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How to make natural dyes 

Photo by Jill Burrow from Pexels

If you are interested in dying your clothes it’s best to use natural dyes. Unlike their synthetic alternatives, natural dyes do not contain harmful chemicals and usually have antimicrobial properties. This makes them a lot safer to use when dying clothing, especially for children

  • Prep
  • General method 
  • Colours 

Prep

Making natural dyes is a messy process so it’s best to do some prep before you begin. Firstly, make sure that you protect your skin and clothing by wearing an apron and gloves. As the name suggests, natural dyes will dye any clothing or skin that they come in contact with so you must protect yourself from any potential spills. To protect your surfaces from the dye, lay down plenty of newspapers or a tablecloth. Once you have successfully protected yourself and the surrounding area, you are ready to begin making your dye.

Photo by Thirdman from Pexels

General method

To make your dye, per colour, you will need…

  • 700ml of water
  • Your chosen item to create the dye from
  • Saucepan
  • Sieve
  • A bowl for each dye

To begin making your natural dye pour 700ml of water into a saucepan with the item you are going to create your dye from. Cover your pan with a lid and bring to a boil.

When your water has reached boiling point, turn off the heat and leave your pan for 10 minutes. 

After 10 minutes, strain your water into a clean bowl using a sieve. In your bowl will be your dye, ready to use on any white item of your choice. 

To use the dye, simply add your white item and leave it for as long as you want. The longer you leave your item in the dye the darker it will be. Once you are satisfied with the colour, use a pair of tongs to remove the freshly dyed item from the bowl, and gently run it under cool water to remove the excess dye. Once you are satisfied that the excess dye has been removed, transfer your item to a clean surface and leave it to dry completely. 

Photo by Teona Swift from Pexels

Colours

Purple: To make purple use half a red cabbage

Blue: To make blue use half a red cabbage to make the initial dye, and add half a teaspoon of baking powder. 

Pink: To make pink use half a red cabbage to make the initial dye, and add the juice of half a lemon.

Red: To make red use one cooked beetroot. If you would like a stronger red, use two cooked beetroots.  

Yellow: To make yellow use a thumb-sized piece of turmeric. You can use half a teaspoon of ground turmeric, however, fresh turmeric will create a more vibrant shade of yellow.

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon from Pexels

Making dye and using it to re-invent your clothing is a much more fun way to spend your time than doing laundry. Book your Laundryheap order today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to care for your dog’s clothing 

Photo by Sam Lion from Pexels

We love our dogs. They really are our best friends. That is why it is important to stay on top of cleaning and caring for their clothing. To keep them safe and looking fabulous. 

  • How often?
  • Check the care label
  • Make repairs
  • Pre-treat stains
  • Seal the garment
  • Use the right detergent
  • Dry 
  • Clean your machine

How often?

Just like humans, dog’s clothing must be washed regularly to remove bacteria and keep them looking and smelling fresh. You will find that the frequency that you wash your dog’s items will vary depending on the season. For example, you may not dress your pup as often during the spring and summer seasons so their outfits will only need to be washed once a month. In the autumn and winter months, however, you might be dressing your dog every day and therefore washing their clothing biweekly, if not weekly. 

Photo by Erik Mclean from Pexels

Check the care label

Washing your dog’s clothing is not dissimilar to washing your own. Firstly, it’s important to always read the care label. Just like with human clothing, some dog clothing will be hand wash only depending on the material it is made from. You may also find that some items can only withstand a certain heat setting on your washing machine

Photo by Sam Lion from Pexels

Make repairs 

Before washing yours dog’s garment, check for any rips or loose threads that may become worse whilst washing. Dog clothing can be incredibly expensive so it’s best to make any mends whilst they are small and manageable. 

Photo by Skylar Kang from Pexels

Pre-treat stains 

Just like with your own clothing it’s important that any stains on your pooch’s clothes are lifted prior to washing. It’s easy for your dogs items to become stained, especially when you take them for park walks, so give each item a thorough check before putting them in the machine.

To pre-treat stains, rub a small amount of heavy duty laundry detergent directly into the stain using either your fingers or a soft bristled brush. Make sure that the detergent is thoroughly worked in before putting it in your washing machine or moving on to handwashing. 

