wool and cashmere, so before washing your winter scarf make sure that it is made from cotton or polyester. 

After checking that your scarf is safe to machine wash, place it in a laundry bag and into your washing machine. The laundry bag will ensure that your scarf doesn’t get snagged whilst being washed. Next, select a gentle and cold water cycle on your machine. Even though your scarf’s material is safe to machine wash, it is still delicate and therefore needs to be washed using a delicate cycle. Finally, add gentle laundry detergent to your machine and begin the wash cycle. Make sure that you are using a gentle laundry detergent as they are softer on fabrics and don’t contain dyes or harsh chemicals

Hand wash 

If your scarf is made from wool, cashmere, or any other delicate material, it must be hand-washed only. 

To begin hand washing your scarf, fill a sink with cold water and add 1 tablespoon of gentle laundry detergent. Completely submerge your scarf in your detergent water and gently swish it around. You may want to gently squeeze each section of your scarf to ensure that it is absorbing as much water as possible. After you have swished your scarf in the water a few times, leave it to sit for 10 minutes, giving it ample time to soak up as much detergent as possible. 

After 10 minutes, remove your scarf from the detergent water and rinse it under a cool running tap. Make sure that your tap is on a low water pressure to avoid any damage to the fibres of your scarf. Avoid wringing or twisting your scarf whilst you are rinsing it as this can also damage its fibres. Continue to rinse your scarf under the cool running tap until no more detergent runs from it. 

Drying 

Unless your winter scarf is made from fleece, you should never use a tumble dryer to dry your scarf. Instead, lay it flat on a clean, dry, towel, and place another clean, dry, towel over the top of it. Gently press down on the top towel to remove as much excess water as possible. After removing as much water as possible, remove the top towel, and leave your scarf to air dry. If your scarf is made from cotton or polyester, you can hang it on a clothes horse or outside to continue air drying

If your scarf is made of fleece, you can dry it on a low heat setting in your tumble dryer. Make sure that you are not using a high heat setting as this will damage the fibres of your scarf. 

Photo by Arina Krasnikova from Pexels

Gloves

When your hands get cold they become stiff and achy, not a particularly pleasant feeling. Gloves keep your hands warm and mobile by insulating them. To ensure that they stay in top shape, wash your gloves roughly 3-5 times each season.   

Machine wash 

Gloves can be made from a variety of different materials, however, cotton or those made with synthetic fibres are the only ones that can be machine washed. Before machine washing your gloves, check their care label to make sure that they are safe to wash in the washing machine. 

To machine wash your gloves, first put them in a laundry bag and then into the washing machine. This will firstly ensure that your gloves don’t get snagged whilst in the machine, and secondly prevent them from getting lost. Next, select a cold and gentle wash cycle that won’t be too abrasive on the fibres of your gloves. Finally, add oxygen bleach to your wash and begin your cycle. Oxygen bleach will help keep the colour of your gloves vibrant, whilst killing any bacteria that may be on your gloves. 

Hand wash 

If your gloves are not made from cotton or synthetic fibres, then you will have to hand wash them. Not all gloves can be hand washed in the same way though. 

Leather and faux leather 

To clean your leather gloves, first use an oil-based soap to remove any stains. Gently rub the soap onto your gloves, paying extra attention to the heavily stained areas, before setting to one side to dry. 

Once your gloves have dried, use a microfiber cloth to polish your gloves. This will help keep them looking shiny. Be careful not to press too hard with your microfiber cloth as this could lead to scratching the leather of your gloves. 

Once you have cleaned the outside of your leather gloves, sprinkle a light dusting of corn-starch or baking soda inside your glove. The powdery particles will absorb any oils and odours inside your gloves, leaving them smelling good as new. Leave your corn-starch or baking soda for 15 minutes, before shaking it out of each glove. 

