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The 5 stains of Easter

Photo by Helena Lopes from Pexels

Easter is a time for celebration, spending time with family, and eating lots of chocolate. Don’t let stains get in the way of your Easter fun, use these tips for removing stains from clothing and continue having a great weekend. 

  • Chocolate 
  • Butter
  • Acrylic paint
  • Glue
  • Grass

Chocolate 

The sugar high that comes with eating copious amounts of chocolate, can easily lead to melted chocolate stained clothing. 

To remove a chocolate stain you will need…

To begin removing your stain, use a butter knife or spoon to gently scrape as much of your chocolate off of your clothing as possible. Be careful to not push too hard when doing this as you don’t want to cause rips, or spread the chocolate stain further.

After you have removed as much chocolate as possible, flush your stain with cold water. Make sure that you are using cold and not hot water because hot water will only set your chocolate stain further into your clothing. 

Once you have flushed out the stain, gently rub heavy-duty laundry detergent over the top of it. Leave your garment for 5 minutes to allow the laundry detergent to soak into the stain. After 5 minutes, soak your item in cold water for 15 minutes, gently rubbing over your stain every 3-5 minutes to loosen it. 

Finally, remove your garment from the cold water and flush your stain once more with cold water. You should notice your stain has either disappeared or is lighter in colour. If either of these options is the case, wash your item as you usually would. The wash should remove any remnants of the stain. If, after you have washed your garment your stain remains, repeat the process. 

Photo by Giftpundits.com from Pexels

Butter 

Hot cross buns are complimented perfectly when topped with a generous amount of butter. If you accidentally drop some butter on your clothing, don’t panic, simply follow these instructions. 

To remove a butter stain you will need…

  • A clean white cloth or paper towel
  • A butter knife or spoon
  • Cornstarch, baking soda, or talcum powder
  • Heavy duty liquid detergent 

If your butter stain has been caused by a blob of butter, begin the removal process by using a butter knife or spoon to gently lift as much solid butter from your clothing as possible. Be careful not to press too hard on your fabric as this can cause rips, and possibly spread the stain. 

After you have removed any solid bits of butter, use a clean white cloth, or paper towel, to gently dab the stain. Make sure that you are dabbing and not rubbing, as rubbing will cause your stain to set further into your clothing

Once you have removed as much excess oil from the stain as possible, sprinkle a generous amount of cornstarch, baking soda, or talcum powder over your stain. Allow your powder to sit on your stain for at least 15 minutes to give it an ample amount of time to absorb as much oil as possible. After 15 minutes, gently brush the powder off of your item. 

Next, add a generous helping of liquid laundry detergent to your stain, and use your fingers to gently rub it in. Leave your detergent for at least 15 minutes. 

Finally, wash your item as you usually would. If your stain has not been removed, repeat the process. 

Image by tico_24

Acrylic paint 

A fun Easter activity is painting eggs bright colours using acrylic paint. Unfortunately, acrylic paint is incredibly easy to drip on yourself. 

To remove wet acrylic paint you will need…

  • Cold water
  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent 

Wet acrylic paint acts very similarly to water-based paint, which makes it easier to remove. To begin removing your stain, place it under cold running water. The water will flush-out the acrylic paint, so leave your garment under the running water until it begins to run clear. 

Once you are satisfied that your stain has been sufficiently flushed-out, place an ample amount of heavy-duty laundry detergent over your stain and leave it for 15 minutes. Your laundry detergent will lift any remaining acrylic paint. 

Finally, wash your item as you usually would. When taking your stained garment out of the washing machine, make sure to check that the stain has been completely removed before drying. If your stain hasn’t been completely removed, repeat the process. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

To remove dried acrylic paint you will need… 

  • Rubbing alcohol, nail varnish remover, or alcohol-based hairspray
  • A dry, clean, white cloth or paper towel

If you leave your acrylic paint stain to dry, the paint is slightly harder to remove, but not impossible. The paint forms a plastic layer that acts similarly to an oil-based stain, meaning that flushing it out won’t be effective. 

To begin removing dried acrylic paint, apply an ample amount of rubbing alcohol, nail varnish remover, or alcohol-based hairspray to a clean white cloth and rub your stain. Before rubbing your stain, you may want to check the liquid you’re using won’t further stain your item by rubbing a small amount on an inconspicuous area. Continuously rub at your stain until you visibly begin to see it lighten in colour. 

Once you are satisfied with the lightened colour of your stain, you can proceed with the same method as removing wet acrylic paint. 

Photo by Chavdar Lungov from Pexels

Glue

Easter is a great time to get crafty. Not only can you decorate eggs, but you can make Easter baskets, Easter masks, and even an Easter pinata. Crafting is a great way to keep occupied over the Easter period but also means there is an increased risk of glue being spilled on clothes. 

To remove water-based glue you will need…

  • A butter knife or spoon
  • Cold water
  • Liquid laundry detergent 

Before you begin removing your glue stain, you need to wait for it to completely dry. You will know that it has dried when it goes clear. 