Photo by Eun Suk from Pexels

Seal the garment

If you are machine washing your dogs clothing, make sure that all buttons, zippers, and poppers are closed. This will help prevent any snagging and loose threads becoming unravelled. You may also want to put the clothing in a mesh laundry bag to prevent any small accessories becoming detached and lost, and to manage the amount of hair that makes its way into your machine. 

Photo by Gilberto Reyes from Pexels

Use the right detergent 

Your dogs skin is incredibly sensitive so you must make sure that you are using the right detergent. It’s best to use a hypoallergenic detergent that does not contain perfumes and dyes- the best option is to find a detergent for babies or sensitive skin. Alternatively, you can buy pet specific detergent. 

If you notice that your pooch’s garments don’t smell particularly fresh once you have washes them, use baking soda to lift the smell. Mix a solution of two quarters of water and one cup of baking soda and leave your item to soak overnight. The next day, re-wash the clothing and you should notice the smell disappear. 

Photo by mark glancy from Pexels

Dry

Once you have washed your dog’s clothing, you must make sure that it is properly dry before re-dressing your pup. The best way to dry your dog’s clothing is to leave each item to air dry. This will ensure that each garment does not shrink and become tighter on your hairy friend, which is a possibility if you were to use a tumble dryer

Photo by Skyler Ewing from Pexels

Clean your machine

If you are using a washing machine to wash your dog’s clothing make sure that you clean it once you are done. Your pups clothing will more than likely be hairy when it first enters the machine, and that hair will now be distributed in your washing machine. Take an hour out of your day to thoroughly clean your machine, ready for your next load of laundry

Photo by Erik Mclean from Pexels

Whilst you are taking care of your dog’s clothing, let us take care of yours. Book your Laundryheap service today by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Clothing to avoid wearing to the beach

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

A day at the beach is the ultimate way to relax. Lying back on the golden sand, cooling off in the glittering sea, staying refreshed with a delicious ice cream. Before heading to the beach, make sure that you are wearing the right clothing for ultimate relaxation by avoiding these items. 

  • Jeans
  • Dark colours 
  • Tight clothes
  • Expensive jewellery 
  • Shoes

Jeans

Jeans, along with any heavy clothing, should be avoided at all costs when heading to the beach. As a material, jeans are too stiff and heavy to possibly be comfortable to relax on the sand in. Wearing them will only result in your legs becoming unbearably sweaty. As well as this, you want to wear something to and from the beach that is easy to remove and put back on, not a pair of jeans that will only stick to you if you aren’t completely dry from your recent dip in the ocean. 

Photo by Mica Asato from Pexels

Dark colours

As a rule of thumb, avoid all dark colours when heading to the beach. Dark colours absorb more heat than their lighter alternatives, making your body temperature rise rather than trying to cool it down. When you are on the beach, exposed to the sun for long periods of time, it’s best to opt for white or lighter colours as these reflect the sun.

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Tight clothes

A day at the beach should be relaxing and comfortable, something that won’t be achieved if you are wearing tight clothing. Even if you aren’t on the beach, tight clothing should be avoided when it is warm as the material clings to your body and raises your temperature. Instead, opt for light, breathable materials, such as cotton and linen, that are looser on the body and will aid in regulating your body temperature. 

Photo by Artem Beliaikin from Pexels

Expensive jewellery 

A dip in the sea is the perfect way to cool off from lying on the hot sand all day. Unfortunately, the salt from the water can erode gold, silver, or platinum jewellery, causing irreversible damage. Before going for a swim make sure to remove ALL of your jewellery if it is particularly sentimental. Alternatively, leave your jewellery at home so there is absolutely no risk of it being damaged or stolen whilst you are swimming. 

Photo by Leah Kelley from Pexels

Shoes

Sand is a natural exfoliator and will lift dead skin cells and smooth the soles of your feet. It is also incredibly irritating and will find its way into any small gap possible. When heading to the beach, always opt to wear flip flops or sandals rather than shoes. If you wear shoes you will be trying to get sand out of and off of them for days, maybe even weeks, after you leave the beach. If you wear sandals, you can easily shake the sand from them once your day is done. 

Photo by Nathan J Hilton from Pexels

Whilst you’re having fun in the sun, let us take care of your laundry. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app. 