Wool

To hand-wash your wool gloves, begin by filling a sink with warm water and adding a drop of gentle laundry detergent. Make sure that you are only using a drop of detergent as gloves are reasonably small and don’t require a lot of detergent

Next, submerge your gloves in the detergent water and use a swishing motion to allow the detergent to soak into each glove. Leave your gloves for 10-15 minutes, before draining the detergent water and re-filling the sink with fresh, warm, water. 

Repeat the swishing motion with your gloves, removing all of the detergent from each one. You will have to refill your sink with fresh water each time it becomes too soapy. Once you have removed the detergent from your gloves, drain the water and leave your gloves at the bottom of your empty sink. Using your hands, gently push down on each glove to remove as much excess water as possible. 

Waterproof 

Waterproof gloves are often used for skiing and don’t require much cleaning. To clean your waterproof gloves, generously spray the outside of each glove with alcohol or hydrogen peroxide. This will help disinfect the outside of your gloves. To clean the inside of your gloves, sprinkle either corn-starch or baking soda into each glove and leave it for 15 minutes. The powder will work in the same way as with leather gloves, removing oils and odours. 

Drying 

Regardless of what material your gloves are made from you must avoid using the tumble dryer to dry them. Your waterproof and leather gloves won’t require drying because they have not come into contact with water. 

To dry your cotton and wool gloves place the gloves on a clean, dry, towel and roll the towel up so that the gloves are encased. This will help squeeze any excess water from each glove without causing them to lose their shape. After a few minutes, unroll the towel and rearrange your gloves so that they are lying flat. Leave your gloves in this position to air dry, refraining from wearing them until they are completely dry. 

Photo by Victoria Borodinova from Pexels

The best way to take care of your winter warmers is by letting us take care of them. We can pick up, launder, and have your hats, scarves, and gloves back to you, and ready to wear, within 24 hours. All you have to do is head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to book your order.


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You vs Technology- how clean is your house 

Photo by Tara Winstead from Pexels

It seems like robots are taking over the world. From supermarkets to hospitals, technology has never been more present in our lives than it is today. We are even inviting robots into our homes to help, or do, chores. But the question is, are these robots better at keeping our houses clean than we are?

  • Smart washing machine 
  • Robotic vacuum cleaner
  • Robotic mop
  • Robotic lawn mower
  • Self-cleaning litter box

Smart washing machine

A washing machine is a staple in any household. They ensure that clothing is clean, fresh, and bacteria-free. Smart washing machines come with the added benefit of connecting to your homes WIFI so that you can benefit from additional functions. These include, controlling your washing remotely, monitoring the progress of your washing via an app, and voice activation. Although these functions can making doing the laundry easier, they don’t improve the quality of the wash that you receive. Being able to see the progress of your laundry will help prevent leaving wet clothes sitting in the washing machine for extended periods of time, but with smart washing machines costing hundreds, sometimes even thousands, of pounds, it doesn’t seem worth it.

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Robotic vacuum cleaner 

Vacuuming is an arduous task. After a long day, the last thing you want to do is vacuum your home. But if you don’t, then you’ll be left with dust, hair, and bacteria clogging up your flooring. The robotic vacuum cleaner could be the answer to this problem. Robotic vacuum cleaners are small, often round, vacuums that use sensors and artificial intelligence to map a cleaning route around your home, so you can leave them on whilst you’re out. The only downfall to these futuristic vacuums is that they can’t reach curtains, high surfaces, or climb stairs. That being said, there is no doubt that these features are being worked on and will be hitting the shelves soon. For now though, a robotic vacuum cleaner is definitely worth buying for those busy individuals who need a little assistance when it comes to keeping their floors clean.