Once dried, use a butter knife or spoon to scrape off as much of the glue as possible. Don’t try and remove the whole patch of dried glue as this could cause your garment to rip. Instead, focus on removing the top, hard, layer of the stain. 

When you have removed your hard layer of glue, submerge your item in cold water for 24 hours. Make sure that your water is cold as hot water will only set the glue stain further into your clothing. The cold water will soften the remaining glue and make it easier to remove. 

After 24 hours, remove your garment from the cold water, and immediately pour a small amount of liquid laundry detergent directly onto your stain, and gently work it in with your fingers.  

Once you are satisfied that your liquid laundry detergent has been completely rubbed in, wash your garment as you usually would. If, after washing, your stain persists, repeat the process. 

To remove superglue stains you will need… 

  • A spoon or toothbrush
  • Acetone
  • Emery board or fine-grained sandpaper
  • A clean cloth or cotton wool pads
  • Laundry detergent 

As with removing water-based glue, you need to wait for your superglue stain to completely dry before beginning the removal process. Once your stain has completely dried, you can try and remove some of it using a spoon or butter knife, however, do not expect to lift much. 

Apply a small amount of acetone to a clean cloth or cotton wool pad, and gently dap your superglue stain on both sides of your garment. The acetone will break down the superglue, softening the stain and making it easier to lift from your clothing.

Once you notice the superglue becoming loose, use a dry, clean, cloth or toothbrush to gently brush away the loosened glue. You can repeat the acetone and brushing process as many times as necessary to remove the majority of your stain. 

If you notice that your stain is being particularly stubborn, you can use an emery board or fine-grained sandpaper to gently wear it down. Be very careful when doing this, as you want to lift the glue without damaging your clothes fibers. 

Finally, wash your garment as you usually would, checking that your stain has been completely lifted before drying it. If your stain has not been lifted, repeat the process. 

Photo by Erika Pugliese from Pexels

Grass

Whether you’re enjoying an Easter egg hunt in the garden or playing some Easter-themed sports, grass stains are inevitable when it comes to Easter fun. 

To remove grass stains you will need…

  • Cold water
  • Laundry detergent 
  • Rubbing alcohol (optional)
  • Hairspray (optional)

Begin the grass stain removal process by soaking your garment in cold water for 15 minutes. The cold water will soften the stain, and make it easier to lift. Make sure that your water is cold, as hot water will only set the stain further into your clothing. 

After 15 minutes, use your hands to rub laundry detergent directly onto your stain. You can use liquid detergent for this, however, powder detergent is particularly effective at removing stubborn outdoor stains.

Once you are satisfied that you have adequately rubbed your detergent into the stain, wash your item as you usually would. 

If your stain has not been completely lifted after washing, you may want to consider repeating the process or using rubbing alcohol or hairspray on your stain. The alcohol found in these products breaks down the green pigments in grass stains

If you are using rubbing alcohol, dab a small amount onto a clean cloth, and gently sponge it over your stain. When you see the colour lifting, rinse your garment in cold water and continue with the usual removal process. 

To use hairspray, spray a liberal amount over your stain and wait for it to completely dry. Once it has dried, used a soft-bristled brush, such as a toothbrush, to scrub at your stain. When you notice the colour begin to fade, flush out the hairspray with cold water, and continue with the usual stain removal process. 

Photo by Matthias Cooper from Pexels

Easter is supposed to be spent with friends and family, not worrying about doing the laundry. Book your Laundryheap service and let us take a load off. 

To book your Laundryheap service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Top ironing tips

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Ironing can sometimes feel like a daunting task. If not done properly, you could end up damaging your clothing, sometimes beyond repair. Here are our top tips for successfully getting through your ironing.

  • Adjust your ironing board
  • Make sure your iron is clean
  • Order your clothing
  • Boil your iron water
  • Make use of the entire ironing board
  • Iron your items inside out 
  • Make sure to avoid decorative objects
  • Have DIY ironing spray on hand
  • Iron cotton garments whilst damp
  • Hang or fold your ironed clothes immediately

Adjust your ironing board 

Before you begin ironing, it’s important to first adjust the height of your ironing board. Depending on how much clothing you have to iron, you could be stood at your board for a while. Having your board too low can cause back and neck pain, so you want to make sure that it’s at a comfortable height for you. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Make sure your iron is clean

After you have adjusted your ironing board, you need to make sure that your iron is clean. To clean your iron, begin by mixing a paste of 1 tablespoon of water and 2 tablespoons of baking soda. Apply this paste to the plate of your iron, firstly making sure that it is turned off and cool before doing so. Wipe off your paste with a damp cloth. Next, dip a cotton bud in distilled water and clean your irons steam vents. Pour out any stagnant water in your iron, and re-fill the reservoir one-third full with distilled water. Turn your iron to its highest setting and steam a clean cloth for a few minutes. This will allow the water to flush out the vents of your iron. Finally, pour out any remaining water.

