Laundryheap Blog – Laundry & Dry Cleaning

Same-day collection. Free delivery in 24 hours.


Leave a comment

Tips to remove damp smells

Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

The smell of damp on your clothing means that mould or mildew is growing on the material. This can happen if your clothes are left in a dark and humid environment for too long, or if your washing machine has mould or mildew growing in it. If you notice your clothing smelling damp, try these tips to remove the smell. 

  • Hot water
  • White vinegar
  • Baking soda
  • Bleach
  • Prevention
  • Laundryheap

Hot water 

When washing damp smelling clothing, always use hot water. The hot water will not kill the mould or mildew, however the heat will help to evaporate it, thus removing it from your clothing. Before using hot water on your clothes, always check the care label

White vinegar

The acid found in white vinegar makes it an excellent way to kill mould and mildew and remove damp smells from clothing. To use white vinegar as a pre-treatment for damp clothes, mix one cup with a bucket of warm water and leave your clothing to soak for at least an hour.  Alternatively, add one or two cups of white vinegar directly to your washing machine for the same effect. 

Image by NatureFriend from Pixabay

Baking soda 

Baking soda is incredibly useful at absorbing smells and moisture from clothing, making it perfect for lifting damp smells. Simply add a quarter to half a cup of baking soda directly to your washing machine, and use the hottest temperature your clothing will allow. The baking soda will absorb the dampness in your clothing along with the horrendous smell, and leave your clothes smelling and feeling fresh. 

Image by Aqua Mechanical

Bleach

Bleach is incredibly effective at removing damp from clothing, however should only be used on white clothing. Soak your damp smelling items in one part bleach and 3 parts hot water for a minimum of 30 minutes. The bleach will penetrate your clothing, killing any mould or mildew and lifting the smell of damp. Before using bleach, you may want to test it on an unseen bit of your garment, such as the hem, to make sure that it won’t permanently stain. 

Image by Mike Mozart

Prevention

Now that you have removed the smell of damp from your clothing, here are 5 tips to help prevent mould and mildew from building up on your clothing again. 

  1. Avoid damp clothing

Never hang or fold clothing whilst it is still damp, instead, wait until it has completely dried. Storing clothing whilst it’s still damp creates the perfect damp and humid environment for mould and mildew to grow, leading to clothing smelling damp.

  1. Vaccum seal 

If you know that you won’t be wearing certain garments for a while, for example summer items during the winter, vacuum seal your clothing. This will help keep any mould or mildew out, and leave your clothing smelling fresh until you’re ready the wear them again. 

  1. Have a clear out

An overflowing wardrobe is the perfect environment for mould and mildew to grow. If you notice that your wardrobe is becoming slightly too full, it may be time for a clear out. Get rid, or vacuum seal, the clothing you don’t wear anymore, and give your everyday items room to breathe. Your clothing will thank you for it. 

  1. Clean your machine 

Your clothing may be smelling damp because your washing machine needs to be cleaned. It is vital to clean your washing machine at least once a month to avoid your clothing smelling damp, and to keep your washing machine working properly. 

  1. Reduce your detergent 

Using too much detergent in your washing machine creates a thin layer on your clothing that prevents future washes from properly penetrating your items and removing bacteria. As such, make sure that you always use the recommended amount of detergent in your washing machine. More detergent does not mean cleaner clothes. 

Photo by Ksenia Chernaya from Pexels

Laundryheap 

To guarantee that your clothing doesn’t smell damp, let Laundryheap wash them for you. We will pick up, launder, and redeliver your clothing to you, completely on your schedule. To book your order simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


Leave a comment

Packing hacks

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Packing to go on holiday can be stressful. There never seems to be enough room in your suitcase, clothing gets creased, and something always seems to spill. Try these packing hacks to avoid any further packing disasters. 

  • Take a large carry-on
  • Be sensible with your carry-on
  • Know what you’re taking
  • Take versatile clothing
  • Roll don’t fold
  • Pack shoes first
  • Utilise shoe space
  • Invest in liquid bottles
  • Ziplock bags
  • Dryer sheets in your case

Take a large carry-on 

Your carry-on is the perfect place to store any overspill from your suitcase. It’s always best to check with your airline prior to packing, however, the average size of a carry-on is 22”-14”-9”. It’s best to take the biggest carry-on you can, not just for extra clothing and holiday essentials, but for any gifts you may buy on your travels. 

Image by ivabalk from Pixabay

Be sensible with your carry-on

Not only should you be using the biggest carry-on you are allowed, but you should be using that space wisely. Your carry-on should be used as an emergency bag in case your suitcase gets lost. Make sure that you pack some clothing, essential toiletries, and any items you may need for the first 24-48 hours of your holiday. It’s terrible to think about your luggage going missing, but it’s best to be prepared. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Know what you’re taking

No matter how long you are away, it’s always best to pre-plan your outfits. This will help you to limit the amount of unnecessary clothing you pack and leave you more space for toiletries and other essentials. Make sure that you pack enough outfits to last your whole trip, but be mindful of the amount of space you have in your suitcase and carry-on.

Photo by Liza Summer from Pexels

Take versatile clothing

One of the best ways to save space when packing for a holiday is to take versatile clothing. Try and take items that can be worn every day and that can be easily transferred from day to night. Think of ways you can use accessories and shoes to dress up or dress down an outfit. 