Photo by Kindel Media from Pexels

Robotic mop

Vacuuming is arduous, but mopping is tedious. With a similar structure and design to a robotic vacuum, robotic mops can be left on whilst you are out, so on your return your floors are spotless. What is more, because of the small design of these mops, they can reach hard-to-reach places, such as under your appliances. Although there is no doubt that a robotic mop is a useful device, they are not to be mistaken as a replacement for a normal mop. Robotic mops don’t have the power to clean big spills or undertake deep cleans, they simply prolong the time between deep cleans. If you are looking for a handy device to help keep your floors clean, then a robotic mop is definitely worth the investment, just don’t mistake it for a device that will allow you to never mop again. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Robotic lawn mower 

Mowing the lawn is the outdoors equivalent of vacuuming. So it should come as no surprise that there is a robot that can complete the task for you. Robotic lawn mowers have the same design as robotic vacuums and mops, with the addition of blades to cut the grass with. They are programmed to work on a continuous basis, so once your lawn has been cut to the length you want, your robot lawn mower will maintain that length. This leads to a healthier, thicker-looking, lawn, which is aided by the lawn mowers ability to reach hard to reach corners. This amazing invention does come at a price though, and it’s high. Robotic lawn mowers can cost thousands of pounds, however, they are much cheaper than petrol mowers because they run on electricity. If you find yourself struggling to keep up with lawn maintenance, invest in a robotic lawn mower. It will save you a life time of hassle. 

Image by Leonora (Ellie) Enking

Self-cleaning litter box

If you own a cat then you know that one of the worst jobs is cleaning the litter box. It’s never pleasant, but we do it because we love our pet. But what if you didn’t have to do it? By scooping themselves, self-cleaning litter boxes only require you to dispose of the collected waste once a week. This sounds like every cat-owners dream, in practice, however a study by the New York Times showed the underwhelming ability of these robot litter boxes. They found that the automated scoop often got stuck and therefore could not perform its purpose, the litter beds were too small for one cat let alone multiple, and that most self-cleaning litter boxes came with a short warranty. All in all, the hassle of a self-cleaning box is not worth it. Although disgusting, it’s best to stick with cleaning your cats litter tray yourself. 

Photo by AG ZN from Pexels

The advancement that we have seen in technology is mind-blowing. That being said, sometimes it’s best to get the job done by a human. We guarantee that at Laundryheap, we are 100% human, and 100% here for all of your laundry needs. To book your Laundryheap order head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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Pea coat care guide

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As we adjust to the autumn weather, it’s time to dig out and brush off our jackets. The best way to ensure that your jacket lasts the whole autumn and winter season is to properly care for it. This is your pea coat care guide

  • Remove lint, pet hair, and debris
  • Make repairs
  • Pre-wash 
  • Pre-treat 
  • Machine wash
  • Hand wash 
  • Dry

Remove lint, pet hair, and debris 

Pea coats, and coats in general, only need to be washed twice a season. To ensure that your pea coat stays in top condition between washes, remove lint, pet hair, and debris once a week. Hang your coat on a hanger, where you can clearly see it. Using a soft-bristled brush, gently brush away any debris that you can see. Then, use a lint brush to remove any lingering lint and/or pet hair. If you don’t own a lint brush, sticky tape works just as well. Make sure that you do both the front and back of your coat, not forgetting the arms as well. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Make repairs 

Rips, tears, and holes can be expected when you’re wearing a coat on a regular basis, especially if you have owned said coat for a number of years. Luckily, pea coats are often made from wool or a similar material, so any damage is easily fixed. Simply sew the damage up using a needle and thread the same colour as your jacket. Small rips and holes don’t require any special sewing skills, however, if the damage is more advanced, you may want to take it to a tailor. It’s always better to get small repairs done on a well-loved coat than buy a new one. 

Photo by Suzy Hazelwood from Pexels

Pre-wash

When the time comes to wash your pea coat, it’s important to make sure that you empty all of your pockets. You don’t want to wash your coat, only to realise that there was a tissue in your pocket that is now stuck to your coat forever. Once you have emptied your pockets, zip-up any zips and fasten any fastenings, except for buttons as this could stretch your pea coat out of shape. After you have made sure that your pockets are emptied and fastened any fastenings, your coat is ready to be washed