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How to tie a Windsor knot

Photo by nappy from Pexels

Whether you’re getting set for a wedding, work, or going back to school, it’s important to know how to properly tie a tie. Follow these simple steps, and you will be tying your tie in no time. 

  • Half Windsor
  • Full Windsor

Half Windsor 

The half Windsor knot is the most popular form of knot. It is a medium-sized knot that is easy to reproduce, and perfect for medium to thick ties

  1. Begin by popping the collar of your shirt, and draping your tie around your neck so that it sits below the collar. The wide end of your tie should be on your right-hand side and reach your thigh, and the smaller end on your left and reaching your rib cage. 
  2. Create an X with the two ends of your tie by crossing the wide end over the thin end. From here, loop the wide end horizontally around and behind the thin end of your tie. This should maintain the X shape. 
  3. Next, take the wide end of your tie from the top and through the opening of the X. Make sure to pull it tight. This will create the initial knot
  4. Wrap the wide end of your tie in front of the thin end from your right to your left. Then, bring the wide end towards your chest and behind the knot, forming a loop in front of your knot. 
  5. Pull the wide end of your tie through the loop you have created, making sure that you have pulled the full length of it through. 
  6. Finally, adjust your tie by pulling the knot towards the collar of your shirt whilst simultaneously pulling the thin end at the back of your tie down. Adjust your collar so that it is sitting flush with your shoulders before making improvements to your tie. Make sure that your knot is sitting at the top of your shirt, and that your tie is straight and even. 
Image by Steam Pipe Trunk Distributio

Full Windsor

The full Windsor knot is perfect for wider collared shirts. The process involves wrapping your tie twice, so a longer tie is needed for the process. 

  1. Begin by popping the collar of your shirt, and draping your tie around your neck so that it sits below the collar. Adjust your tie so that the wide end is sitting approximately 4-6 inches lower than your waistband
  2. Create an X with the two ends of your tie by crossing the wide end over the thin end. From here, tuck the wide end up and beneath the loop around your neck. It should come out and point-upwards behind the X. 
  3. Pull the wide end all the way down, before passing it behind the knot and horizontally from right to left. 
  4. Take the wide end tip, and flip it upwards, tugging it diagonally across the front of the knot. Next, loop the wide end over the top of the loop around your collar and down. It should come out on the left of the thin end. 
  5. From your left position, bring the wide end of your tie over the front of your knot to form a band. Bring the wide end of your tie underneath the loop, around the collar, and down, sliding it through the band. 
  6. Adjust your collar so that it is sitting flush with your shirt, and pull the wide end of your tie downwards until it meets the top of your shirt.
Image by Urkel-os

Keep your tie, along with the rest of your suit, looking sharp with Laundryheap. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your dry cleaning order today.


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How to dress for summer in the office

Photo by RF._.studio from Pexels

If you’re heading back to the office this summer, make sure you have these staples in your wardrobe to help beat the heat. 

  • Linen shorts
  • Linen trousers
  • Sleeveless blazer
  • Jumpsuits 
  • Cotton dress 
  • Midi skirts
  • Midi dress
  • Shirtdress
  • Wrap top
  • White shirt

Linen shorts

Shorts may seem too informal to wear to the office, but linen shorts are both cooling and look professional. Linen conducts heat, which means that the heat from your body can escape through the fabric keeping you cool. As long as the shorts you choose are tailored and an office appropriate length, then there is no reason why you shouldn’t be able to wear them. 

Image by Charlotte Powell

Linen trousers

If linen shorts aren’t for you, then try a pair of linen trousers. The linen material will work in exactly the same way as the shorts, with the only difference being the full leg. For extra coolness, try and find a wide leg trouser. 

Photo by Dellon Thomas from Pexels

Sleeveless blazer  

Blazers are a staple in any office, but in the summer, ditch the sleeves and opt for a sleeveless blazer. You will still look professional, however, the missing sleeves will keep your arms bare to the summer breeze. A sleeveless blazer can be paired effortlessly with any garment, however, to add to the look, try a co-ord. 