Photo by Asad Photo Maldives from Pexels

Roll don’t fold 

Although it may feel natural to fold, always roll. Rolling your clothing will conserve precious space in your suitcase and also limit creases in your garments. You can roll items individually, or roll your outfits for each day together, it’s completely up to you, just avoid folding at all costs. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Pack shoes first 

Shoes are the most awkward item to pack. They are an awkward shape that never seem to fit properly in your suitcase, and they usually end up bent and creased. It’s best practice to pack your shoes first for two reasons. Firstly, if you have any dirt or debris on the bottom of your shoes it won’t be transferred onto your clothing. Secondly, you can fit your more pliable items, such as clothing, around your shoes, utilising the little space you have. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Utilise shoe space 

As we’ve established, shoes are an awkward shape, which means they also take up quite a lot of space. Use your shoes as extra storage for smaller items. Underwear, toiletries, and accessories are all items small enough to fit inside your shoes rather than letting them take up valuable bag space. Just make sure you spray your shoes before inserting anything into them to avoid your underwear smelling of feet. 

Photo by Lum3n from Pexels

Invest in travel bottles 

If you are storing your liquids in your carry on you will have to adhere to the 100ml’s limit per item. To help you stick to this limit, invest in travel bottles- small bottles that hold no more than 100 ml’s. You can pour your toiletries into each bottle and shake off the worry of carrying more liquid than you are allowed. What’s more, these bottles are reusable so you will have them on-hand for your next holiday.

Ziploc bags 

It can be incredibly annoying when you open your case to find the perfect accessory to finish your outfit, and you just can’t seem to find it. Never lose your accessories, and smaller items, on holiday again by storing them in a Ziploc bag. You can even store your Ziploc in one of your shoes

Image by SonnyandSandy

Dryer sheets in your case 

Keep your suitcase and its contents smelling fresh by placing a handful of dryer sheets throughout your case. They will absorb any musty smells, and ensure that you get fresh smelling clothes every day of your holiday. 

Image by trenttsd

If you run out of clothing during your holiday, don’t panic. We work internationally to ensure that our customers can have fresh and clean clothing wherever they are. To check that we service your area, and to book your Laundryheap order, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


Leave a comment

Energy-saving laundry tips

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

An average washing machine will use 350 watts of energy for one 30 minute cycle. This translates into 36,400 watts per year. There are some simple ways to save energy when doing laundry.  

  • Wash at a cooler temperature
  • Hand wash
  • Wash full loads
  • Use a high spin speed
  • Air dry clothes 
  • Don’t use timed cycles
  • Clean your dryer
  • Use dryer balls
  • Turn off your machines
  • Make sure your machines are energy efficient

Wash at a cooler temperature

Lower washing machine temperatures use less energy, and most laundry detergents work perfectly fine in temperatures of 30 degrees Celsius or cooler. There are times when you will need to use a hot wash, such as when washing heavily soiled items or disinfecting clothing, however, for your average wash, 30 degrees or lower will work just as well. 

Photo by Teona Swift from Pexels

Hand wash

If you only have a couple of items to wash, and they aren’t heavily soiled, then save energy by hand washing them. Fill a basin with lukewarm water, add your detergent, and submerge your items. Use kneading and swishing motions to ensure that the detergent has been adequately worked into your items, before rinsing them off in clean water, and leaving them to dry. Hand washing works just as well as its machine alternative and uses a lot less energy. 

Photo by Teona Swift from Pexels

Wash full loads

It can be tempting to wash your clothes as soon as you notice your laundry piling up, but it’s best to wait until you can fill your washing machine. Doing half loads of washing throughout the week will use more energy, and more time, than doing one or two big loads once a week. If you need an item of clothing washed urgently, hand wash it instead. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Use a high spin speed

Increasing the spin speed of your washing machine will extract more water from your clothing and decrease drying time. Before selecting a higher spin speed, check that it won’t cause any damage to your clothing. High spin speeds should not be used on delicate items, such as silk, but are best for heavier materials, such as denim

Photo by Engin Akyurt from Pexels

Air dry clothes

There are many benefits to air drying your clothes besides saving energy. Drying clothes in their original shape reduces the number of wrinkles on the item, therefore meaning less, or even no, time spent ironing. Avoiding putting your clothes in a dryer can also help with their longevity. Rather than being tumbled in a machine until dry, air drying is much gentler on the fibres of your clothing, causing less risk of rips and tears. Additionally, if you dry your clothes outdoors, you will be left with the smell of fresh air every time you put on a new item. 

Photo by Olga Lioncat from Pexels

Don’t use timed cycles 

Despite the benefits of air drying, there are reasons why you may need to use a tumble dryer. If this is the case, save energy by avoiding timed cycles. Timed cycles work based on a time scale rather than whether your clothes are dry or not. For example, your clothing could be dry in 30 minutes, but if the cycle is running for an hour, the dryer won’t stop until that hour is up. Instead, use an automatic cycle, which uses moisture sensors to determine whether your clothes are dry. If your machine does not have an automatic cycle, keep checking the dryness of your clothes throughout the cycle.

Photo by Max Vakhtbovych from Pexels

Clean your dryer

Tumble dryers only work if they are regularly cleaned. If you do not regularly clean your tumble dryer then air can become trapped and your clothing will not dry as quickly, meaning that you use more energy. Make sure that your dryer has been adequately cleaned before putting clothing in it, and if it hasn’t clean it. Not only will it be more energy-efficient, but it could also prevent a fire. 