Pre-treat

Before you wash your pea coat, check for stains. The most important places to check for stains are the collar and cuffs of your coat. If you do find stains, simply mix a solution of mild laundry detergent and water, and gently rub this directly onto the stain. You can use your fingers or a soft-bristled brush, but be gentle to avoid damaging your coat and setting the stain further into it. Leave your pre-treatment for 15 minutes, giving it ample time to penetrate the stains. After 15 minutes, your coat will be ready to wash

Photo by Brittney Borowski from Pexels

Machine wash 

To machine wash your pea coat, first turn your coat inside out and place it in a laundry bag. This will ensure that your coat isn’t damaged in the washing machine. Set your washing machine to a delicate, cool temperature cycle. Avoid using a hot wash setting as this will damage the delicate fibres of your coat. If your washing machine has a wool-specific setting, use that rather than a delicate cycle. Finally, add a gentle laundry detergent to your machine. Make sure that you are using a gentle laundry detergent as this will dissolve any dirt on your clothing without being too harsh.

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Hand wash 

If you would prefer to hand wash your pea coat, you can do so using cold water and a gentle laundry detergent. Begin the hand washing process by filling a basin with cold water. Make sure that your water is cold and not warm or hot. Once your basin is full, add a small amount of gentle laundry detergent and completely submerge your coat. Use a gentle swishing motion to ensure that your full coat is being penetrated by the laundry detergent. Then, leave it to sit for at least 15 minutes. Once you are satisfied that your pea coat has been adequately washed, rinse it with fresh cold water, making sure that all of the detergent has been removed. After rinsing your coat do not ring it out. Instead, gently squeeze each section of your coat to remove as much excess water as possible. 

Photo by Kindel Media from Pexels

Dry

Regardless of whether you are using a washing machine or hand washing your pea coat, avoid using a tumble dryer. Using a tumble dryer can damage the delicate wool fibres of your pea coat. Instead, lay your coat flat on a clean, dry, towel, on a completely flat surface. You may be tempted to hang your coat up to dry, but this will cause your coat to sag and become misshapen. Laying it on a flat surface ensures that it keeps its shape and the fibres aren’t damaged. It can take a few days for your coat to completely dry, however, it is worth it to ensure that your pea coat stays in the best condition possible. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

If you are worried about washing your pea coat, we’re here to help. Book your coat in for a Laundryheap dry clean by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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A very merry London Christmas

Image by Kotomi_

Christmas is a magical time of the year regardless of where you are. That being said, there is something extra special about enjoying the festive period in London. If you are spending time in London this Christmas these are just some of the things that you can do.   

  • Winter Wonderland
  • Christmas lights
  • Ice skating 
  • Christmas at Kew
  • Christmas shopping 

Winter Wonderland

Winter Wonderland is one of the biggest festive attractions in London. Hosted in Hyde Park from November to January, it is the best way to get yourself into the Christmas spirit. Whether you want to skate on the UK’s largest outdoor ice rink, create an ice sculpture, wander around the Christmas markets, or take in the view from the iconic observation wheel, there is something for everyone at Winter Wonderland. 

Image by Garry Knight

Christmas lights

London is home to some of the most iconic streets and landmarks in the world, and there is no better way to see them than under twinkling Christmas lights. From Covent Garden to Oxford Street, Carnaby Street to South Bank, the city of London becomes even more magical under the glittering lights of the festive season. Don’t miss out on seeing the world-famous Christmas tree in Trafalgar Square, which has been gifted by Norway every year since 1947 as a thank you for Britain’s help in World War 2. 

Image by RussellHarryLee

Ice Skating 

Skating around an ice rink whilst warming your hands on a delectable hot chocolate, is the picture perfect festive activity. In London, there are an array of places to enjoy ice skating. As mentioned, Winter Wonderland is home to the UK’s largest outdoor ice rink, however, arguably the most iconic London ice rink is at Somerset House. On a normal day, the 18th Century courtyard of Somerset House is a wonder to explore. At Christmas, when the courtyard is transformed into a picturesque ice rink, Somerset House becomes truly magical. Complete with a 40ft Christmas tree, it really is the ice rink of dreams, and the perfect place to enjoy some festive skating. 