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Order your clothing

Before ironing your clothing, it’s important that you check each garment’s care label to evaluate what heat setting is necessary for each individual item. Once you have checked all your garments’ care labels, you can organise them by heat setting. Begin with the delicate, low heat, items as these will be the trickiest to iron, before moving on to the medium and high heat items. It’s much faster for an iron to heat up than cool down, so avoid ironing your high heat clothing first. 

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Boil your iron water 

If you live in a hard-water area, it’s best to boil your iron water before use. Hard-water can cause blockages in your iron, which can reduce its efficiency. You may also notice that if you don’t pre-boil your iron water your clothing may end up stained. 

Photo by ready made from Pexels

Make use of the entire ironing board

The average ironing board is 54 inches long, so make use of the entire length of it. If you are ironing longer items, iron them vertically down the length of the board to avoid constantly rotating your garment. If you have creases near the armholes of your t-shirts, you can use the slimmer end of your ironing board to place the top of your t-shirt over the board and gently stretch out the creases to iron over them. 

Image by Marco Verch Professional 

Iron your items inside out 

It’s always best to iron your clothing inside out, especially if your garment is a darker colour. You may notice when you don’t turn your clothing inside out, that your garments are left with a sheen or iron marks. This is due to the heat from the iron. To avoid these marks, always make sure to turn your clothing inside out before you begin ironing. 

Make sure to avoid decorative objects

It’s important to avoid ironing over decorative items on your clothing, such as sequins, embellishments, and fastenings. Not only is it unnecessary to iron over these decorative items, but it could also cause damage to your iron and/or clothing to do so. Simply iron around these items whenever possible. 

Photo by Baljit Johal from Pexels

Have DIY ironing spray on hand

Sometimes the heat from your iron is not enough to eliminate the creases in your clothing. When this is the case, you can make a DIY spray. To make your DIY spray, mix equal parts of white vinegar and water, and pour your mixture into a spray bottle. Have this mixture on hand for when you have to deal with those harsher creases. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Iron cotton garments whilst damp

If you are ironing a cotton item, it’s best to do so before your garment is completely dry. Creases in cotton can be extremely hard to get out, so, for the best result, iron your item whilst it is damp. The heat from the iron will create steam when it comes into contact with the damp material of your garment, making creases easier to fall out. 

Photo by Ryutaro Tsukata from Pexels

Hang or fold your ironed clothes immediately

Have a selection of coat hangers readily available to hang up your clothing immediately after you’ve ironed each item. You have taken the time to carefully iron each item, so you don’t want to risk creasing your garment again. If your items need to be folded rather than hung up, fold these items on a flat surface immediately after ironing, and place them away from anything that may crease or stain them. 

Photo by Kai Pilger from Pexels

You may not always have the time for ironing, and, for those days, Laundryheap is here to help. We will pick-up your ironing, iron all of your items, and re-deliver them to you, within 24 hours.

To book your Laundryheap order, simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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The ultimate guide to a perfect bed

On average, we spend 26 years of our lives sleeping, and a further 7 years trying to get to sleep. If we’re spending an average of 33 years of our lives in bed, it’s worth taking the time to make said bed perfect. 

  • How often should you wash your bedding?
  • How do you clean your duvet?
  • How do you clean your pillows?
  • How do you clean your mattress? 
  • How often should you replace your pillows?
  • How many sets of bed linen should you own?
  • How do you store unused bed linen?

How often should you wash your bedding?

As you sleep you sweat and shed skin cells. To keep your bedding adequately clean, wash your duvet cover, bed sheet, and pillow cases every 2 weeks. If you notice an increase in the amount you are sweating over night, such as in the summer months, you may want to wash your bedding every week. 

To make sure that your bedding is adequately sanitised, always check your beddings care label and use the hottest wash setting available. 

How do you clean your duvet? 

Your duvet should be washed every 6 months. How you wash your duvet depends on the material it is made from. 

If you own a synthetic duvet, use the gentle spin setting on your washing machine and add ⅓ of the detergent that you would use in a normal wash. Once your duvet has completed its cycle, leave it to completely air dry before using it again. 

Before washing a feather duvet, always check the care label to see if it is dry clean only. If your feather duvet is machine washable, use a gentle cycle and a gentle laundry detergent. Air dry your feather duvet completely before re-using it.

How do you clean your pillows?

Before washing your pillows check the care label to determine whether they are machine washable and safe to dry in a tumble dryer. 

If you can machine wash your pillows, try and wash two at a time to save on multiple loads. Always use a gentle cycle to prevent any unnecessary damage to your pillows, and only use ⅓ of the amount of laundry detergent that you would usually use. If your pillows can be tumble dried, use a low heat setting, or leave them to air dry before returning them to your bed. 

Photo by Castorly Stock from Pexels

 How do you clean your mattress? 

Regularly washing your bed linen does not deter you from cleaning your mattress. You need to clean your mattress every 6 months to remove dust mites and skin cells. 

Begin cleaning your mattress by stripping you bed linen and hoovering the surface to remove any dirt and dust. Don’t forget to hoover both sides of your mattress and around the corners- dust and dirt can linger in these areas. 