Use dryer balls

Dryer balls are small, round, balls of wool, rubber, or plastic that you put in your tumble dryer to reduce drying time by up to 25%. They work in a similar way to dryer sheets, however are much more environmentally conscious as they are reusable. If you don’t want to buy dryer balls you can easily make them. For single-use dryer balls, you can scrunch up tinfoil into a ball shape, or, for multi-use dryer balls use felted wool and follow this method

Turn off your machines

One of the easiest ways to save energy when doing your laundry is to make sure that your machines are turned off. Even if your machines aren’t running a cycle, if there are lights on then they are still using energy. After using your washing machine and tumble dryer, make sure that they are switched off and, for extra precaution, switch them off at the plug. This way, you will know for certain that they are using no energy at all. 

Make sure that your machines are energy efficient

Due to technological advances, most modern washing machines are much more energy efficient than older models. If your washing machine and tumble dryer are slightly older, you may want to invest in newer models. When shopping for a washing machine and tumble dryer, look out for a blue Energy Efficiency Recommended logo. These won’t be the cheapest machines so it will be an investment, but they will run much more efficiently and save you money in the long run. 

At Laundryheap we are constantly improving the way we work to be more efficient and environmentally conscious. To book your Laundryheap order, simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app.


Leave a comment

Copenhagen must-see sights

Image by City Clock Magazine

When you are visiting a country for only a small amount of time, it can be hard to prioritse what you should see and what you can miss. If you are visiting Copenhagen, these are the sites you should not be missing out on. 

  • Tivoli Gardens 
  • Christiansborg Palace
  • Nyhavn Harbour
  • The Round Tower
  • The Little Mermaid
  • Torvehallerne Food Market
  • Frederik’s Church
  • Rosenborg Castle 
  • The Wooden Skyscraper 
  • Bakken 

Tivoli Gardens

The magic of Tivoli Gardens is a Copenhagen site that you would be devastated to miss. Since its opening in 1843, Tivoli Gardens has been delighting visitors of all ages with its beautiful architecture, lush gardens, and, at night, twinkling lights that add to the fairy tale atmosphere. Walt Disney himself even visited Tivoli Gardens and said that it was his inspiration for Disney World. Whether you are a thrill-seeker looking to ride the rollercoasters, or you’re more interested in taking in the beautiful architecture and gardens, there is something to please everyone at Tivoli Gardens. 

Christiansborg Palace

If you want to experience 800 years of history in one day then head to Christiansborg Palace. Although most of the palace is open for visitors to tour, it is still home to the Danish parliament, the Prime Ministers office, and the Supreme Court, and some rooms are still occupied by the Royal Family. With every ticket for the Royal Reception Rooms, you will be given a free guided tour of the palace. Even if you don’t want to explore the inside, the outside of the palace is just as beautiful. 

Image by Jorge Franganillo

Nyhavn Harbour

Nyhavn was once a busy commercial port where ships from across the world would dock. Today, you can find hoards of people relaxing, drinking, and enjoying jazz music in restaurants that line the port. The old houses of Nyhavn, some of which fairy tale writer Hans Christian Anderson occupied, have been renovated and in their place stand brightly coloured homes that paint the perfect picture of happiness. If you’re looking for somewhere to drink, eat good food, and enjoy a relaxing day, then look no further than Nyhavn Harbour.

Image by E_Scott from Pixabay

The Round Tower

Built in 1642, The Round Tower is a 36-meter-high building that offers incredible views of the Old Town of Copenhagen. The tower was built by Christian IV in a time when Denmark was renowned for its astronomical achievements, thanks to Tycho Brahe. When Brahe died, Christian IV built The Round Tower to encourage astronomers to carry on Brahe’s work. Today, it is still used by amateur astronomers, but is used more to get panoramic views of the Old Town. Be warned, to get to the viewing platform you must walk up a spiral staircase, but, if the staircases hasn’t already, the view at the top will take your breath away. 

Image by Maria Eklind

The Little Mermaid

The Little Mermaid has become an iconic landmark in Copenhagen. Based off of the Hans Christian Anderson tale of the same name, the statue sits by the waterside at the Langelinie promenade, and depicts a human turning into a mermaid. It was commissioned in 1909 by Carl Jacobsen, who had become fascinated by a ballet based on the tale. Edvard Eriksen sculpted the piece, and the grand unveiling took place in August 1913. It has since become a symbol for Copenhagen in the same way at the Statue of Liberty has for New York, and tourists flock to the statute to take pictures. You may be waiting a while to see the mermaid, but you wouldn’t want to miss it. 

Photo by C1superstar from Pexels

Torvehallerne Food Market

Conveniently situated close to Nørreport Station, Torvehallerne Food Market is one of Copenhagen’s most popular markets. With more than 80 shops to browse, you can find everything from traditional Danish food to local vegetables and fresh fish. It’s the perfect place to stroll around at your leisure, try some samples, and enjoy what produce Copenhagen has to offer. 

Image by Heather Cowper

Frederik’s Church

Nicknamed The Marble Church, Frederik’s Church is one of the most impressive buildings in Copenhagen. Located in Frederiksstaden, the foundation stone of the church was laid in 1749, but the project was not completed until 1894. The building itself is incredibly striking, with a copper green dome that juxtaposes the delicate white marble beautifully. Inside the church is equally as delightful, so it is no surprise that couples are desperate to get married here. The church room is open to the public, as is the dome which offers draw-dropping views of Copenhagen. 