Image by Eagleash

Christmas at Kew 

Kew Gardens, otherwise known as the Royal Botanical Gardens, is one of the most biodiverse places on the planet. It is home to 500 acres of woodland and over 50,000 living plants. At Christmas, this biodiverse haven turns into a festive wonderland. Opened after-dark, you can walk down the magical winter trail, illuminated by stunning lights hanging from the trees. As you venture along the path you will come across wondrous tunnels of light, waterside reflections, and delicious independent street food vendors. At the end of the trail you will be treated to a panoramic light display, after which a very special festive visitor might pop by. Christmas at Kew is the perfect opportunity to wrap up warm and enjoy some festive outdoor fun. 

Image by Alex Liivet

Christmas shopping 

London has some of the best and most iconic shopping locations in the world. From Oxford Street to White City, Regents Street to Stratford, there are no end of shops ready for you to browse. That is why London is one of the best cities to do your Christmas shopping in. Whether you are looking for high-street deals or the hottest designers, you will find the perfect gift for everyone on your list. Whilst you are shopping, don’t forget to go into the iconic Liberty’s to see their famous Christmas display. 

Image by James Petts

Whilst you enjoy the festive period in London, we will take care of your laundry. Book your Laundryheap order today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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The 5 stains of Thanksgiving 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Happy Thanksgiving! Enjoy your Thanksgiving meal without worrying about stains, because we’ve got you covered with this handy guide. 

  • Turkey
  • Gravy
  • Yams
  • Pumpkin
  • Lipstick

Turkey 

Turkey is the traditional meat eaten on Thanksgiving. In fact, it is probably one of the first things you think about when you think of the holiday. If you accidentally drop a piece of turkey on your clothing, don’t panic, the oily stain left behind can easily be removed. 

To remove a turkey stain you will need…

  • Dull knife or spoon
  • Clean napkin or towel
  • Cornstarch, talcum powder, or bicarbonate of soda
  • Heavy-duty liquid detergent 

To begin removing your turkey stain use a dull knife or spoon to lift any solid bits of turkey from your clothing. Be careful not to push too hard when lifting the turkey as you could push the stain further into your garment, making it harder to remove. 

Once you have removed as much turkey as possible, use a clean napkin or towel to blot at your stain. This will soak up some of the oil and make your stain easier to lift. Make sure that you are blotting and not rubbing as rubbing will only push the stain further into your clothing

After blotting at your stain, sprinkle cornstarch, talcum powder, or bicarbonate of soda over the stained area, making sure that your stain is completely covered. Regardless of which of these powders you use, they will help to absorb any oil that you could not lift from blotting. Leave your powder for 10-15 minutes, before shaking it off. 

Next, rub a small amount of heavy-duty laundry detergent directly onto your stain. You must make sure that you are using a heavy-duty detergent as they contain the necessary enzymes to break down the oil molecules in your stain. You can use your fingers or a soft-bristled brush to work your detergent into your stain. Once you are satisfied that your detergent has been fully worked in, leave it to sit for 15 minutes. 

After 15 minutes, wash your garment as you usually would, checking that the stain has been completely lifted before drying. 

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

Gravy

You can’t possibly enjoy turkey without gravy. Be careful though, as gravy, although delicious, is easily spilt. 

To remove a gravy stain you will need…

  • Dull knife or spoon
  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent
  • Soft-bristled brush
  • All-fabric bleach (optional)

To begin removing your gravy stain use a dull knife or spoon to lift as much gravy from your clothing as possible. You may be tempted to use a cloth to rub the stain, however, this will only set it further into your garment and make it harder to remove. 

Next, cover your stain with a heavy-duty laundry detergent and use a soft-bristled brush to work it into your stain. Scrub your stain lightly with your brush, using enough effort to ensure that the stain is being penetrated by the detergent, but not enough effort to rip your garment. Once you are satisfied that your detergent has adequately covered the stain, leave your garment for 15 minutes. 