Photo by Canva Studio from Pexels

Jumpsuits 

Jumpsuits are perfect for all seasons because of the variety of lengths, fits, and materials you can buy them in. They are perfect for quickly throwing on and are comfortable yet professional. To remain cool during the summer, it’s best to opt for a light-weight jumpsuit made from a breathable fabric, such as cotton or linen. Looser fitting jumpsuits are always best for the summer months because you don’t have material clinging to you, making you warmer and more uncomfortable. You may also want to opt for a white or bright coloured jumpsuit as these will reflect the sun, keeping you cool. 

Cotton dress

Similarly to linen, cotton is a breathable fabric that is soft, lightweight, and soaks up sweat. Cotton dresses are ideal for summer in the office because they are lightweight and won’t cling to you, but remain professional looking. Additionally, a cotton dress can be easily transitioned from day to night, which makes it the perfect outfit for a day in the office, followed by after-work drinks. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Midi skirts 

Midi skirts have been a fashionable wardrobe staple since 2019, and are ideal for keeping cool in the office. A skirt is midi if the hem ends halfway between the knee and ankle- it has all the benefits of a shorter skirt, without having to expose your full leg. Midi skirts can be found in a variety of materials and fun patterns, which make them perfect for summer in the office. You can pair a bright midi skirt with a crisp white shirt and look professional whilst remaining cool. 

Photo by Godisable Jacob from Pexels

Midi dress

A midi dress is the alternative to a midi skirt. Similarly to a midi skirt they come in a multitude of fabrics, colours, and patterns, so you can wear something bold without looking unprofessional. There are many different cuts of midi dress, which makes them wearable for all ages and any body types. Like a jumpsuit, a lightweight midi dress is perfect for throwing on in the morning and is guaranteed to keep you cool throughout the working day. 

Photo by @thiszun (follow me on IG, FB) from Pexels

Shirt dress

Shirt dresses are another great choice of dress for staying cool in the summer. A shirt dress borrows details from a typical shirt, such as a collar, buttons, and/or cuffed sleeves, and is made from the same materials as a shirt would be, such as cotton. These dresses are ideal office wear as they have all of the professional benefits or looking like a shirt, with none of the hassle of pairing it with bottoms. Like normal shirts, shirt dresses are incredibly breathable and can be found in many different cuts, making a loose fitting style perfect for staying cool during the summer months. Additionally, shirt dresses can be found in a multitude of lengths, making them a great choice for any office worker. 

Photo by Polina Kovaleva from Pexels

Wrap top 

Wrap tops are made from two triangles of fabric which are overlapped and tied at the back or side. They come in a variety of sleeve lengths, colours, and patterns, but for staying cool in the workplace a short or three-quarter length sleeve and bright colour is preferable. You can find wrap tops in many different materials, however cotton is best for remaining cool. Pair your wrap top with a midi skirt, linen trouser, or linen short, and you won’t even break a sweat. 

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

White shirt 

The classic white shirt is an office staple and perfect for the summer. White is optimal to wear no matter what clothing you are wearing during the summer because it does not absorb heat as much as black or darker colours do. A white cotton or linen shirt will keep you cool whilst you work, and is also easy to pair with a brightly coloured skirt, linen trouser, or shorts.

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Heading back to the office can be difficult after working from home. More of your time will be spent commuting, you have to leave earlier and will get back home later, and you still have a list of household chores to deal with. Luckily, you can tick laundry off of that list, because we’ve got it covered. Book your Laundryheap order today and we will have your clothing picked up, laundered, and redelivered to you in as little as 24 hours. To book your Laundryheap order, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


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Celebrate Pride through clothing

Photo by Gotta Be Worth It from Pexels

Pride month is celebrated each year to honour the Stonewall Uprising which occurred in Manhattan in 1969. There are many ways to celebrate Pride month, and one of the easiest is through clothing. Show your support by following these simple clothing hacks. 

  • Wear Pride colours
  • Follow the rainbow 
  • Make a statement
  • Add some glitter
  • Buy from LGBTIQ+ stores
  • Or brands that support LGBTIQ+ organisations

Wear pride colours 

Pride is a colourful celebration and there are many different flags that represent the different LGBTIQ+ groups. The traditional rainbow flag, consisting of the colours red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple, was designed in 1978 by Gilbert Baker. He wanted to design a symbol for the movement that would last, and took inspiration from movements, such as the civil rights movement, to create something bold, bright, and timeless. Now, there are bisexual, pansexual, polysexual, lesbian, and asexual flags, just to name a few. Show your Pride support by wearing any of the colours, or all of them, of these flags. 