After hoovering your mattress, freshen it up by sprinkling baking soda over it. Sprinkle a generous amount over the whole of your mattress, using a soft brush or cloth to evenly spread it out. Leave it to set for 10-30 minutes before hoovering it up. This will help remove any lingering odours and body fluids from your mattress and leave it looking, and smelling, fresh.  

After removing the baking soda, leave your mattress to air out for a few hours before re-dressing your bed.

Photo by Max Vakhtbovych from Pexels

How often should you replace your pillows?

For optimum comfort you should replace synthetic pillows every 1-2 years, memory foam pillows every 2-3 years, and feather pillows every 5-10 years. 

If your pillows are causing you discomfort, have developed lumps, or are beginning to smell, it is time to replace them.

Photo by Cats Coming from Pexels

How many sets of bed linen should you have? 

As a rule of thumb, it’s good to have 3 sets of bed linen available per bed. This means that you have a set ready whilst you are washing your used set, and a spare set on hand if needed.

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

 How do you store unused bed linen?

The best way to store your bed linen is in a dry and cool environment. Make sure that your bed linen is clean and folded before storing it away. 

Photo by Tatiana Syrikova from Pexels

To ensure that your bed linen is sufficiently disinfected, book a Laundryheap dry cleaning service. To book your Laundryheap service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to remove wax from clothing

Photo by Taryn Elliott from Pexels

Wax can be incredibly difficult to remove from clothing if not dealt with appropriately. Before you try any of these methods, scrape as much wax as possible from your garment using a dull knife or spoon.

  • Iron 
  • Hairdryer 
  • Boiling water 
  • Freeze

Iron 

One of the most effective ways to remove a wax stain is to heat it with an iron.

Place a paper towel over the stain and on the underside. For extra protection, you can place a thin cloth in between your iron and the paper towel. Use a low heat setting on your iron, and press it onto the stain. This will melt your wax and allow it to drip onto your paper towel.

If your stain is on a fleece or wool garment, it is best to use blotting paper rather than paper towels as the paper may stick to your item. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Hairdryer 

If you are wary about using an iron to remove your wax, you can use a hairdryer.

In the same way as you would use the iron, place a paper towel over and under your stain. Using a hairdryer, blast hot air onto the stain, over the paper towel, for 5 seconds. After 5 seconds, blot your stain with the paper towel to aid in it’s removal from your garment. Repeat this process until your wax has been removed. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Boiling water

Before using this technique, be careful when handling boiling water. You do not want to splash yourself with the water and burn yourself. 

Begin by boiling a large kettle. Once your kettle has been boiled, carefully pour your water into a large basin or sink. Add 5-6 tablespoons of baking soda to your water and carefully stir it in. Dip your stained item into the boiling water, and leave it for 1 minute- you don’t want to leave your item for any longer as this could damage the fibres of your clothing. You may need to dip your clothing in and out of the water a few times to completely soften and remove the wax. 

Image by Scott Akerman

Freeze

If you don’t want to add heat to your clothing, do the opposite and freeze the wax off.

Put your clothing in the freezer for an hour to completely freeze the wax. After an hour, remove your clothing from the freezer and snap off your wax. If there is any wax remaining on your garment, secure the stained area over a large bowl with rubber bands, and pour boiling water over the stain. This should melt the remainder of the wax and remove it from your clothing. 

Photo by Athena from Pexels

If your wax is not lifting from your clothing, send your garment to Laundryheap. Let us know what item of clothing your stain is on, where the stain is, and we will do the rest. 

To book your Laundryheap order, head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app from the App Store or Google Play Store.


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How to clean wellies

Your wellies will help you through any cold and wet weather condition. To keep them intact, it’s important to regularly clean them.

  • General care guide for looking after your wellies 
  • Exterior
  • Soles
  • Inside 
  • Drying
  • Removing ‘blooming’

General care guide for looking after your wellies 

Before explaining how to clean your wellies, let’s begin with some general care guide tips. 

When you are not wearing your boots, keep them in a cool and dry area, standing upright with boot trees or rolled-up towels. This will help your boots maintain their strong shape. If you aren’t wearing your wellies for an extended period of time, you may also want to consider adding a sachet of cedar, lavender, or baking soda to the inside of them to keep them smelling fresh. 

Make sure that you wear socks every time you wear your boots. They will help absorb excess moisture and prevent odours and stains. 

Once you have taken your wellies off, allow them to completely air dry before wearing them again. You can speed up this process by stuffing them with dry, clean, towels or tissue paper for an hour. 

Exterior  

To maintain the flexibility and cleanliness of your wellies, you should wash them with lukewarm water after every wear to remove any mud or debris. 

If there is dried mud and debris you will need…

  • A medium bristle brush 
  • An old cloth
  • A clean cloth
  • Dish soap 
  • Warm water 

To begin cleaning your wellies, use a medium bristle brush to brush away any mud and debris. It’s best to use a circular motion to do this. To prevent getting mud and debris on your floor, complete this step on some newspaper or over the sink. 