After 15 minutes, wash your clothing using the hottest setting advised on your items care label. You may also want to add a small amount of all-fabric bleach to your washing machine to lift any discolouration caused by the gravy.

Once your wash cycle has finished, check that your stain has been completely removed before drying

Image by Didriks

Yams

Yams are the perfect Thanksgiving side. They are beautifully sweet and taste wonderful when paired with gravy. If you accidentally drop some, don’t worry, a yam stain is easily removed. 

To remove a yam stain you will need…

  • Dull knife or spoon
  • Cold water
  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent

To begin removing your yam stain use a dull knife or spoon to lift as much solid yam from your clothing as possible. Try to be as gentle as possible whilst lifting your yams as you could push your stain further into your clothing, making it harder to lift. 

Immediately after lifting as much solid yam from your clothing as possible, use cold water to flush out your stain. The water will run through the stained area of your garment, pushing out as much of the stain as possible. Make sure that you are using cold water as anything hotter will only set the stain into the fibres of your clothing. 

Once you are satisfied that your stain has been adequately flushed, pour a small amount of heavy-duty laundry detergent directly onto the stained area. Work the detergent into your stain using your fingers, making sure that the whole stain is covered by detergent. Once you are satisfied that your stain has been covered, set your garment to one side for 15 minutes. During this time the detergent will penetrate your stain and begin breaking down its oily molecules. 

After 15 minutes have passed, wash your clothing as you usually would. Once your garment has completed its wash, check thoroughly to make sure that the stain has been completely removed before drying. 

Photo by Loren Biser from Pexels

Pumpkin 

After a delicious Thanksgiving meal, there’s nothing better than a delectable dessert. Pumpkin pie is one of the most popular desserts to have during Thanksgiving, and pumpkin is a likely stain to find during the holiday season. 

To remove a pumpkin stain you will need…

  • Dull knife or spoon
  • Cold water
  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent 
  • Rubbing alcohol or white vinegar 
  • White cloth or napkin

To begin removing your pumpkin stain use a dull knife or spoon to lift as much solid pumpkin from your clothing as possible. Be careful when doing this as pumpkin can be slippery and you don’t want to spread your stain to other areas of your clothing

Next, flush your stain using cold water. Before putting your stain under the water make sure that it is cold as any warmer temperature will set your stain further into your garment. Leave your garment under the water until you are satisfied that no more of your stain can be flushed out. 

Once you have removed your garment from the water, rub a small amount of heavy-duty laundry detergent into your stain. Make sure that your whole stain has been rubbed with detergent or risk only lifting part of the stain. Once you are satisfied that your whole stain has been adequately rubbed with detergent, set your garment to one side for 15 minutes. 

After 15 minutes, wash your clothing as you usually would. Once your garment has completed its wash, check to make sure that the stain has been completely removed. If the stain has not been removed, dampen a clean white cloth or napkin with rubbing alcohol or white vinegar and blot at your stain. Once you are satisfied that you won’t lift any more of your stain by blotting, rewash your garment. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Lipstick 

Thanksgiving is about sharing time with the people you love, and showing them how much you care. As such, don’t be surprised to find a lipstick stain or two pressed into your clothing by the end of the day. 

To remove a lipstick stain you will need…

  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent 
  • Oxygen-based bleach 
  • Cold water

To begin removing your lipstick stain use your fingers to rub heavy-duty laundry detergent directly into the stain. Make sure that you are covering the whole of the stained area with the detergent. Once you are satisfied that the detergent has been adequately applied to the stain, set your garment to one side for 15 minutes. 

After 15 minutes, wash your clothing as you usually would. Once your garment has been washed, check to see if the stain has been removed. 

If your lipstick stain has not been completely removed, mix a solution of oxygen-based bleach and cold water. Submerge your garment completely in the solution, and leave it to soak for 8 hours. Over the course of 8 hours, the oxygen-based bleach will penetrate the waxy stain, loosening it and making it easier to lift.  After 8 hours, remove your garment and wash as you usually would. If your lipstick stain still has not been lifted, repeat the process. 