Image by Tony Webster

Rosenborg Castle 

Built as a country summer house by Christian IV 400 years ago, Rosenborg Castle offers visitors the chance to travel back in time and explore the grandeur of Christian IV life. After exploring the pomp and pageantry of the castle, visitors can roam the Kongens Have (the Kings Garden), the oldest royal garden in Denmark. Estimated to attract 2.5 million visitors every year, these gardens are a popular retreat for tourists and locals alike. Sit on the lush green grass, wander the paths, and feel like a true royal for the day.

Image by Steve Barker from Pixabay

The Wooden Skyscraper 

An hour south of Copenhagen, standing in the Gisselfeld Klosters Forest, you will find Denmark’s Wooden Skyscraper. What appears to be a structure right out of a Hans Christian Anderson fairy tale, is a 45 meter tall observation tower, completed with a spiralling walkway for easy access. Made from weathered steel and local oak, the structure blends seamlessly into the surrounding forest environment. Once you reach the top, you will be treated to views of rolling hills, lakes, and, on a clear day, Copenhagen. Although you have to travel an hour outside of the city to reach the structure, the spectacular view, both on the way up and from the top, is worth it.

Image by Stig Nygaard

Bakken 

Located in the woods of Dyrehaven you will find Bakken, the oldest amusement park in the world. Founded in 1853, Bakken has been delighting visitors of all ages for centuries. Whether you are a thrill seeker looking to ride rollercoasters, or you want to stroll around the independent stalls, there is something for everyone. Whilst visiting, look out for Pjerrot, the white-faced clown who has been delighting visitors since the parks opening. 

Image by J M Rice

With so many amazing sights in Copenhagen, the last sight you want to see is your laundry pile. Luckily, we can take care of that for you. Simply head to the Laundryheap website, or download the free Laundryheap app, to make your booking today. 


Leave a comment

Living in London made easier

Living in London can be hard. It’s expensive, people can be rude, and the tube system is a labyrinth that not even the most seasoned Londoner can understand. But, it is also a multicultural metropolis, overflowing with amazing things to see and adventures to have. There are an abundance of ways that can make living in London less stressful, less costly, and, overall, easier. 

  • Oyster cards
  • Railcard
  • Maps
  • Savings websites
  • Banking
  • Weather 
  • Theatre 
  • Food
  • The Residence
  • Laundryheap 

Oyster cards

Whether you prefer taking the bus, tube, or train, there is no escaping public transport in London. You can pay for public transport via contactless or card payment, however, the best way is via an Oyster card. An Oyster card is a reusable card that can be used on all forms of public transport across London. You can top up your card at most London tube stations or online whenever you are running low on funds, and use it the very same day. What is more, Oyster cards have a cap on how much you can spend in one day, meaning that you will never be charged more than £13.50.

Image by Rachel Lovinger

Railcard 

A Railcard is incredibly handy to have for travelling both within and outside of London. There are several different types of Railcard that you can purchase, however they are all priced between £20 and £30. With a Railcard, you can get one third off of your train fares and, if you link it to your Oyster card, one third off of off-peak rail fares, including the tube and DLR. 

Photo by Paul IJsendoorn from Pexels

Maps

London is a big city. So big, in fact, that it would be preposterous to even imagine navigating it without using a map. Luckily, there are several useful apps that can help you to not only navigate the city, but also plan public transport journeys. These apps mean that you will never get lost in London again, and that you will always be able to find public transport to aid you on your journey. 

Photo by Ingo Joseph from Pexels

Savings websites

Living in London can be incredibly expensive. Bills, food shopping, transport, the cost of living, it all adds up. Luckily, there are several savings websites that offer discounts on all manner of items, including everyday essentials and nights out. Simply head to these discount websites and search for items you are looking for discounts on. If you find a website in particular that offers good deals, subscribing to their newsletter will often give you a first-look at what discounts are available and/or coming up. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Banking 

With so much to do, see, and experience in London, it can be very easy to let your money get away from you. The majority of banks now have apps that can help you access your bank account faster. They will often send notifications directly to your phone when money is coming out of your account or when you are running out of funds. If you are looking for an alternative way to manage your money, Monzo is an online bank whose app helps to break down exactly where your money is being spent. This helps to identify what areas you are spending the most money on, and perhaps where you could save. 

Photo by Anete Lusina from Pexels

Weather

UK weather is unpredictable. The sun could be shining brightly in the morning but by the evening you could be stuck in torrential rain. Most phones now come with a weather app pre-downloaded, however, if you don’t have one, it’s best to download one ASAP. It will help you to plan your day around changes in the weather, meaning you will never be caught in the rain without an umbrella again. 

Photo by S Migaj from Pexels

Theatre 

One of the many joys of living in London is the glorious West End, where there is no end to the wonderful musicals and plays that are performed every day. If you enjoy a trip to the theatre, then you will want to download Stagedoor. It can be hard to narrow down what to see on the West End, but Stagedoor can make your choice easier with reviews from both theatre critics and previous audience members. On the app you can also book tickets and access offers for discounted meals and even discounted tickets. The wonders of the West End awaits. 

Photo by Monica Silvestre from Pexels

Food

London is a multicultural hub and, as such, there are an abundance of restaurants to try. Eating at different restaurants guarantees that you will always be treated to amazing food, however can be incredibly expensive. Luckily, apps, such as OpenTable, offer huge discounts on some of the top restaurants in London. Simply see what reservations they have open, and book as soon as possible. Be quick though, because there will be other eagle eyed people waiting for a top reservation at a low price, so you have to act fast. 