Photo by FransA from Pexels

Follow the rainbow

The rainbow has become synonymous with the LGBTIQ+ community because of its connection to their original flag, often named the rainbow flag. During Pride month it’s not unlikely to see clothing, shoes, and badges featuring the rainbow flag, in support of the celebrated month. Wear a rainbow throughout the month of June, no matter how small, to show your allyship to the LGBTIQ+ movement. 

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

Make a statement 

Pride month isn’t just about wearing bright colours and celebrating, it’s about making a statement and bringing attention to the LGBTIQ+ community. Another way to celebrate Pride via clothing is to wear a statement T-shirt or jumper. You can find many different slogans, from ‘Love is Love’, to ‘Trans Rights are Human Rights’, you simply have to search for the one that expresses most accurately what you want to say. 

Photo by Ece AK from Pexels

Add some glitter

Glitter is heavily tied to LGBTIQ+ culture, particularly the world of drag. You won’t be able to walk through a Pride parade without coming out COVERED in the stuff. Have no fear though, glitter is a fun addition to any Pride celebration outfit. Whether you wear it on your face, your outfit, or in your hair, glitter can elevate your look to the next level, whilst showing support for the LGBTIQ+ community. 

Image by Sharon McCutcheon from Pixabay

Buy from LGBTIQ+ stores

One of the best ways to celebrate Pride month through clothing is by buying from LGBTIQ+ stores. Buying from an LBGTIQ+ store is a great way to support an independent business, and show your support and allyship to the community. In addition to this, many LGBTIQ+ businesses donate part of their profits to LGBTIQ+ charities and organsiations. 

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon from Pexels

Or brands that support LGBTIQ+ organisations

You will notice around Pride month that many brands will use LGBTIQ+ colours and pledge support to the LGBTIQ+ community. Whilst this is useful at bringing attention to the community, it is not always done for the right reasons. Before buying from a company that is not run by members of the LGBTIQ+ community but pledges support to them, do a bit of research. Find out whether they truly are allys, or are simply using the month as a marketing ploy.

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon from Pexels

Don’t let laundry get in the way of celebrating Pride month, let Laundryheap sort it for you. Simply book your Laundryheap order by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Autumn fashion 2020

We may all still be spending a large amount of time at home, but that doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t look amazing whilst doing so. These are the hottest Autumn 2020 fashion trends. 

  • Brown PU leather coats
  • Neutral tones 
  • Red
  • Slouch boots
  • Tiger print
  • Pop colour bags 
  • Belted blazers
  • Knitted dresses
  • Statement earrings 
  • Capes

Brown PU leather coats 

It is vital that we protect ourselves from the harsh autumn breeze by wearing a coat. This autumn the hottest coat is brown leather PU. This understated coat comes in a range of lengths, depending on your preference, and is perfectly paired with black, grey, and blue colours. It’s the perfect coat to throw on whenever you’re feeling the autumn chill. 

Neutral tones 

Sticking with the theme of brown, neutral tones are the desired colour palette this autumn. Neutrals are a staple in every wardrobe, and this autumn you shouldn’t be afraid to mix and match your neutrals. Try pairing a sand coloured boiler suit with a camel coat, or maybe a mocha leather skirt paired with a nude jumper. The possibilities are endless when it comes to mixing neutral tones so have fun with it. 

Image by Daria Nepriakhina from Pixabay

Red

In contrast to the neutral tones that are popular this autumn, red is also a big colour. Fire engine red will quickly become your go-to shade for injecting colour into your wardrobe, specifically for your more going-out looks. Red sequins, tassels, and frills are all the range for party outfits so don’t be alarmed when you start to see red wherever you go. 

Image by 99mimimi from Pixabay

Slouch boots

Whether you’re wearing a skirt, jeans, trouser suit, or dress, a pair of slouchy boots are the perfect accompaniment. Sitting just below the knee, with every step you take your boots with scrunch and give your outfit some added texture. Try and find a pair in a warm shade of cream to elevate your looks. Whatever outfit you’re rocking these boots will give you an extra edge this autumn, whilst keeping most of your leg warm. 