Photo by Michelle Leman from Pexels

Thanksgiving is a time to enjoy yourself with your loved ones, not a time to be worried about laundry. Book your Laundryheap service today by heading to the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Travel hacks for couples 

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Whether its your first, second, or hundredth time travelling as a couple, make sure that it isn’t your last by following these handy travel hacks.

  • Create an itinerary together
  • Split the responsibilities
  • Use 1 suitcase 
  • But separate packing cubes
  • Share toiletries
  • Get a charger with dual ports 
  • Consider twin beds
  • Share meals
  • Always split the money
  • Enjoy your time together

Create an itinerary together

When travelling as a couple it’s important to remember that it’s not just your holiday. You may have a list of things to see and do, but so may your partner. To ensure that you both enjoy your holiday to the fullest create an itinerary together, making sure that your time is split equally between things that you both want to do. This may mean that you won’t get to see everything that you wanted to, but it’s the fairest way. 

Photo by Polina Kovaleva from Pexels

Split the responsibilities 

There is a lot to think about when travelling. Transport, accommodation, insurance, packing, the list is endless. That is why it’s best to split the responsibilities equally. You cover half of the tasks and your partner covers the other half. Not only does this mean that you are equally responsible for the holiday, but it will also mean that you get through your list of responsibilities quicker. Remember, 2 hands are always better than 1. 

Photo by Marina Leonova from Pexels

Use 1 suitcase

Arguably, the worst part of travelling is having to lug your suitcases around. When travelling in a couple, why bother with the hassle of packing 2 suitcases when you can just take 1. Between yourself and your partner, pack 1 suitcase, and take 1 backpack with essentials as a carry on. This will limit the amount of luggage weighing you down, and make travelling a lot more enjoyable for the both of you. 

Photo by Mikhail Nilov from Pexels

But separate packing cubes 

To prevent any bickering about sharing the space in 1 suitcase, assign packing cubes for yourself and your partner. To ensure that you are equally sharing the suitcase space, give yourself and your partner the same number of packing cubes, perhaps with 1 cube left for items that you can share. Not only will this help eliminate space arguments, but it is also a great way to help you be brutal with what you want to bring on your travels

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Share toiletries 

The issue with taking 1 suitcase for both you and your partner is that you have limited space. To save you both some space consider sharing toiletries. Items, such as toothpaste, shower gel, shampoo, and conditioner, can be shared between yourself and your partner, allowing you additional space for clothes, shoes, or electronics. Just make sure you that you take your own toothbrush.

Photo by Sarah Chai from Pexels

Get a charger with dual ports

Although small, another great space saving idea for travelling couples is to buy a charger with dual ports. This will allow both you and your partner to charge your electronics at the same time, without the hassle of bringing two charging plugs. In addition, having a dual port charger should prevent yourself and your partner from losing your chargers as you will both be looking after the same one. 

Photo by Steve Johnson from Pexels

Consider twin beds

Accommodation can be incredibly expensive when travelling, especially as a couple. Although you probably want to share a bed with your partner whilst on holiday, you may want to consider paying for a twin room rather than a double. On average, twin rooms are less expensive than their double alternative, so it may be an easy way to save yourself and your partner money. Once you are in the room, you can easily push your beds together to form a makeshift double. 

Photo by A Koolshooter from Pexels

Share meals  

Another great way for couples to save money whilst travelling is to share meals. If you find that you and your partner aren’t often finishing your full meal, it may be a good idea to share one main meal with a selection of sides. Not only will this save you money, it will also prevent food waste. 

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Always split the money 

Regardless of whether you are using cards or physical cash, it’s important to split the money equally between both you and your partner. You never know what can happen whilst travelling, so splitting the money equally ensures that you will always have some money with you regardless of if any gets lost or stolen. 

Enjoy your time together 

The most important things to remember when travelling with your partner is to enjoy your time together. Enjoy being on holiday, alone, with no interruptions. It may be hard to find moments like that when you get back to your normal lives. 