Photo by Sebastian Coman Photography from Pexels

The Residence 

One of the most difficult parts of living in London is finding the perfect home. You want to find somewhere that is within your budget, with good transport links, and plenty of local amenities- which is easier said than done. Luckily, The Residence offers the perfect solution. Whilst you find your dream home, you can stay in one of The Residence luxury apartments, located specifically for ease of commute, accessibility of services, and transport links. The contemporary design of each apartment offers a relaxing oasis from the hustle and bustle of city living, whilst also creating the perfect environment for finding your dream home. What is more, all guests of The Residence can enjoy 20% off of their first Laundryheap order using the code RD20. 

Image courtesy of The Residence website

Laundryheap 

We all detest doing laundry, and when you live in the city it seems like there are never enough hours in the day to get it done. Luckily, Laundryheap is here to help. We pick up your dirty laundry, wash it, and re-deliver it to you, all in as little as 24 hours. All you have to do is head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to make your booking today. At least that’s one thing ticked off of your to-do list.


Leave a comment

Rotterdam fun facts

Rotterdam is the second largest city in the Netherlands, made famous for its modern architecture. Quirky architecture is not the only interesting thing about Rotterdam though. 

  • The flag of Rotterdam
  • Rotterdam’s motto
  • An old city
  • Netherlands skyline
  • Spy centre
  • Europort
  • Eco station
  • Dr
  • Expats
  • The Witte Huis 

The flag of Rotterdam 

The colours of Rotterdam have been green and white since the Middle Ages, but the number of lines on the flag have changed. The current flag, which has been official since 1949, is a green horizontal stripe followed by a white stripe, and a final green stripe. The green represents the Court of Wena, a castle that stood on the former Hofplein Station, and the white symbolises the Rotte river. 

Image by Jeroen Kransen

Rotterdam’s motto  

Rotterdam’s motto is ‘sterker door strijd’, which translates to ‘stronger through battle’. It was adopted after the second world war by Queen Wilhelmina as a testament to the courage and bravery of Rotterdammers during the second world war. You can see the motto underneath the coat of arms of Rotterdam. 

Image by Le contributeur wikicommons Arch.

An old city 

Looking around Rotterdam, admiring it’s modern architecture, you would believe that it was a fairly new city. In fact, Rotterdam gained its city rights in 1340. Unfortunately, the city was heavily bombed during the second world war, and so most of it had to be rebuilt, forming the city we know today. 

Image by Clemens Lettinck from Pixabay

Netherlands skyline  

Rotterdam is the only city in the Netherlands with a skyline. Made from 352 high-rise buildings, the Rotterdam skyline is often referred to as ‘the Manhattan on the Maas’ because most of the buildings are situated on the river Maas and new high rises are constantly being built. The tallest building in Rotterdam, and the Netherlands, is the Maastoren, which is 165 meters tall. 

Spy centre  

During the first world war, Rotterdam became the biggest spy centre in the world for both Germany and Britain. This was because the Netherlands, and therefore Rotterdam, was a neutral country and was also placed perfectly in between Germany and Britain. Rotterdam was particularly popular because it had excellent ferry and railway connections with Britain, Germany, and Belgium.

Europort 

Rotterdam’s harbour, Europort, is the biggest port in Europe, 10th biggest port in the world, and the 11th biggest container port in the world. It is considered one of the busiest ports in the world and a major entry point into Europe

Eco station

Rotterdam Central Station is the main station in Rotterdam. It’s roof is formed from 28,000 square meters of glass plates and 10,000 square meters of stainless steel. 10,000 meters of the glass contain 136,000 solar cells, which supplies 8% of the daily electricity the train station uses. 

Image by Rudy and Peter Skitterians from Pixabay

Dr

In the Scheepsvaart area of Rotterdam is a secret club called Dr. Known as one of the best cocktail bars in Rotterdam, you can only enter the bar if you have a patient number that you are given when you pre-book. As the name suggests, the bar is doctor themed, but once inside you are not allowed to take photos, use your phone, or talk about the bar. The air of mystery is what has helped maintain the hype and mystery of the cocktail bar since its opening in 2012. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Expats

Only, roughly, 50% of the people living in Rotterdam are Dutch. The city attracts a large number of expats, mostly due to its renowned universities, and, as such, is hugely multicultural. It now has its own Chinatown, an abundance of restaurants catering to world cuisines, and festivals to celebrate its ever growing multiculturalism. 

The Witte Huis 

The Witte Huis, or the White House, was the first skyscraper in Rotterdam. Built between 1897 and 1898 by architect Willem Molenbroek, the building is 11 stories high. There were many people who were sceptical as to whether the building would be supported by the soil. It was one of the only buildings in Rotterdam city centre that survived the big bombardment in 1940. 

Image by MatteoNL97

Reading fun facts about Rotterdam is great, but experiencing them first hand is even better. Whilst you explore Rotterdam, let us sort out your laundry. Book your Laundryheap order by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app.


Leave a comment

How to care for your kitchen textiles

Photo by Charlotte May from Pexels

Surrounded by food and drink, it’s no surprise that our kitchen textiles can become filthy fast. Which is why we need to make sure that we are taking the proper care to both clean and disinfect them. 