After you have removed as much mud and debris as possible, dip an old cloth in warm water until it is damp, and wipe the exterior of your wellies. This will help you identify any mud and debris lingering on your boots. 

To remove the lingering mud and debris, mix one teaspoon of dish soap with two cups of warm water. Dip your old cloth into this solution and wipe your boot from the top to the bottom. The dish soap will help to break down the stronger mud and debris and remove it from your wellies. 

Once you are satisfied that you have removed all of the mud and debris from the exterior of your boots, wipe them down with a clean cloth dampened with lukewarm water. 

Soles

When you are cleaning the exterior of your boots it’s important that you don’t forget to clean the soles. 

To clean the soles you will need…

  • A medium bristle brush 
  • A small bristle brush, such as a toothbrush 

To begin cleaning the soles of your wellies, use a medium bristle brush to scrub the sole of your shoe. This will remove the mud and debris on the base of your sole. 

Once you are satisfied with the cleanliness of the base of your sole, use your small bristle brush to deep-clean the grooves of your sole. Use a vigorous scrubbing motion to lift the dirt from these grooves. 

Inside

If you don’t regularly clean the inside of your wellies, they will become odorous and begin to grow athlete’s foot fungus. 

To clean the inside you will need…

  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent 
  • Warm water 
  • Two clean cloths
  • Distilled white vinegar 
  • A spray bottle 

To begin cleaning the inside of your wellies, mix one teaspoon of heavy-duty laundry detergent and two cups of warm water. Soak a clean cloth in your mixture, and wipe down the entire interior of your wellies. Make sure that you reach every surface to prevent odour and bacteria growth. 

After you have wiped down the interior of your wellies, dip your second clean cloth in warm water and rinse the detergent solution away. Again, make sure that you reach every surface so that all of the detergent solution is removed from the inside of your boots.  

Next, mix a 50/50 solution of distilled white vinegar and warm water. Put this solution in a spray bottle and lightly spray the inside of your wellies. This is an added precaution to ensure that no odorous bacteria or fungi are lingering inside your wellies. 

Drying 

After you have cleaned the exterior, sole, and interior of your wellies, you need to leave them to completely dry before wearing them again. 

To dry, leave them in a cool and dry location, away from direct sunlight and heat, to air dry. It is important that they are left to air dry away from heat as this will break down their strong structure and leave them droopy. If you want to speed up the drying of your wellies, insert dry, clean, towels or tissue paper, inside your boots for one hour. This will help absorb some of the excess moisture and limit the drying time.

Removing ‘blooming’

‘Blooming’ is when a white marbled film develops on the outside of your wellies. This happens as a result of the rubber, which is a natural product, in your boots being exposed to certain temperatures, causing insoluble particles to rise to the surface. It doesn’t affect the durability of your wellies, however, it can be removed if you don’t like the cosmetic look. 

To remove ‘blooming’ you will need…

  • Olive oil 
  • A clean cloth 

To remove ‘blooming’ from your wellies, simply add a few drops of olive oil to a clean, dry, cloth and wipe it over your boots. For the best results, work from the top of your wellies down to the bottom, working on small areas at a time to ensure that every surface is covered. 

Never add the olive oil to the sole of your wellies. This will only result in the sole of your wellies becoming slippy and could result in you falling over. 

Whilst you are cleaning your wellies, we can clean your laundry. From general washing to dry cleaning and ironing, we have a service that will fit your needs.

To book your Laundryheap service head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to remove a chocolate stain

Chocolate is undoubtedly delicious, but, if on your clothes, can be difficult to remove. This is how you can remove a chocolate stain

  • New chocolate stains 
  • Old chocolate stains 
  • Dry clean only clothing

New chocolate stains

Regardless of the type of stain, it is always best to treat it as soon as possible. Chocolate stains are no different. 

To treat a new chocolate stain you will need…

  • A butter knife or spoon
  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent or dish soap
  • Stain remover gel or spray 
  • Cold water 

Begin removing your chocolate stain by using a butter knife or a spoon to remove any excess chocolate. Be careful whilst you are doing this. If you push too hard you can damage the fibres of your clothing and cause rips in the cloth. Be wary of spreading the chocolate to clean parts of your garment, you don’t want to accidentally make your stain bigger than it is. 

After you have removed as much of the excess chocolate as you can, rinse your stain with cold water. Make sure that you are running the cold water through the back of the stain so that the chocolate is pushed out through the fabric and not embedded deeper into it. Do not use warm or hot water during this step as that will only set the stain deeper into your fabric. 

Once you have flushed out your stain with cold water, gently rub a heavy-duty laundry detergent, or dish soap if you do not have laundry detergent, into the stain. Allow your stained garment to sit for 5 minutes and absorb the detergent or soap, before soaking it in cold water for 15 minutes. Whilst your stained clothing is soaking, gently rub the stained area between your fingers every 3-5 minutes to loosen the stain

Finally, using cold water, rinse out the stain, and wash your clothing as you usually would. If your stain is still present after you have washed your garment, try using a stain remover gel or spray on the stain, and repeat the previous steps. 