Tiger print 

Animal prints are a staple favourite every season, and this autumn is no exception. This season we are going wild over tiger print. The combination of black and warm brown/orange in a funky print adheres to the warm colour palette associated with autumn, whilst adding a pop of colour to any monochrome outfit. Whether you rock a tiger print jacket, dress, or top, adding a pop of print will make any outfit look both fun and fresh.

Pop colour bags 

This autumn neutral tones will make up the majority of your outfits. That being said, it’s always good to add a pop of colour, and this autumn it will come from your bag. A pop colour bag, such as a vibrant yellow or deep blue, will break up the neutral palette of your outfit, and add an eye-catching feature. The best way to wear a pop colour bag is as a soft-leather clutch, held under your arm and close to the other items in your outfit. 

Belted blazers

In recent seasons a loose-fit has been the way to style a suit. This autumn the structured suit is back, with particular emphasis on the blazer. A belted blazer should be worn over your suit to create a more angular outfit. This trend is focused on pulling in the waist to create a more traditionally feminine hour glass look. 

Knitted dresses 

Autumn offers the perfect opportunity to get out your cosiest jumpers, and this season we’re turning that cosy jumper into a full dress. Keep your whole body warm this autumn with a full-length maxi knit dress. You will be able to find these dresses in both a tight and loose fit, with many offering a slit up the leg of one side in order to create more of a shape. Pair yours with a heavy pair of boots and your ready to stomp down any runway… or high street. 

Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

Statement earrings 

The bigger the earring the more fashionable you will be this autumn. Big, bright, bold statement earrings will be the centrepiece of your outfit. Look for gold statement earrings as they will complement the nude hues of your outfit. 

Capes

A cape is the perfect choice of outwear this autumn as it is heavy enough to keep you warm, yet light enough to not overheat you during the transition between summer and autumn. You will find a variety of different capes in varying shapes and sizes, so you will have plenty of options to choose from. This autumn checks are big, so look for a cape with a plaid pattern to stay on trend. 

Once you have selected your perfect autumn wardrobe make sure it is properly taken care of by letting us dry clean your items. Book your Laundryheap service by heading to the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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Top places to shop in Amsterdam

If you’re looking to do a little bit of retail therapy whilst in Amsterdam, these are the top 5 places to shop. 

  • De Negen Straatjes
  • PC Hooftstraat
  • Magna Plaza 
  • De Bijenkorf
  • Waterlooplein Flea Market

De Negen Straatjes 

De Negen Straatjes, or The Nine Streets, can be found in the heart of Amsterdam. As the name suggests, this shopping district is formed from nine streets that hold quaint boutiques ready to browse. De Negen Straatjes is perfect if you are looking for something a bit quirky. The streets are lined with vintage stores and boutiques that stock all manner of styles in an array of prices. The Nine Streets also come equipped with several quaint cafes that are perfect for a post-shop coffee

PC Hooftstraat

If you are looking for a more expensive shopping experience than head to PC Hooftstraat. Renowned for being Amsterdam’s most exclusive shopping street, you will find all the top designer brands on this street, including Chanel, Mulberry, and Louis Vuitton, amongst others. Located in the museum district of Amsterdam, once you’ve perused the shops of PC Hooftstraat, you can wander to the Van Gogh museum, or to one of the several restaurants located nearby. 

Magna Plaza 

Formerly the Amsterdam post office, the Magna Plaza is Amsterdam’s best-known department store. Situated across the street from the Royal Palace and Dam Square, this impressive building could not be in a better location. Spread out over three floors is every shoppers dream. From clothes to shoes, jewelry to gifts, you will find everything you need at the Magna Plaza. There is even a cheese counter where you can purchase famous Dutch cheese to take home. 

De Bijenkorf

De Bijenkorf is the perfect mixture of a department store and designer high street. It is actually a chain of high-end department stores, but the Amsterdam store was the first to open in 1870. De Bijenkorf translates to The Beehive, which is fitting as shoppers flit from floor to floor, exploring brands such as Gucci, Diesel, and Ralph Lauren. They even have a premium denim department which is said to be the best place to shop for all of your denim garments. 