  • Tea towels
  • Aprons
  • Oven gloves
  • Tablecloth
  • Napkin 

Tea towels 

Tea towels can always be relied upon to mop up spills and wet areas. They come into constant contact with a number of different bacteria throughout the day, which is why they should be washed at the end of every day. 

Tea towels are often made from linen, which is a very durable material. As such, you can wash them in your washing machine on a regular setting, at a temperature anywhere between 30 and 50 degrees Celsius. It is best to use a biological detergent to wash your tea towels as they contain enzymes that will help break down proteins, fats, and starches. After washing your tea towels, dry them completely, either by tumble drying them or leaving them to air dry, before reusing them. 

Photo by Alex Green from Pexels

Aprons 

Similarly to tea towels, aprons are prone to having food and drinks splashed onto them. If you wear your apron every day, you should wash it every other day, unless something spills on it that could stain in which case wash it immediately. 

Before washing your apron, first pre-treat any stains that you may have. Food stains, for example, can be incredibly stubborn and therefore hard to remove, so it’s best to pre-treat those before putting your apron straight in the washing machine. After pre-treating your stains, tie your apron strings together and place it in a mesh laundry bag. This will help prevent your apron strings from becoming tangled in your other washing. If your apron is white, you may want to use liquid chlorine bleach to maintain the crisp whiteness of your apron. If not, or if your apron is any other colour, then use an oxygenated detergent on a cold wash setting. Completely dry your apron before re-wearing. 

Photo by Klaus Nielsen from Pexels

Oven gloves

Oven gloves protect our hands when handling hot trays. In order to do this, they are made from an array of heat proof materials which need to be cared for when washing. To maintain the cleanliness of your oven gloves wash them every month, or when they become heavily stained. It’s important to always check your oven glove care label before washing.

To lift dried food stains from your oven gloves, begin by adding half a cup of mild laundry detergent to a gallon of warm water. Soak a dish cloth in the detergent, and then wring it out so it is damp. Gently dab your oven glove with the dish cloth, focusing on any particularly dirty spots. Continue dabbing until you are satisfied that all the dried food stains have been lifted, and then leave your oven glove to dry for 30 minutes.  

After 30 minutes, wash your oven glove in the washing machine per the care label instructions. If your oven gloves are particularly greasy, you may want to add baking soda to your washing machine. 

Tablecloth

Tablecloths are often used to decorate and protect a table from food and drink stains. As such, they should be cleaned every month to avoid them becoming dusty, or when they become heavily stained

If your tablecloth requires pre-treatment, e.g. if it has food stains on it, use your fingers or a soft bristled brush to rub heavy duty laundry detergent into the stains. Leave your detergent to sit for 15 minutes before putting your tablecloth in the washing machine. 

To machine wash your tablecloth, set your washing machine to a cool cycle and, if your machine has one, use a permanent press cycle. This will help reduce wrinkles on your tablecloth. Using a heavy duty laundry detergent will help to lift any stains on your table cloth, and fabric softener will provide a protective coating to your tablecloths fibres which will prevent food and drink stains from penetrating the fabric as quickly. 

To dry your tablecloth either tumble or air dry, however, if you are using a tumble dryer use a low heat setting. Make sure that your tablecloth is completely dry before putting it back on your table. 

Photo by Eli Verenich from Pexels

Napkins

Linen napkins are much more pleasing to the eye than the paper alternatives. They will often become heavily stained with food and drink, so it’s always best to hand wash them after every use to ensure that all stains are fully removed. 

To hand wash your napkins begin by filling a sink with warm water and adding a gentle laundry detergent. If your napkins are white, you may also want to add a small amount of bleach, or natural alternative, to maintain their crisp whiteness. Add your napkins to the water, and gently swish them in the water with your hands, rubbing and squeezing them to ensure that the detergent is being fully absorbed. You may want to use a soft bristled brush to scrub any particularly tough stains. Continue this until you are satisfied that your napkins have been cleaned and all stains have been removed. Remove your napkins from the detergent water and rinse them with clean lukewarm water. Continue rinsing until there is no detergent left. 

To dry your napkins, use a low heat setting on your tumble dryer or lay them on a flat surface to air dry. Make sure that all of your napkins are completely dry before reusing them. 

Photo by mali maeder from Pexels

If you are having difficulty cleaning your kitchen linens, let us do it for you. Laundryheap does not only wash and dry clean clothing, we also care for bed and kitchen linens. Book your Laundryheap order by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. 


Leave a comment

Stockholm must-see sights

Photo by Jan Židlický from Pexels

Stockholm is a beautiful city, filled with so many amazing sights it can be overwhelming to narrow down the ones to see first. Hopefully, our Stockholm must-see sights list can help shed some light on the sights you simply can not miss. 

  • The Abba museum 
  • Skansen 
  • The Royal Palace
  • Skyview
  • Royal National City Park
  • Gamla Stan
  • Paradiset Nature Reserve
  • Birka 
  • The Nobel museum 

The Abba museum 

When you think of Sweden it’s almost impossible to not think of Abba. The band’s career defined a decade and their influence can still be heard in today’s music industry. You can take a deep dive into the legendary back catalogue of Abba at the Abba museum. Unlike any other museum, this is an interactive experience which encourages visitors to dance, play, and, most importantly, have fun. You can try on Abba’s infamous costumes, mix their original music, and even perform with them live on stage. You may walk into the museum, but you will certainly be dancing on your way out. 