Old chocolate stains 

Chocolate stains will set with heat and time. If you notice a dark brown stain on an item of clothing, this could be an old chocolate stain. Despite the fact that these are harder to remove than fresh chocolate stains, it is not completely impossible. 

To treat an old chocolate stain you will need…

  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent or dish soap 
  • Cold water
  • Colour-safe non-chlorine bleach
  • Mild bleaching agent (if your stained clothing is white)

To begin removing your stain, rub some heavy-duty laundry detergent, or dish soap, directly onto the stain, and soak your garment in cold water for 30 minutes. Repeat this process until your stain becomes lighter in colour. 

Once you have completed soaking your stain, wash your garment with colour-safe non-chlorine bleach. If your stained item is white, you can use a mild bleaching agent, such as lemon juice

After your garment has been washed with your bleach, completely rinse your item, and wash it as you usually would. If your stain has not lifted, repeat the process. 

Photo by Radu Florin from Pexels

Dry clean only clothing 

If your stained item states that it is dry clean only on its care label, then seek the help of a professional dry cleaners.

When you book a Laundryheap service, simply tell us which item(s) is stained and where the stain(s) is, and we will take care of the rest. 

To book your Laundryheap service, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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How to remove hair dye stains

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Hair dye can be incredibly difficult to remove from clothing. If you have accidentally dripped some on yourself, this is how you can remove it. 

  • Before treating your stain
  • Black, brown, or blue hair dye 
  • Red hair dye

Before treating your stain

Before you begin treating your stain, check your item’s care label. If it says ‘dry-clean only’ do not treat the stain yourself. Instead, book your Laundryheap dry cleaning service and let us handle it. If your care label doesn’t say ‘dry-clean only’ you are safe to proceed. 

Black, brown, or blue hair dye

To treat your hair dye stain you will need…

  • A soft-bristled brush
  • Water
  • A basin 
  • Heavy-duty laundry detergent 
  • Oxygen-based bleach
  • Chlorine bleach (for white clothing)

Begin treating your stain by holding your garment under a cold water tap. This will help remove any hair dye lingering on the surface of your item. Make sure that you use cold water only as hot water will only aid the stain in setting further into your clothing

Next, pour a capful of heavy-duty laundry detergent over the stain and use a soft-bristled brush to gently rub it in. It’s best to use a laundry detergent with stain-lifting enzymes, so double check you are using the right detergent prior to pouring. Continue rubbing your stain for 5-15 minutes, or until you begin to see the hair dye become lighter in colour.

Once you are satisfied that your stain is a lighter colour, fill a basin with cold water and add oxygen-based bleach per the instructions on the packaging. Submerge your garment in the water and bleach mixture, making sure that the hair dye stain is completely in the water, and leave it to soak for at least 8 hours. 

After 8 hours, lift your item out of the water. If your stain has been removed, you can wash your item as you normally would. Should the stain remain, mix a fresh basin of cool water and oxygen-based bleach and leave your garment for another 8 hours. 

If your hair dye stain is on a white item of clothing and mix a solution of 1 gallon of water and 1-fourth a cup of chlorine bleach. Submerge your stained garment in this mixture, and leave it to soak for 15 minutes. Do not leave your item in the solution for any longer than 15 minutes as the chlorine bleach will begin to weaken the fabric. 

After 15 minutes, remove your item from the solution.

Removing red hair dye 

Red hair dye has a different composition than black, brown, or blue hair dye, and so the stain needs to be treated in a different way. 

To treat your hair dye stain you will need…

  • 2 soaking containers
  • Dishwashing liquid 
  • Ammonia
  • Distilled white vinegar 
  • Oxygen-based bleach 
  • Water 

As with removing black, brown, or blue hair dye, begin treatment by running your stained item under a cool water tap to remove any surface hair dye. 

Next, mix a solution of 1 quarter of water, one-half teaspoon of dishwashing liquid, and one tablespoon of ammonia, in a container. Submerge your stained garment in this solution and leave it to soak for 15 minutes. 

After 15 minutes, remove your garment from the solution and, using your fingers, rub the stained area. This will help loosen the hair dye and allow it to be removed from the fabric with greater ease. Once you have rubbed your stain for around 5-10 minutes, submerge it in the previously used solution for a further 15 minutes. 

Whilst your item is soaking, use a separate container to mix 1 quarter warm water with 1 quarter distilled white vinegar. Once your item has completed it’s 15-minute soak, rinse it well, and submerge it in your new solution. Leave your item to soak for 30 minutes. 

After 30 minutes, remove your garment from the solution. If your stain has been removed, wash your item as you usually would.

Should your stain remain, fill your sink with cold water and add oxygen-based bleach per the packet’s instructions. Submerge your stained item in the solution, and leave it to soak for 8 hours. If, after 8 hours, the stain has not been removed, repeat the process with fresh water and fresh oxygen-based bleach. 