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Whilst you enjoy travelling with your significant other, we’ll take care of your laundry. Book your Laundryheap order today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.


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Top areas to stay in Dublin

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There are plenty of beautiful areas to stay in Dublin, but these are our top 5 picks.

  • Grafton Street
  • Merrion Square
  • Portobello
  • Smithfield 
  • The Docklands 

Grafton Street 

If you enjoy a spot of retail therapy, than Grafton Street is the ideal place for you to stay. As one of Europe’s busiest shopping streets, you will find almost every popular shop you would ever want. Nestled between the abundance of shops are independent cafes, restaurants, and pubs, ready to welcome you inside. When/if you are ready to escape the hustle and bustle of the street, St Stephen’s Green is located at the top of Grafton Street. An idyllic 22 acre park of lush gardens, blooming flower beds, and beautiful sculptures. If you are looking to stay in the centre of Dublin’s hustle and bustle, with the opportunity for peacefulness, than Grafton Street is the perfect place for you to stay. 

Photo by Lukas Kloeppel from Pexels

Merrion Square

Merrion Square is perfect for those who like a slower pace. Those who are creative and artsy, who enjoy observing their surroundings. The square is one of Dublin’s grandest squares. Georgian houses line 3 sides of the square and the other homes 2 museums and the garden of Leinster House, the seat of Irish Parliament. Merrion Square was once home to some of the worlds most renowned artists, including Oscar Wilde and WB Yeats. Holding on to its historic past of artistic greatness, the square hosts various events throughout the year where artists will hang their paintings for people to buy. Merrion Square is beautiful area of Dublin, rich in history and home to some of Dublin’s biggest sites, including The National Gallery. Additionally, it is only a 10 minute walk from Grafton Street, so you can experience the hustle and bustle of Dublin in mere minutes. 

Image by Pastor Sam

Portobello 

Portobello is Dublin’s up-and-coming area. It’s where Dubliners come to meet and where the iconic playwright George Bernard Shaw was born. Portobello is the perfect place to stay for those who are looking for something different. Away from the commercial high streets, Portobello is overflowing with innovative restaurants, contemporary galleries, and unique bric-a-brac boutiques. As you wander from shop to shop, you can take in the street art that covers almost every building, enhancing the areas quirky atmosphere. Although not home to any of Dublin’s iconic landmarks, Dublin city centre is only a 15 minute walk away. 

Image by William Murphy

Smithfield

Smithfield is located on the northside of Dublin, surrounded by the legendary Temple Bar, beautiful Phoenix Park, and lively Stoneybatter. The focal point of the area is Smithfield Square, a bustling central quarter of independent restaurants and artisan cafes. One of the most notable landmarks to be found in Smithfield is the Old Jameson Whiskey Distillery, which you can tour whilst sampling their famous whiskey. Located moments away from Phoenix Park, one of the largest enclosed parks in a European capital city, there are plenty of opportunities to enjoy relaxing in nature. Alternatively, Temple Bar is just one of the many bars you can find in and around the Smithfield area, so there are plenty of opportunities for nights out.

Image by William Murphy

The Docklands 

The Docklands are fast becoming one of the most popular locations for tourists to visit and stay whilst in Dublin. Due to the high number of businesses that operate around the area, the Docklands was once aimed solely at business travellers, but has since expanded to meet the needs of tourists. One of the highlights of staying at the Docklands is the interactive Irish Immigration Museum where visitors can learn about the rich history of Ireland and its impact on the world. There are also an abundance of restaurants and cafes where you can enjoy an eclectic selection of delicacies. The Docklands is close by to Merrion Square and the centre of Dublin, making it the perfect place to stay and enjoy a slightly quieter area, whilst still being able to enjoy the hustle and bustle of the city. 

Image by William Murphy

No matter what area of Dublin you decide to stay in, don’t let your laundry prevent you from exploring. Book your Laundryheap service today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.