Image by Mike Licht

Skansen

If you want to learn about the history of Sweden, visit Skansen. It is the world’s oldest open air museum, where the past meets the present in perfect harmony. Opened in 1891, more than 150 buildings from across Sweden were collected and reassembled to create a traditional Swedish town. Once you have wandered around the manor houses, bakeries, and churches of times past, you can visit the Skansen aquarium and zoo. Home to more than 200 species from around the world, you can marvel at bears, wolves, and seals, before aweing at the marine life on show. Skansen is the perfect day out for all ages. 

Image by Holger.Ellgaard

The Royal Palace

The Royal Palace is the official residence of His Majesty the King and one of Europe’s largest and most dynamic palaces. Built in a baroque style, the palace has more than 600 rooms, divided over 11 floors, including 3 museums. Guided tours are offered around the palace and it’s grounds, however, even if you don’t take a guided tour, the palace is a striking building to admire and a definite must-see sight. 

Image by Mariano Mantel

SkyView

The best way to view Stockholm is by taking the SkyView. Travelling up Stockholm’s Avicii Arena, the world’s largest spherical building, in a clear glass pod, you will be treated to 360 degree, panoramic, views of Stockholm. Each trip takes roughly 30 minutes, so you will have plenty of time to take in the sights before heading to one of the Avicii Arena’s legendary shows. 

Image by kallerna

Royal National City Park

The Royal National City Park was the first urban park in the world. Stretching 6 miles long, the park joins the city of Stockholm with the neighbouring forests, meaning an array of wildlife can be spotted roaming the fields. You could spend days getting lost in the confines of the park, exploring the lakes and rocky hilltops. Nestled within the park are an abundance of attractions, including museums, an amusement park, and sports facilities.

Image by Mariano Mantel

Gamla Stan

Gamla Stan is where Stockholm was founded in 1252. It is one of the largest and well preserved city centres in Europe, and acts as a fully functional museum. As you journey through winding cobbled streets you can admire cellar vaults from the Middle Ages, alongside restaurants, cafes, and bars. Within Gamla Stan you will find some of Stockholm’s most iconic buildings, including Sweden’s national cathedral and the Royal Palace. Gamla Stan has historical significance hidden behind every corner, so make sure that you take a full day to fully explore its alleys. 

Photo by Katie Evensen from Pexels

Paradiset Nature Reserve

The Swedish interpretation of paradise can be found at Paradiset Nature Reserve. A popular spot for hikers, the reserve is formed from untouched forests, lakes and cliffs. Nestled within the depths of the reserve are small cabins that are free to stay in overnight. They operate on a first come first serve basis so it’s best to snap one up ASAP. Paradiset Nature Reserve is the perfect place to get away from the city and escape into nature. 

Image by Holger.Ellgaard

Birka 

Founded in the 8th Century, Birka is Sweden’s oldest town. What was once a flourishing Viking trading town is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site that can easily be visited by boat. Whilst visiting Birka you can experience what life would have been like for a viking. You can stroll through an exact replica of a Viking village, meet the Elk Man from the 8th Century, and discover objects found from archaeological excavations. It’s a true deep-dive into the history of Sweden. 

Image by chas B

The Nobel Museum 

Opened in the Spring of 2001 to celebrate The Nobel Prize’s 100th anniversary, The Nobel Museum provides information about the Nobel Prize and past Nobel Prize winners. Through a combination of films, theatre plays, and debates, the work of Nobel Prize winners is immortalised within the walls of the Nobel Museum. You can even take a piece of The Nobel Prize away with you when you visit the gift shop.

Image by Tuomas Vitikainen

Whilst you are out exploring Stockholm, we can explore your laundry basket. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your order. 


Leave a comment

Staying cool whilst working from home

Photo by Elle Hughes from Pexels

Working from home is challenging at the best of times, but it’s made even harder during the summer months. Studies have shown that hot days can decrease productivity by 24%. That being said, these tips will hopefully make working from home in the summer a little more bearable. 

  • (Under)dress for the job
  • Freeze your feet
  • Let in air 
  • Avoid fans
  • Cool your pulse point 
  • Stay hydrated 
  • Eat smart
  • Go outside
  • Sit at a desk/table 
  • Try to alter your working hours

(Under)dress for the job

One of the joys of working from home is that, unless on a video call, nobody can see you. That means that you can dress, or underdress, in whatever way makes you feel comfortable. If that means wearing shorts and a vest to help cool yourself down, that’s up to you to decide. You make your own dress code when working from your own home. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Freeze your feet

Have you ever been so hot that you wish that you could stick your feet in the freezer until autumn comes? Well, that’s because your feet and ankles have many pulse points and are sensitive to heat. If you put something cold on them then your whole body will cool down. Try and freeze a hot water bottle, or a similar object, and rest your feet against it whilst you work. You will notice your body instantly cooling.  

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Let in air

This may seem obvious, but a good way to help cool yourself down is to let in the fresh air. What may not be as obvious is to open your windows but shut your curtains. Blocking the sun with your curtains will prevent your home from becoming a sticky greenhouse, whilst keeping your windows open will allow any breeze to drift through and cool your abode. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Avoid fans

Although fans are a popular way to stay cool during the summer they are not the best way to beat the heat. Fans circulate the hot air in a room rather than cool it, which means that once the fan is turned off you are still left with a stiflingly hot room. If you are going to use a fan, place a 2-liter bottle of frozen water in front of it. This will help to cool the air slightly rather than just circulating it. 