Waterlooplein Flea Market 

Amsterdam is home to an abundance of open-air markets, but Waterlooplein is definitely one to check out. You will find everything at Waterlooplein- bikes, furniture, second-hand clothing, art, books, and even electronics. With such an array of objects to sift through, Waterlooplein Flea Market provides the perfect opportunity to slow down as you make your way from vendor to vendor, finding the best bargains and hidden treasures. Keep in mind that Waterlooplein Flea Market is opened every day except Sunday. 

Whilst your shopping let us take care of your laundry. Head to the Laundryheap website or download our free Laundryheap app to book your service. We are now operating in Amsterdam, The Hague, and Rotterdam. 


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Essential tips for dressing for an interview

The way that you dress for an interview will give your employer an indication of whether you are the right candidate, so here are some essential tips for dressing for an interview

  • Research the company dress code
  • Wear what makes you confident
  • Make your outfit cohesive
  • Iron out the creases
  • Pay attention to your shoes
  • Don’t forget a bag
  • Add some personality

Research the company dress code

Before planning your interview outfit you need to first establish what the dress code is. When going for an interview, it’s best to dress for the job as this shows that you are ready to begin working as soon as possible. You don’t want to turn up to your interview in the wrong attire, so do some research into the company to either find an official dress code, or get a gist of what the dress code may be.

Wear what makes you confident 

A large part of succeeding in a job interview is down to how confident you appear. If you are confident in yourself and your abilities, then you will be able to speak clearly and precisely about why you are the best candidate for the job. When dressing for a job interview, wear clothing that brings out your confidence. If wearing heels doesn’t just give you a height boost, then wear a pair of heels. If wearing a different coloured shirt brings out the most confident side of you, then don’t force yourself to wear a plain white one. Help yourself by wearing an outfit that you are comfortable and confident in. 

Make your outfit cohesive

A well put together outfit means a well put together candidate, which is more likely to equate to a job offer. When picking your outfit, make sure that it is cohesive. Make sure that you have a definitive pattern or colour scheme that is followed throughout. Don’t forget about the finer details, such as accessories and shoes, which also need to fit with whatever clothing you have chosen. If you enter your interview in a cohesive outfit you are more likely to leave with a job offer.

Iron out the creases

Once you’ve decided on your perfect interview outfit, you have to check for imperfections. This means making sure that all creases are ironed out and double-checking that there are no loose threads, snags or holes. Once you have checked and ironed your outfit, make sure that you hang it up to avoid further creasing, and make sure that it is out of reach from pets, children and anything that may cause damage or stains.

Pay attention to your shoes

When picking an interview outfit you must pay attention to all of the details, including your shoes. You need to pick a pair of shoes that you are first and foremost comfortable walking in- you don’t want to have sore feet during your interview. This being said, your shoes must also look professional, well polished and be clear of any scuffs or holes. The night before your interview, make sure to clean and polish your shoes so that you can avoid fussing over them the day of your interview. 

Don’t forget a bag

It’s important to bring a bag to your interview because you need to carry your essentials. It’s best to carry a copy of your CV, in case the interviewer hasn’t printed a copy out, a laptop or Ipad, in case you need to show a digital portfolio, your ID, for proof of who you are, and a pack of mints to ensure that you have a fresh minty breathe before your interview. Make sure that you have a bag that can comfortably fit all of these essentials, without having to squeeze. Your bag must also be clean, clear of scuffs or holes, and, preferably, a plain colour, avoidant of logos or brand names. A bag can cement a professional look together so make sure that you make a wise decision on which one to take.

Add some personality 

Despite needing to look professional and adhering to the dress code, it’s important to show who you are in the way that you dress for your job interview. Your potential employer will be looking to learn, not only about the skills that you have but about who you are as a person and how you will fit amongst their team. Don’t be afraid of adding personality to your outfit, be that in the colours you choose or an accessory.

The first thing to think about when thinking of a job interview outfit is whether it is clean or not. Don’t worry, because we have you covered. Book your Laundryheap dry cleaning slot and we will dry clean and re-deliver your perfect interview outfit straight to your door. Book your slot now by heading to the Laundryheap website or by downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


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What is fast fashion doing to the environment?