The most effective way to remove any stain is to get it treated by a professional. When you book your Laundryheap service, let us know what item(s) of clothing is stained and where the stain(s) is located. To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to fold bed sheets

Photo by Harry Page from Pexels

Washing your bed sheets is only half the challenge of keeping your bedding fresh. Once your sheets are dried, you have to fold them- which is much easier said than done. Luckily, we have devised this instruction manual to make folding your bed sheets as easy as possible. 

  • Before you begin 
  • Fitted sheet
  • Flat sheet
  • Pillowcases 
  • Storage

Before you begin 

Prior to any folding, it’s important that you have enough room to do the task at hand. Make sure that you are in an open space, with enough room to spread out your bed sheets to their full width and length. Ideally, you need a flat surface, such as a bed or table, to lay your bed sheets on, as this will make the folding process much easier. 

Photo by Mark McCammon from Pexels

Fitted sheet 

A fitted sheet has elastic sewn around the sides so that the sheet can fit over your mattress. 

To fold your fitted sheet, begin by inserting a hand in each top corner, and turning them inside out. Then, fold your bed sheet in half lengthwise. This will turn your sheet inside out and create pockets. Make sure to tuck your elastic corners into each other to bind the sheet in place. 

At this point, you should have two corners in each hand, with the tucked seam facing you and the folded seam on the bottom. 

Next, fold your bed sheet in half, lengthwise, bringing the remaining two opposite sides together so all four corners meet. Repeat the tucking of the sides to bind the sheet in place. Your sheet should now resemble a long panel of material. 

Finally, fold your sheet three to four times until you form a square.

Photo by Castorly Stock from Pexels

Flat sheet 

A flat sheet has no elastic in it, which makes it a lot easier to fold. 

 Begin by folding your bed sheet in three or four sections lengthwise- the number of sections you choose depends on how big your sheet is. 

Next, bring the top corners of your sheet down to meet the bottom corners. From there, fold your sheet three to four times to create a square or rectangle shape. 

Photo by Anete Lusina from Pexels

Pillowcases 

Pillowcases are small and don’t have any elastic in them, so they are the easiest thing to fold. 

To fold your pillowcase, simply fold it into thirds lengthwise and fold these thirds in half to create a square. 

Storage 

Storing your bed sheets in the correct way will limit the amount of wrinkles on them. After folding your bed sheets, place them neatly in a storing cupboard that is completely dry and will not become damp at any point. If you have multiple sheets made of different materials, It is best to separate them to prevent your sheets from becoming mixed up.

When you get your bedsheets dry cleaned at Laundryheap, we will save you the hassle and fold them for you. To book your Laundryheap order, head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to remove red wine stains

Red wines natural deep red colouring is lovely to look at in a glass, but not so nice to look at on your clothing. If you have spilt red wine on yourself, this is how you can remove it. 

  • Table salt
  • Club soda
  • Soap and hydrogen peroxide
  • Kitty litter
  • Milk
  • Hot water
  • Shaving cream
  • Vodka
  • Laundryheap

Table salt 

Salt is the best stain remover for wine, but it must be used within two minutes of the wine being spilled. 

Sprinkle a thick layer of salt over your stain, making sure that it is completely covered. Leave the salt for an hour so that the salt crystals can absorb the red wine. After an hour, brush the salt off of your clothing and wash the remaining salt away with water. Your stain should be completely, or at least mostly, absorbed by the salt.

Club soda

Club soda is a popular method for removing red wine stains. The carbonation in club soda is believed to have stain lifting agents, including a low PH level which makes it a weak acid. 

To use the club soda method, simply pour the liquid continuously over the stain until you see the colour fade away. Once the colour has faded, leave your item to completely dry so that you can be sure that your stain has been completely removed. 

Soap and hydrogen peroxide

To begin this method of stain removal, mix equal parts of soap as hydrogen peroxide in a container. Depending on which you prefer, pour, sponge, or spray the mixture onto the stain, and blot with a clean paper towel or cloth. Never rub your stain as this can lead to it spreading. After a few blots, you should notice your stain begin to transfer onto your clean cloth or paper towel. Keep blotting until the stain has been completely lifted or has at least faded in colour. 

Kitty litter 

Kitty litter may seem like an odd way to lift a stain, however, it is incredibly absorbent. 

Simply sprinkle half an inch of kitty litter onto your stain, making sure that it is completely covered. Next, press down softly with your hands so that the kitty litter can begin absorbing the wine. Leave it for an hour so that it can work on absorbing the full stain. After an hour, hoover the kitty litter off of your clothing to see the end result. Your stain should be completely removed, or at least lighter in colour. 

Milk 

There are two ways that you can lift a red wine stain using milk. 

The first method is to pour the milk directly over the stain, allowing it to fully soak into the fabric, before blotting it with a clean cloth or paper towel. Your stain should be completely lifted after less than an hour. Wash your clothing as normal to remove the excess liquid. 

The second method is best if your red wine stain covers a larger surface area. Pour your milk into a large bowl and completely submerge your item into it. Leave it to soak for around an hour, before removing it from the milk and washing it as you usually would.