Photo by Enrique Zafra from Pexels

Cool your pulse point 

Pulse points are the areas of the body where blood vessels are close to the surface of the skin, which is why we can feel our pulses. Because the blood vessels are so close to the surface of the skin, they are also a great way to quickly cool down our blood and, subsequently, body temperature. Take regular breaks throughout the day to apply ice packs to your wrists, neck, chest, and temples. It may also be a good idea to apply a damp cloth to the back of your neck whilst you’re working to maintain a cool temperature throughout the day. 

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Stay hydrated

Staying hydrated keeps our body temperature regulated, prevents infection, and provides nutrients for our body’s cells. We should be drinking 6-8 glasses of water every day, however, when it is particularly warm we should be drinking water more regularly. Make sure that you keep track of how much water you drink throughout the day and moderate it depending on whether you are drinking enough. 

Photo by Daria Shevtsova from Pexels

Eat smart 

In addition to drinking plenty of water, another way to stay hydrated is to eat smart. Fresh foods, such as lettuce, cucumber, and celery, have a high water content which helps us to hydrate when we eat them. When it’s particularly warm try to eat more fresh fruit and vegetables and avoid eating meat. When our bodies break down meat we use extra energy, which causes us to sweat, otherwise known as the ‘meat sweats’.

Photo by Elle Hughes from Pexels

Go outside

If there is a gentle summer breeze, then make sure to take regular breaks and go outside. Take a walk around a park, your neighbourhood, or even your own garden, but make sure that you make the most of the nice weather and breathe in some fresh air. Not only will the breeze help to cool you down, but regularly breathing fresh air increases productivity as it de-stresses the body and clears the mind. Of course, if it is a particularly humid day going outside may cause your temperature to increase rather than cool you down, so try and avoid heading outside in such conditions. 

Photo by Samson Katt from Pexels

Sit at a desk/table

When working from home, it can sometimes be luxurious to work from the comfort of the couch or even a bed. That being said, when it is warm the last thing you want is a hot laptop sitting on your legs. Avoid this unnecessary heat by working from a desk, table, or any surface where you can place your laptop and sit comfortably. 

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Try to alter your working hours

As the sun sets the temperature drops, making for much more comfortable working conditions. If you are in a job that allows you to do so, have a conversation with your manager/HR department about altering your working hours. Pitch starting later in the day and working until later in the night so that you can avoid the hottest hours of the day. This could help increase your productivity and prevent you from suffering through working in the heat.

Photo by Vlada Karpovich from Pexels

Working from home is difficult regardless of the weather. Let us take one thing off of your mind by taking care of your laundry. Simply head to the Laundryheap website or download the free Laundryheap app to book your order now.


Leave a comment

Why do we need clean beaches?

Photo by Adrianna Calvo from Pexels

Every day 8 million pieces of litter enter the sea. This includes plastic bags, metal cans, fishing nets, and cigarettes. Beach clean-ups are essential in preventing human waste from reaching the ocean and causing more damage to our environment. These are just 5 of the reasons they are so important. 

  • Beaches in the ecosystem
  • Saving marine animals
  • A thriving economy 
  • Limit illness 
  • A safer environment 

Beaches in the ecosystem 

Beaches are an integral part of our ecosystem. They provide a home for thousands of marine species, some of which can’t be seen by the naked eye. These tiny organisms are essential in the process of seawater filtration and nutrient recycling, which gives us fresh water to drink. In addition to this, many marine creatures, such as sea turtles, use beaches to nest and lay eggs. If beaches continue to be polluted, these species will have no space to nest, leading to their extinction, and a drastic shift in the food chain. 

Photo by Jolo Diaz from Pexels

Saving marine animals 

8.3 million tonnes of plastic is discarded in the ocean every year, killing 1 million marine animals. Beach clean-ups lower the chances of species coming into contact with and being harmed by waste left on the beach. What may seem like only a plastic bottle, could cause serious harm to marine life, so it’s best to pick it up and eliminate the risk. 

Photo by Lucien Wanda from Pexels

A thriving economy 

Beaches attract millions of tourists to coastal locations, encouraging them to explore not only the beach but the local attractions. Globally, tourism makes up for 1 in 4 jobs, making it a financially viable industry we must continue growing. If our beaches are overly polluted, tourists won’t be interested in visiting coastal areas and spending money on local businesses, resulting in global job losses.

Limit illness

The pollution we put into the ocean can end up making us sick. The average seafood eater will consume 11,000 fragments of plastic every year, the chemicals of which can make you incredibly ill. Picking up as much plastic as possible from our beaches will prevent it from polluting the waters and the marine life we may end up eating, lessening our chances of becoming ill. 

Photo by Harrison Haines from Pexels

A safer environment 

Polluted beaches filled with discarded litter are not only damaging to the ecosystem but are also incredibly dangerous for visitors. Broken glass, plastic bags, and cigarette butts can cause serious harm to anyone strolling down the beach who may happen to accidentally step on them. The risk of damage increases for children who are more likely to pick up pieces of rubbish and mistake them for toys or ingestible items. It’s simply safer in all manners to pick up litter as soon as you see it. 

Photo by Ben Mack from Pexels

Whilst you help clean up your local beach, we will help clean up your laundry pile. Book your Laundryheap order now by heading to the Laundryheap website or downloading the free Laundryheap app. If you are residing in Dallas, use the code TRY25US to get 25% off of your first Laundryheap order.