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon from Pexels

We are becoming increasingly more aware of the damage that we are doing to the environment. We know that the sea levels are rising and we know that we need to work on our carbon footprint. But, do we know the damage that our clothes are causing the environment?

  • What is fast fashion?
  • What happens to our clothes in landfill sites?
  • How do our clothes pollute water?
  • What effect are our clothes having on the carbon footprint?
  • What are our clothes doing to natural habitats?
  • How can we help our planet?

What is fast fashion?

Fast fashion is the process of designing, making, and selling clothing as quickly and cheaply as possible. When there was once a new fashion range to reflect the four seasons of the year, there are now 52 ranges to reflect every week of the year. Fast fashion is cheap to buy, but comes at the price of being made from cheap materials that only last a few wears, and, more importantly, the deterioration of our environment. 

What happens to our clothes in landfill sites? 

A western family, on average, throws away 30 kg of clothing every year. 15% of that clothing is recycled or donated and the other 85% is taken to a landfill. 72% of fast fashion clothing is made from synthetic fibres, which are non-biodegradable. It can take up to 200 years for these fibres to decompose. As our clothing decomposes methane, a greenhouse gas, is emitted into the atmosphere. The rapid pace that we are throwing away clothing, coupled with the slow rate that clothes decompose, has resulted in landfills being inundated with clothing, emitting a greenhouse gas more potent than carbon. 

How do our clothes pollute the water?

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has calculated that the fashion industry uses 1.5 trillion litres of water every year. A 2017 report stated that the average water footprint for a kilo of cotton, equivalent to one pair of jeans and a t-shirt, was 10,000-20,000 litres. This water becomes wastewater, which contains toxic substances, such as lead, mercury and arsenic. It is extremely dangerous to aquatic life and has the potential to travel to the ocean, therefore polluting the water across the globe. 

Even washing our clothes is polluting the water. One washload of polyester can release 700,000 micro-plastic fibres into the environment, and an estimated 500,000 of those fibres end up in the ocean. Although small, micro-plastic fibres are a major contributor to the micro-plastic pollution in our seas and pose a threat to the livelihoods of aquatic animals. 

What effect do our clothes have on the carbon footprint?

The UN has stated that the fashion industry consumes more energy than the aviation and shipping industries combined. In addition, The Pulse report has predicted that fashion emissions will grow by 63% by 2030. 

Fast fashion monopolises on designing, producing and selling clothing at a rapid pace. As a result of this, the industry produces 10% of the worlds carbon dioxide emissions a year amongst other greenhouse gases. Synthetic fibres, made from fossil fuels, are constantly being used in fast fashion because they are cheaper than natural fibres. This makes the production of fast fashion clothing a lot more energy-intensive. In addition, a lot of our clothing is made in countries such as China, Bangladesh and India. These countries are mostly powered by coal, the dirtiest energy in terms of carbon emissions. Buying our clothing at the rate that we currently are is heightening the use of fossil fuels and increasing global warming through intense greenhouse gas emission.

What are our clothes doing to natural habitats? 

The fast fashion industry is a massive contributor to deforestation. In fact, 70 million trees are cut down a year to make clothes. Every year, thousands of hectares of endangered forestry is cut down and replaced by plantations of trees that are grown to make wood-based fabrics such as rayon. This loss of forest is threatening ecosystems, as well as the lives of indigenous people.

As well as deforestation, the fashion industry plays a major role in the degradation of soil. Cashmere goats and sheep are specifically mass-produced for their wool, leading to over pasteurisation. In addition, cotton is sprayed with chemicals to help it to grow, which leads to soil pollution and loss of land.

Image by crustmania

How can we help our planet?

Despite the damage that has already been done to our planet, we can prevent further damage from happening. Begin by using conscious fashion brands. These are brands that use environmentally friendly processes to design, produce and manufacturer their clothing. These brands tend to be more expensive to buy from, however, use higher quality materials to create long lasting clothing. Other than this, try to buy second-hand and recycle any of your unwanted clothing.

To prevent endorsing in fast fashion, make sure that you are looking after your clothing. Book your dry cleaning slot by visiting the Laundryheap website or by downloading our free app.