Hot water 

Normally, hot water sets stains into fabric rather than lifts them, however, because of red wines fruit base, hot water will help remove the stain. 

Begin by boiling water either in a pan or using a kettle. Whilst your water is boiling, in your sink stretch your stained item over a pan. Once your water has boiled, pour it over the stain from 3-4 feet above, making sure to be careful of any boiling water that may splash back at you. As you pour, you should see the colour being removed from your stain and your stain being completely lifted. Once your stain has been removed, dry the area with a clean cloth or paper towels. 

Shaving cream

Shaving cream will saturate and lift your red wine stain, even after it has dried. 

Spray your shaving cream over your stain, making sure that the whole area is covered. Next, use a spoon to flatten the cream into the fabric. Once your shaving cream has been flattened, wash your clothing as you usually would. Your stain should be completely lifted when you take your item out of the washing machine

Vodka 

If you don’t have vodka, any clear alcohol, such as gin, that has a higher proof than red wine should remove your stain.

Pour your vodka over the stain, making sure that the whole stain has been soaked in alcohol. Once your stain has been soaked, blot it with a clean cloth, before continuing to pour the vodka over the stain. Continue this process until your stain begins to fade and eventually disappears. Wash your item as usual.

Laundryheap 

If you have a red wine stain that refuses to be removed, send it to Laundryheap. Write us a note when you make your order letting us know what item the stain is on and where it is, and we will take the utmost care to remove the stain for you. 

To book your Laundryheap service, head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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Tumble dryer care guide

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

Tumble dryers are incredibly useful when you need to quickly dry your clothes. If not looked after properly, you will find that your tumble dryer may lose its ability to dry your clothes, or may even stop working completely. This care guide will help you look after your tumble dryer.

  • Clean the lint filter 
  • Empty the water tank
  • Clear the vents 
  • Clean the dryer drum 
  • Un-clog the heat exchanger

Clean the lint filter

As your clothes are spun in your tumble dryer, they release particles of fibres and fluff. The lint filter in your tumble dryer prevents these particles from clogging the airflow of the vent system. It is important to clean your tumble dryers lint filter after every use. If you don’t you can restrict the flow of air through the dryer and prevent your clothes from being sufficiently dried.

To clean your lint filter remove it from the tumble dryer and use a vacuum hose to remove the loose particles. You can find your lint filter at the front of your tumble dryer, just under the rim of your dryer’s door. To remove the rest of the particles, wash your lint filter in warm soapy water. 

You need to leave your lint filter to completely dry before putting it back in the tumble dryer. Whilst you are waiting for your filter to dry, use your vacuum hose to clear out the slot your lint filter sits in. This will help increase the airflow of your tumble dryer. 

Once your lint filter is completely dry, slot it back into the dryer, and it will be ready to use.

Empty the water tank

A tumble dryer works by rotating your wet clothes and adding heat to them to remove the water. The water that is removed from your clothing is stored in the tumble dryers water tank. Depending on the model of your machine, the water tank will be stored at the top of your machine in a drawer or at the bottom. Despite the fact that your water tank can hold the excess water from 2 loads of laundry, it’s best to empty it after every use. To drain your water, simply remove the water tank, and pour the water down the sink. You may want to give your tank a quick rinse before re-inserting it into your machine. 

Image by Peter Novotny from Pixabay

Clear the vents 

If you own a vented tumble dryer you must check the hose and vent of your machine. 

The hose of your tumble dryer takes the warm, damp, air away from the drum, and helps circulate fresh air into your machine. You should give your hose enough space to lay straight, without any kinks. If your hose has a kink it can restrict airflow and increase the time it takes for your clothes to dry. 

After checking the hose, check that your wall vent is clear of fluff and dust. If your vent is clogged it will restrict airflow and increase the amount of time it takes for your clothes to dry. To clear your vent you can use a vacuum hose to remove any loose fluff and dust. Once you have removed the loose debris, use a wet cloth to get rid of any remaining dust. This will leave your machine working at its maximum potential. 

Clean the dryer drum 

It is vital to clean the drum of your tumble dryer for two reasons. Firstly, grime and dust from your washing can linger in the drum and transfer onto other loads of laundry. Secondly, the drying sensor that monitors when your clothes are dry is located in the drum, but, if dirty, can lead to inaccurate drying times. 

To clean the drum of your tumble dryer, use a clean cloth and white vinegar to rub the drum of your dryer. Ideally, this should be done after every load, or at least after every two loads. 

Unclog the heat exchanger 

The heat exchanger in your tumble dryer turns steam from the drum back into water. Amongst the steam and air that passes through the exchanger are fibres from your clothing. Overtime these fibres build-up, which can result in a clogged heat exchanger. When your exchanger becomes clogged, it slows the flow of air through your machine, and prevents your clothes from drying. 

To unclog your heat exchanger, use your hand to remove the larger lumps of fluff. Once you’ve removed the larger sections of fluff, rinse the rest of the exchanger under the tap. Leave it to completely dry before placing back into the machine. 

Whilst your cleaning your tumble dryer, let us dry your clothes for you. You can book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app.